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Polarimetry and flux distribution in the debris disk around HD 32297
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
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Number of Authors: 522016 (English)In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 593, article id A73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present high-contrast angular differential imaging (ADI) observations of the debris disk around HD32297 in H-band, as well as the first polarimetric images for this system in polarized differential imaging (PDI) mode with Subaru/HICIAO. In ADI, we detect the nearly edge-on disk at > 5 sigma levels from similar to 0.45 '' to similar to 1.7 '' (50-192AU) from the star and recover the spine deviation from the midplane already found in previous works. We also find for the first time imaging and surface brightness (SB) indications for the presence of a gapped structure on both sides of the disk at distances of similar to 0.75 '' (NE side) and similar to 0.65 '' (SW side). Global forward-modelling work delivers a best-fit model disk and well-fitting parameter intervals that essentially match previous results, with high-forward scattering grains and a ring located at 110AU. However, this single ring model cannot account for the gapped structure seen in our SB profiles. We create simple double ring models and achieve a satisfactory fit with two rings located at 60 and 95AU, respectively, low-forward scattering grains and very sharp inner slopes. In polarized light we retrieve the disk extending from similar to 0.25-1.6 '', although the central region is quite noisy and high S/N are only found in the range similar to 0.75-1.2 ''. The disk is polarized in the azimuthal direction, as expected, and the departure from the midplane is also clearly observed. Evidence for a gapped scenario is not found in the PDI data. We obtain a linear polarization degree of the grains that increases from similar to 10% at 0.55 '' to similar to 25% at 1.6 ''. The maximum is found at scattering angles of similar to 90 degrees, either from the main components of the disk or from dust grains blown out to larger radii.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 593, article id A73
Keywords [en]
protoplanetary disks, techniques: high angular resolution, stars: individual: HD 32297
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Research subject
Astronomy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-136939DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201628543ISI: 000385820100081OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-136939DiVA, id: diva2:1060671
Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2019-01-21Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. High-contrast imaging of low-mass companions and debris disks
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-contrast imaging of low-mass companions and debris disks
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The search for exoplanets, i.e., planets orbiting other stars than the Sun, is a relatively new research field, but has already established itself as one of the most prolific and intriguing areas of astronomy. By now we are in a situation where the focus is not only on finding companions to stars, but also on characterising their atmospheres and physical properties, which overall allows us to put our Solar System into context. In the near future, these efforts could potentially lead to the first confirmation of a life-bearing planet besides the Earth. 

The great majority of these exoplanet studies have been carried out indirectly, where the presence and characterisation of the companions are inferred solely from the observation of the host star. In the last decade, however, high-contrast direct imaging has been continuously developed to get rid of the starlight and reveal the existence of low-mass companions. Although this technique is currently limited to giant planets orbiting at large separations, it is able to directly detect the light emitted or scattered off the planet’s atmosphere at high signal to noise, which makes it the most promising planet-hunting method to characterise new worlds. Moreover, its capability to image faint objects close to the parent star allows for not only the detection of planetary-mass companions, but also low-mass stars, brown dwarfs, and circumstellar disks where planet formation takes place. This opens up a broad range of science cases where direct observations can be used to understand planet formation, atmospheric physics and stellar evolution.      

In this PhD thesis I provide an up-to-date introduction to the basis of the direct imaging technique, and explain the star and planet formation mechanisms. Three publications are attached to this introduction, each of them dealing with distinct science cases that can be  assessed with high-contrast observations. In Paper I we resolve and model the aftermath of star formation, the so-called debris disk phase analogue to the asteroid and Kuiper belts in our Solar System, around the HD 32297 star with Subaru/HiCIAO.  We reveal an edge-on disk and find the first indications of a double-ring scenario. We also present the first polarimetric study of this system, constraining the properties of the dust around the star.  In Paper II we focus on the planetary-mass regime, and conduct the first direct imaging survey searching for circumbinary planets orbiting tight binary systems (SPOTS: Search for Planets Orbiting Two Stars). We present the results of the observations of 62 targets with VLT/NaCo and VLT/SPHERE, and perform a statistical analysis on the findings, placing constraints on the population of giant planets and brown dwarfs on wide orbits. Finally, in Paper III we resolve a triple stellar system with the newly-commissioned SCExAO/CHARIS integral field spectrograph. Taking advantage of the coeval nature of the system and the different range of masses involved, we use the data to reaffirm a previously suggested isochronal age discrepancy between the low- and the intermediate-mass population of stars.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, 2019. p. 74
Keywords
Direct imaging, extrasolar planets, debris disks, planet formation, high angular resolution
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Research subject
Astronomy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-163784 (URN)978-91-7797-558-8 (ISBN)978-91-7797-559-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-03-15, sal FB52, AlbaNova universitetscentrum, Roslagstullsbacken 21, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
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Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following paper was unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 3: In press.

Available from: 2019-02-20 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-02-06Bibliographically approved

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