Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Increased neurokinin-1 receptor availability in the amygdala in social anxiety disorder: a positron emission tomography study with [11C]GR205171
Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Clinica Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6355-660x
Department of Anesthesiology, Center for Pain and the Brain, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Translational Psychiatry, E-ISSN 2158-3188, Vol. 5, article id e597Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor is abundantly expressed in the fear circuitry of the brain, including the amygdala, where it modulates stress and anxiety. Despite its proposed involvement in psychopathology, only a few studies of NK1 receptor availability in human subjects with anxiety disorders exist. Here, we compared NK1 receptor availability in patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD; n = 17) and healthy controls (n = 17) using positron emission tomography and the radiotracer [11C]GR205171. The Patlak Graphical plot using a cerebellar reference region was used to model the influx parameter, Ki measuring NK1 receptor availability. Voxel-wise statistical parametric mapping analyses revealed increased NK1 receptor availability specifically in the right amygdala in SAD patients relative to controls. Thus, we demonstrate that exaggerated social anxiety is related to enhanced NK1 receptor availability in the amygdala. This finding supports the contribution of NK1 receptors not only in animal models of stress and anxiety but also in humans with anxiety disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2015. Vol. 5, article id e597
National Category
Neurosciences Psychology Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:miun:diva-38885DOI: 10.1038/tp.2015.92ISI: 000367660200004PubMedID: 26151925Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84936875113OAI: oai:DiVA.org:miun-38885DiVA, id: diva2:1423368
Available from: 2020-04-14 Created: 2020-04-14 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(680 kB)531 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 680 kBChecksum SHA-512
877679f271aa1313d79abb40e6f43dd4ae1fe67b13ad6a961673c96d2ab4811d9e945cdee7f12b58b5f4eddbfe1f7ec350ea2d271238dd37f5e01230bd0182f7
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Åhs, Fredrik
In the same journal
Translational Psychiatry
NeurosciencesPsychologyPsychiatry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 531 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 49 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf