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Improved helmet design and test methods to reduce rotational induced brain injuries
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0125-0784
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering (Closed 20130701).
2003 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Accidental impacts to the human head are often a combination of translational and rotational accelerations. The most frequent severe brain injuries from accidents are diffuse axonal injury (DAI) and subdural hematoma that both are reported to arise from rotational violence to the head. Most helmet standards used today do only take the translational accelerations into account. It is therefore suggested that an oblique impact test that measures both translational and rotational accelerations should be a complement to the helmet standards used today. This study investigates the potential to reduce the risk for DAI by improving the helmet design by use of an oblique helmet impact test rig. The method used is a detailed finite element (FE) model of the human head. The FE model is used to measure the maximum principal strain in the brain which is suggested as a measurement for the risk to get DAI. The results clearly show the importance of testing a helmet in oblique impacts. Comparing a pure vertical impact with a 45 degree oblique impact with the same initial impact energy shows that the strain in the central parts of the brain is increased with a factor of 6. It is therefore suggested that a future helmet impact standard should include a rotational component so that the helmet is designed for both radial and tangential forces. Such a test method, an oblique impact test, was used to compare two different helmet designs. One helmet was manufactured with the shell glued to the liner and one helmet was designed with a low friction layer between the shell and the liner (MIPS). It was shown that the strain in the FE model of the human head was reduced be 27% comparing the MIPS helmet to the glued helmet design.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003.
National Category
Other Medical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-88691OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-88691DiVA, id: diva2:502481
Conference
RTO Specialist Meeting, the NATO's Research and Technology Organization (RTO)
Note

QC 20181102

NR 20140805

Available from: 2012-02-14 Created: 2012-02-14 Last updated: 2018-11-02Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(263 kB)60 downloads
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a92205de9f1f729b79ddc8d03fe1956a6dfaeaca2aeac6da2db9ee5d534c16eb1cdb2f82012e37d1082d05592b1c6435b8cc52ce8a8dff8391deb7ed00299224
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

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Halldin, PeterAare, MagnusKleiven, Sveinvon Holst, Hans
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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