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Marsyas in the garden?: Small-scale sculptures referring to the Marsyas in the forum
Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.ORCID-id: 0000-0002-2412-5735
2010 (engelsk)Inngår i: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 3, s. 163-178Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

While studying a small-scale sculpture in the collections of the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm, I noticed that it belongs to a previously unrecognized sculpture type. The type depicts a paunchy, bearded satyr who stands with one arm raised. To my knowledge, four replicas exist. By means of stylistic comparison, they can be dated to the late second to early third centuries AD. Due to their scale and rendering they are likely to have been freestanding decorative elements in Roman villas or gardens.

The iconography of the satyrs of the type discussed is closely related to that of a group of fountain figures. These fountain figures are believed to refer to a motif well known in Roman times: the Marsyas in the forum. In this article I argue that the satyrs of the type discussed refer as well to this once famous depiction of Marsyas.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
2010. Vol. 3, s. 163-178
Emneord [en]
Kopienkritik, Copy criticism, Roman visual culture, Roman ideal sculpture, Marsyas in the forum
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
antikens kultur och samhällsliv
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-40257OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-40257DiVA, id: diva2:323134
Tilgjengelig fra: 2010-06-09 Laget: 2010-06-09 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-12bibliografisk kontrollert
Inngår i avhandling
1. Evading Greek models: Three studies on Roman visual culture
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Evading Greek models: Three studies on Roman visual culture
2012 (engelsk)Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

For a long time, Roman ideal sculptures have primarily been studied within the tradition of Kopienkritik. Owing to some of the theoretical assumptions tied to this practice, several important aspects of Roman visual culture have been neglected as the overall aim of such research has been to gain new knowledge regarding assumed Classical and Hellenistic models. This thesis is a collection of three studies on Roman ideal sculpture. The articles share three general aims: 1. To show that the practice of Kopienkritik has, so far, not produced convincing interpretations of the sculpture types and motifs discussed. 2. To show that aspects of the methodology tied to the practice of Kopienkritik (thorough examination and comparison of physical forms in sculptures) can, and should, be used to gain insights other than those concerning hypothetical Classical and Hellenistic model images. 3. To present new interpretations of the sculpture types and motifs studied, interpretations which emphasize their role and importance within Roman visual culture.

The first article shows that reputed, post-Antique restorations may have an unexpected—and unwanted—impact on the study of ancient sculptures. This is examined by tracing the impact that a restored motif ("Satyrs with cymbals") has had on the study of an ancient sculpture type: the satyr ascribed to the two-figure group "The invitation to the dance". The second article presents and interprets a sculpture type which had previously gone unnoticed—The satyrs of "The Palazzo Massimo-type". The type is interpreted as a variant of "The Marsyas in the forum", a motif that was well known within the Roman cultural context. The third article examines how, and why, two motifs known from Classical models were changed in an eclectic fashion once they had been incorporated into Roman visual culture. The motifs concerned are kalathiskos dancers, which were transformed into Victoriae, and pyrrhic dancers, which were also reinterpreted as mythological figures—the curetes.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, 2012. s. 39
Emneord
Kopienkritik, Copy criticism, Emulation, Classical reception studies, Roman visual culture, Roman ideal sculpture, Neo-Attic reliefs
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
antikens kultur och samhällsliv
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-79421 (URN)978-91-7447-557-9 (ISBN)
Disputas
2012-10-16, hörsal 6, hus C, Universitetsvägen 10 C, Stockholm, 10:00 (engelsk)
Opponent
Veileder
Merknad

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 1: Accepted. Paper 3: Accepted.

Tilgjengelig fra: 2012-09-24 Laget: 2012-09-02 Sist oppdatert: 2016-01-22bibliografisk kontrollert

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