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Fluoride removal by nanofiltration and reverse osmosis: impact of pH, organic and inorganic carbon
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

High fluoride (F) levels in drinking water can result in fluorosis. The WHO recommends F limit of 1.5 mg/L in drinking water, however, up to 300 mg/L has been recorded [1]. The issue of high F levels usually occurs in rural areas in developing country where alternative sources are unavailable. Nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) efficient in remove inorganic contaminant including F, as well as organic and microbial contaminants, simultaneously. The main quality parameters of fluoride-rich waters are pH, inorganic carbon (IC) and organic matter content [2]. The study has sought to understand the complexity of removing F and OM from tropical natural waters. The mechanisms of the impact of IC, speciation and organic carbon on F and OM removal NF/RO by over a wide pH range 2-12, have been explored. Two NF/RO membranes, namely NF270 and BW30 were studied, by experimenting with synthetic and Tanzania natural waters with varying OM, IC concentration but similar F concentration of 50 mg/L. F retention by NF/RO increased with pH increase due to speciation and membrane surface charge. As expected, the BW30 membrane which is a ‘tight’ membrane, removed F better (80-99%) than the NF270 membrane (20-85%) at pH ≥4. IC reduced F retention by NF270 from 80% to 70% at pH >10 where IC exists as divalent CO32− and was retained more easily than the monovalent F−. OM enhanced the retention of F by both NF/RO membranes at pH > 7 [3]. The enhancement effect was attributed to an increase in surface charge due to OM presence. The F and IC results of synthetic waters were in agreement with that obtained with Tanzanian natural waters. The study has shown that in implementing appropriate membrane technology in rural areas where water quality is variable, the mechanism of F and OM retention can be different.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-232721OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-232721DiVA, id: diva2:1236129
Conference
5th KIT PhD SymposiumAt: Karlsruhe, Germany, September 19, 2017.
Note

QC 20180808

Available from: 2018-07-31 Created: 2018-07-31 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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