Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Sound Forest - Evaluation of an Accessible Multisensory Music Installation
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. (Sound and Music Computing)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4422-5223
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KMH Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden. (Sound and Music Computing)
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. (Sound and Music Computing)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4259-484X
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. (Sound and Music Computing)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2659-0411
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM , 2019, p. 1-12, article id 677Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Sound Forest is a music installation consisting of a room with light-emitting interactive strings, vibrating platforms and speakers, situated at the Swedish Museum of Performing Arts. In this paper we present an exploratory study focusing on evaluation of Sound Forest based on picture cards and interviews. Since Sound Forest should be accessible for everyone, regardless age or abilities, we invited children, teens and adults with physical and intellectual disabilities to take part in the evaluation. The main contribution of this work lies in its fndings suggesting that multisensory platforms such as Sound Forest, providing whole-body vibrations, can be used to provide visitors of diferent ages and abilities with similar associations to musical experiences. Interviews also revealed positive responses to haptic feedback in this context. Participants of diferent ages used diferent strategies and bodily modes of interaction in Sound Forest, with activities ranging from running to synchronized music-making and collaborative play.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM , 2019. p. 1-12, article id 677
Series
CHI ’19
Keywords [en]
accessible digital musical instruments, evaluation of music systems, haptic feedback, music installations, music production
National Category
Media and Communication Technology Interaction Technologies Media Engineering Human Computer Interaction Music
Research subject
Media Technology; Human-computer Interaction; Art, Technology and Design
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-250780DOI: 10.1145/3290605.3300907ISI: 000474467908056OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-250780DiVA, id: diva2:1313773
Conference
CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Projects
Ljudskogen
Note

QC 20190625

Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2019-07-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full texthttp://doi.acm.org/10.1145/3290605.3300907

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Frid, EmmaLindetorp, HansHansen, Kjetil FalkenbergElblaus, LudvigBresin, Roberto
By organisation
Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID
Media and Communication TechnologyInteraction TechnologiesMedia EngineeringHuman Computer InteractionMusic

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 303 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf