Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Time Shifting and Agile Time Boxes in Course Design
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
2017 (English)In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 88-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ongoing integration of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) into higher education courses is often called blended learning although it often relates to course design. It is usually understood in place categories, as a combination of traditional classroom-based sessions and Internet-enabled distance or online learning practices. One alternative understanding of ICT integration can be constructed of time categories, with an understanding of ICTs more as process- and project-related. Two such design frameworks are conceptually presented and then used together in a small case study in a pilot experiment in physics at the preparatory level for entering engineering programs at a university in Northern Sweden. These are a) time shift mechanisms between synchronous and asynchronous learning modes in the course process and b) agile frameworks mechanisms adapted from work process developments in the software industry. Both are here used to address common procrastination problems in flexible education. Data were collected in student interviews and analysed with qualitative content analysis. Results show student satisfaction with the work rhythm and that a feeling of presence, which enables easy interaction, can be facilitated by synchronicity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Athabasca University Press , 2017. Vol. 18, no 6, p. 88-103
Keyword [en]
blended learning
National Category
Pedagogy Learning
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130595ISI: 000418520900006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-130595DiVA, id: diva2:1068459
Note

Originally published in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2017-01-25 Created: 2017-01-25 Last updated: 2018-01-15Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. From blended learning to learning onlife: ICTs, time and access in higher education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From blended learning to learning onlife: ICTs, time and access in higher education
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Information and Communication Technologies, ICTs, has now for decades being increasingly taken into use for higher education, enabling distance learning, e-learning and online learning, mainly in parallel to mainstream educational practise. The concept Blended learning (BL) aims at the integration of ICTs with these existing educational practices. The term is frequently used, but there is no agreed-upon definition. The general aim of this dissertation is to identify new possible perspectives on ICTs and access to higher education, for negotiating the dichotomy between campus-based and ICT-enabled education. The access options of BL are in focus for this dissertation, although BL is generally seen as a campus phenomenon, and shares a place perspective. The main research questions in the dissertation are 1) how BL can be understood in the context of increased access to education, moreover, (2) how time can be work as a more constructive perspective for designing ICTs in education, compared to place. The dissertation comprises five articles. The first is conceptual and concentrates on place and time in blended learning, and forms a time-based model and perspective, drawing on the tension between synchronous and asynchronous modalities instead of a place-based center-periphery model. The following article examines the differences between North American and European use of the term BL, in education and research, and finds that BL is not much used by European researchers, although the term is frequently used in educational environments. Two design and intervention studies, articles 3 and 4, make experiments using the BL time-based model. In article 3, a group of untraditional learners at a learning centre in Arvidsjaur attends a synchronous co-located study circle group and participates in an asynchronous and global Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). In article 4, nine students in a preparatory year for entering engineering studies volunteer and participate in a pilot distance course experiment, where prevention of procrastination is a high priority. For this, agile framework theory, constructivist learning theory and the time-based model are used in design and analysis. The last article (5) reconnects learning to place by discussing and adapting Triple- and Quadruple Helix theory for regional development in the knowledge society to four regional European cases. At the end of the synthesis, an outline of the access affordances with the time-based model is given, drawing on Adam’s timescape theory. The discussion of ICT integration into education is made drawing on Floridi’s Philosophy of Information, which provides many tools to view discourses of ICTs in education critically, and also envisions the concept of e-ducation in the infosphere, where other blend issues appear connected to weak artificial intelligence and the pervasive power of ICTs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2017. p. 96 + 7
Series
Doktorsavhandlingar i pedagogiskt arbete, ISSN 1650-8858 ; 72
Series
The Post-Graduate School of the Educational Sciences ; 17
Keyword
blended learning, distance learning, e-learning, online learning, ICTs, synchronous learning, asynchronous learning, philosophy of information, learning onlife
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130567 (URN)978-91-7601-622-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-02-16, N320, Naturvetarhuset, plan 3, Johan Bures väg 16, Umeå, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-01-26 Created: 2017-01-23 Last updated: 2017-01-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(504 kB)8 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 504 kBChecksum SHA-512
d8c894068fb506bc453e244f695135009e8852e60d98fb7377e5df6082f4886f40b7d97d12909b3ec5fefc8147b1ed3d969eed65eaf0b153bbd7febfa4836912
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

URL

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Norberg, Anders
By organisation
Department of applied educational science
In the same journal
International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning
PedagogyLearning

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 8 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 84 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf