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Hyaluronic acid, an important factor in the wound healing properties of amniotic fluid: In vitro studies of re-epithelialisation in human skin wounds
Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Hand- och plastikkirurgiska kliniken US. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Brännskadevård.
Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Brännskadevård. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Hand- och plastikkirurgiska kliniken US.
Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Anestesi- och intensivvårdskliniken VIN.
Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
Vise andre og tillknytning
2013 (engelsk)Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 47, nr 2, s. 89-92Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Foetal wounds are unique in their ability to heal rapidly without forming scars. The amniotic fluid, rich in nutrients, growth factors, and hyaluronic acid, surrounds the foetus and is essential to foetal wound healing. The wound healing properties of foetal wounds may be the result of high concentrations of hyaluronic acid. This study aimed to verify that amniotic fluid induces re-epithelialisation in human skin wounds in vitro and to study whether this ability is dependent on hyaluronic acid. Standard deep dermal wounds were produced in vitro in human skin. The skin samples, with a central wound, were incubated in different culture media. Varying concentrations of amniotic fluid and amniotic fluid with added hyaluronidase were tested, and re-epithelialisation was assessed at 3, 7, and 12 days using light microscopy, after staining with haematoxylin and eosin. Amniotic fluid 50% resulted in a significantly higher (p andlt; 0.05) grade of re-epithelialisation than Dulbeccos modified Eagles medium and 10% amniotic fluid at all time points. When 50% amniotic fluid was compared with 10% foetal calf serum, no significant difference was found in grades of re-epithelialisation on days 3 and 12 and significantly higher grades of re-epithelialisation on day 7 (p andlt; 0.05). Degradation of hyaluronic acid in the medium that contained 50% amniotic fluid gave significantly impaired re-epithelialisation (p andlt; 0.05) on culture days 3 and 7. In conclusion, amniotic fluid promotes accelerated re-epithelialisation and hyaluronic acid is an important ingredient.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Informa Healthcare , 2013. Vol. 47, nr 2, s. 89-92
Emneord [en]
Amniotic fluid, fibroblasts, human, hyaluronic acid, hyaluronidase, in vitro, keratinocytes, wound healing
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91006DOI: 10.3109/2000656X.2012.733169ISI: 000316362300002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-91006DiVA, id: diva2:615672
Merknad

Funding Agencies|Swedish Fund for Research without Animal Experiments||

Tilgjengelig fra: 2013-04-11 Laget: 2013-04-11 Sist oppdatert: 2019-01-07bibliografisk kontrollert
Inngår i avhandling
1. Guided Regeneration of the Human Skin: in vitro and in vivo studies
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Guided Regeneration of the Human Skin: in vitro and in vivo studies
2015 (engelsk)Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

Every day and in all parts of the world, humans experience different grades of wounding and tissue loss of the skin, thus initiating one of the most complex biological processes. Acute and chronic wounds, as well as the additional problem of skin scarring, involve not only great suffering for the patient but also extensive health care costs for the society. Although the wound-healing process is a wellstudied field much knowledge must be gained to unlock the door to regenerative pathways in humans.

Epidermis heals by complete regeneration, but dermal and full thickness injuries heal with fibrosis and scar formation. In Papers I and II, we studied whether dermal scarring could be turned into regeneration by using two different types of threedimensional dermal scaffolds. In Paper I, we studied a solid scaffold made of poly(urethane urea), initially in vitro then followed by in vivo studies. In Paper II, we intradermally injected a liquid three-dimensional scaffold consisting of porous gelatin spheres in human healthy volunteers. Both materials showed ingrowth of functional fibroblasts and blood vessels and appeared to stimulate regeneration while slowly degrading. This finding could be of significant clinical importance, for example in burn wound care or after cancer surgery.

In Papers III and IV, we wanted to study the effects of amniotic fluid and hyaluronic acid on adult wound healing, because early fetal wounds re-epithelialize rapidly and naturally heal dermis by regeneration without the need of a dermal scaffold. Amniotic fluid, naturally rich in hyaluronic acid, induced an accelerated reepithelialization of adult human wounds in vitro, and hyaluronic acid seemed to be important for this effect. Stimulation with exogenous hyaluronic acid in vivo induced accelerated re-epithelialization and an altered protein expression in healthy human volunteers. The inflammatory phase of wound healing, as measured by tissue viability imaging, was not affected by hyaluronic acid. Elucidating the effects of amniotic fluid and hyaluronic acid on the wound-healing process may allow improved treatment of wounds with impaired healing.

Studies on finding new dermal scaffolds and studies on the positive effect of amniotic fluid or hyaluronic acid on the wound-healing process are two different ways of gaining insight that may lead to regeneration and improved wound healing for the patient.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015. s. 95
Serie
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1450
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115598 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-115598 (DOI)978-91-7519-114-0 (ISBN)
Disputas
2015-04-20, Berzeliussalen, Campus US, Linköping, 09:00 (svensk)
Opponent
Veileder
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-03-17 Laget: 2015-03-17 Sist oppdatert: 2019-11-15bibliografisk kontrollert

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