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Fast life-histories are associated with larger brain size in killifishes
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3705-1907
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
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Abstract [en]

Comparative studies suggest a negative relationship between pace of life-history, and relative energetic investment into brain size. However, since brain size typically evolves as a correlated response to selection on body size, any lag in brain size evolution will result in a shift in relative brain size (e.g. small body – large relative brain size).Coevolution between body size and life-history hence has the potential to drive secondary associations between relative brain size and life-history, when body size is correlated with life history. However, as far as we know, the relationship between relative brain size and life-history strategy has not been examined in systems that simultaneously present marked contrasts in life-history but no concordant shifts in body size. Using a common garden approach, we test the association between relative brain size and life-history in 21 species of killifish; a study system that fulfils the aforementioned requirements. Contrary to the prediction that brain size evolves through energetic trade-offs with life-history, we found that adults, but not juveniles, of fast-living species had larger relative brain sizes. Rather than an energetic link to life-history, our results suggest that fast- and slow-living species differ in terms of how cognitively demanding environments they inhabit are, or alternatively in the ontogenetic timing of somatic vs. neural growth.

Keywords [en]
Expensive Brain Hypothesis, Energy trade-off Hypothesis, comparative analysis, life-history strategies, trade-offs, relative brain size
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ethology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-169673OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-169673DiVA, id: diva2:1324089
Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
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Eckerström-Liedholm, SimonNäslund, JoacimRowiński, PiotrGonzalez-Voyer, AlejandroRogell, Björn
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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