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Patient reported outcome of pain after tonsil surgery: An analysis of 32,225 children from the National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden 2009-2016
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care. (CPoN)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4718-3361
Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Ajman, United Arab Emirates.
Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Huddinge.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. (CPoN)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8549-9039
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The objective of this register study was to explore factors affecting pain after pediatric tonsil surgery, using patient-reported outcomes from questionnaires in the National Tonsil Surgery Registry in Sweden, 30 days after surgery.

Material and method: A total of 32,225 tonsil surgeries on children (aged 1-18 years) during 2009-2016 were included; 13,904 tonsillectomies with or without adenoidectomy (TE±A) and 18,321 tonsillotomies with or without adenoidectomy (TT±A). Pain was evaluated by using patient-reported outcomes from questionnaires in the National Tonsil Surgery Registry in Sweden, 30 days after surgery. Results: In surgery cases of indication obstruction, the TT±A stopped taking painkillers and returned to normal eating habits sooner, and had less contact with health care services due to pain, compared to TE±A. After TE±A, the indication infection group had more days on analgesics and more contacts with health care services due to pain, compared to the indication obstruction group. TE±A with cold-dissection technique resulted in fewer days on painkillers compared to warm-technique, and reduced the number of contacts with health care services due to pain. Older children were affected by more days of morbidity than the younger ones, but there was no gender difference after adjustment for age, dissection technique and hemostasis technique. Implementation of national guidelines for pain treatment (2013) and patient information on the website tonsilloperation.se seems to have increased the days on analgesics after surgery.

Conclusion: Pain after tonsil surgery depends on the surgical procedure and technique, as well as factors such as the patient’s age and surgical indication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified Nursing
Research subject
Anaesthesiology; Oto-Rhino-Laryngology; Caring Sciences w. Medical Focus
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69768OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-69768DiVA, id: diva2:1257813
Conference
XXXIII Congress of the Nordic Association of Otolaryngology, Gothenburg, Sweden May 31 - June 3, 2017
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved

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