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‘I also want to be vaccinated!’ –: adolescent boys’ awareness and thoughts, perceived benefits, information sources, and intention to be vaccinated against Human papillomavirus (HPV)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4590-4957
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8050-621x
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2018 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study investigates boys' awareness and thoughts about human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV vaccination, perceived benefits of vaccinating men, information sources and intention to be vaccinated against HPV. We used a qualitative approach and interviews were conducted with 31 upper secondary school male students. Two main themes 1) Promotion of equal health and 2) Increased knowledge facilitates the decision about HPV vaccination emerged from the analysis. The informants believed that it was important and fair to protect boys and girls equally against HPV. If HPV vaccination could prevent both girls and boys against an HPV-related disease, there was nothing to question or to discuss. It was not a matter of sex; it was a matter of equal rights. Moreover, an important reason for vaccinating boys was to prevent the transmission of the virus. However, the boys felt unsure and stated that they needed to know more. The school nurse and the school health were considered suitable both for distributing information and for providing the vaccinations. In conclusion, the participants were in favor of introducing HPV vaccination also for boys in the national vaccination program. Sex-neutral HPV vaccinations were viewed both as a way to stop the virus transmission and a means to promote equal health for the entire population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371524DOI: 10.1080/21645515.2018.1551670OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-371524DiVA, id: diva2:1273464
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-04-26Bibliographically approved

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Grandahl, MariaNevéus, TryggveLarsson, MargaretaTydén, TanjaStenhammar, Christina
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Obstetrics and Reproductive Health ResearchDepartment of Women's and Children's Health
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

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