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Bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw in a rat model arises first after the bone has become exposed. No primary necrosis in unexposed bone
Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Ortopedi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Käkkliniken US.
Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Ortopedi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centrum för kirurgi, ortopedi och cancervård, Ortopedkliniken i Linköping. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Ortopedi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
2012 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 41, nr 6, s. 494-499Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

J Oral Pathol Med (2012) 41: 494499 Background: Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw was first described to start with sterile osteocyte death, similar to osteonecrosis in other parts of the skeleton. The typical chronic osteomyelitis was thought to develop when the dead bone was exposed to the oral cavity. An alternative explanation would be that the chronic osteomyelitis is a result of a bisphosphonate-related inability of infected bony lesions to heal. We tested the hypothesis that primary osteocyte death is not necessary for the development of jaw osteonecrosis. Material and methods: Forty rats were randomly allocated to four groups of 10. All animals underwent unilateral molar extraction and received the following drug treatments: Group I, controls with no drug treatment; Group II, 200 mu g/kg per day alendronate; Groups III and IV, 200 mu g/kg per day alendronate and 1 mg/kg of dexamethasone. All rats were euthanized after 14 days. Presence of osteonecrosis was determined by clinical and histological observations for groups IIII. For group IV, osteocyte viability at the contralateral uninjured site was examined using lactate dehydrogenase histochemistry (LDH). Results: All animals in the alendronate plus dexamethasone groups developed large ONJ-like lesions. Lactate dehydrogenase staining showed viable osteocytes in the contralateral jaw with no tooth extraction. No signs of osteonecosis were seen in the other groups. Conclusion: Bisphosphonates and dexamethasone caused no osteocyte death in uninjured bone, but large ONJ-like lesions after tooth extraction. Osteonecrosis of the jaw appears to arise first after the bone has been exposed. Possibly, bisphosphonates hamper the necessary resorption of bone that has become altered because of infection.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
John Wiley and Sons , 2012. Vol. 41, nr 6, s. 494-499
Nyckelord [en]
bisphosphonates; bisphosphonate associated osteonecrosis of the jaw; osteonecrosis; rat
Nationell ämneskategori
Medicin och hälsovetenskap
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-79679DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0714.2011.01125.xISI: 000305961100010OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-79679DiVA, id: diva2:544280
Tillgänglig från: 2012-08-14 Skapad: 2012-08-13 Senast uppdaterad: 2017-12-07
Ingår i avhandling
1. Bisphosphonates and implants in the jaw bone
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Bisphosphonates and implants in the jaw bone
2013 (Engelska)Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
Abstract [en]

Insertion of metal implants in bone is one of the commonest of all surgical procedures. The success of these operations is dependent on the fixation of the implants, which, in turn, depends on the strength of the bone that holds them. If the quality of the bone holding the implant could be improved locally, surgical procedures would become simpler and rehabilitation would become faster. Bisphosphonates are anti-resorptive drugs that act specifically on osteoclasts, thereby maintaining bone density and strength. Once released from the surface of a coated implant, bisphosphonates reduce osteoclast activity, thereby changing the balance of bone turnover in favor of bone formation, leading to a net gain in local bone density. During the last decades, the effects of bisphosphonate treatment on the stability of implants have been tested in several clinical and animal studies, but not in human jaws. This may be because it has been suggested that there is a link between the use of bisphosphonates (especially those given intravenously) and a condition called osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). The pathophysiology and treatment of ONJ is controversial. The difficulty in treating ONJ has highlighted the importance of prevention.

The overall aim of the present thesis was to evaluate the effect of local and systemic use of bisphosphonates on bone tissue. Could a thin, bisphosphonate-eluting fibrinogen coating improve the fixation of metal implants in the human jaw? Would it be possible to reproduce ONJ and prevent the development of this condition in an animal model?

In two clinical studies, a total number of 96 implants were inserted in 21 patients. In a randomized trial with a paired design, one implant in each pair was coated with a thin fibrinogen layer containing two bisphosphonates (pamidronate and ibandronate). The bisphosphonate-coated implants showed better stability as measured by resonancefrequency analysis. Radiographic intraoral films also showed less bone loss. Three animal models were developed. In a study comparing local and systemic effects of bisphosphonates, zoledronate-coated screws inserted in rats showed better fixation in spite of a drug treatment that is known to induce ONJ-like lesions when given systemically. In another rat model, ONJ-like lesions were reproducibly induced at sites of tooth extraction whereas there were no signs of bone cell death in uninjured sites. Finally, rat experiments showed that the development of ONJ-like lesions after tooth extraction could be prevented by early mucoperiosteal coverage.

In conclusion, a thin, bisphosphonate-eluting fibrinogen coating can improve the fixation of dental implants in human bone. This may lead to new possibilities in orthopaedic surgery and dentistry. The pathophysiology of ONJ is strongly linked to bone exposure in combination with drugs that reduce resorption.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2013. s. 144
Serie
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1348
Nationell ämneskategori
Medicin och hälsovetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89669 (URN)978-91-7519-724-1 (ISBN)
Disputation
2013-03-22, Berzeliussalen, hälsouniversitetet, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 09:00 (Svenska)
Opponent
Handledare
Tillgänglig från: 2013-03-01 Skapad: 2013-03-01 Senast uppdaterad: 2016-09-07Bibliografiskt granskad

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Abtahi, JahanAgholme, FredrikSandberg, OlofAspenberg, Per
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OrtopediHälsouniversitetetKäkkliniken USInstitutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicinOrtopedkliniken i Linköping
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