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Unique associations of the Job Demand-Control-Support model subscales with leisure-time physical activity and dietary energy intake.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. (Public Health)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3249-3383
School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Australia.
School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, Australia.
Appleton Institute for Behavioural Science, Central Queensland University, Australia.
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2018 (English)In: Industrial Health, ISSN 0019-8366, E-ISSN 1880-8026Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and dietary energy intake are two important health behaviours, which at too low or high levels respectively, are associated with overweight and obesity. This study explores associations between subscales of the Job Demand-Control-Support (JDCS) model, LTPA and dietary energy intake. A cross-sectional design sampled current employees (N=433) from a South Australian cohort using a computer-assisted telephone interview and a self-completed food frequency questionnaire. In analyses adjusted for sex, age, and sociodemographic variables, higher levels of skill discretion were associated with increased odds for attaining sufficient physical activity (OR=2.45; 95% CI=1.10-5.47). Higher levels of decision authority were associated with reduced odds (OR=0.43; 95% CI=0.20-0.93) for being in the highest tertile of daily energy intake. Higher scores for coworker support were associated with increased odds (OR=2.20; 95% CI=1.15-4.23) for being in the highest tertile of daily energy intake. These findings support the consideration of the individual JDCS subscales, since this practice may reveal novel associations with health behaviour outcomes, thereby presenting new opportunities to improve employee health and wellbeing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
Keywords [en]
Diet, Energy intake, Leisure-time physical activity, Obesity, Work stress
National Category
Work Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356743DOI: 10.2486/indhealth.2017-0196ISI: 000458919900012PubMedID: 30068894OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-356743DiVA, id: diva2:1236833
Available from: 2018-08-06 Created: 2018-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-01Bibliographically approved

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