Endre søk
RefereraExporteraLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Attachment Patterns of Human and Avian Influenza Viruses to Trachea and Colon of 26 Bird Species: Support for the Community Concept
Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. (Zoonosis Science Center)
Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk och experimentell patologi.ORCID-id: 0000-0001-5611-1015
Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biokemi och mikrobiologi. (Zoonosis Science Center)
Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst, Kalmar, Sweden.
Vise andre og tillknytning
2019 (engelsk)Inngår i: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 10, artikkel-id 815Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Avian influenza A viruses (AIVs) have a broad host range, but are most intimately associated with waterfowl (Anseriformes) and, in the case of the H13 and H16 subtypes, gulls (Charadriiformes). Host associations are multifactorial, but a key factor is the ability of the virus to bind host cell receptors and thereby initiate infection. The current study aims at investigating the tissue attachment pattern of a panel of AIVs, comprising H3N2, H6N1, H12N5, and H16N3, to avian trachea and colon tissue samples obtained from host species of different orders. Virus attachment was not restricted to the bird species or order from which the virus was isolated. Instead, extensive virus attachment was observed to several distantly related avian species. In general, more virus attachment and receptor expression were observed in trachea than in colon samples. Additionally, a human seasonal H3N2 virus was studied. Unlike the studied AIVs, this virus mainly attached to tracheae from Charadriiformes and a very limited set of avian cola. In conclusion, the reported results highlight the importance of AIV attachment to trachea in many avian species. Finally, the importance of chickens and mallards in AIVs dynamics was illustrated by the abundant AIV attachment observed.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
2019. Vol. 10, artikkel-id 815
Emneord [en]
virus histochemistry, lectin staining, pattern of virus attachment, avian influenza, birds
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382841DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2019.00815ISI: 000464963200002PubMedID: 31057520OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-382841DiVA, id: diva2:1317235
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03877Swedish Research Council, 2016-02596Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Merknad

De 2 första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-05-22 Laget: 2019-05-22 Sist oppdatert: 2019-10-24bibliografisk kontrollert
Inngår i avhandling
1. Avian Influenza Virus: Deciphering receptor interactions and their role in interspecies transmission
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Avian Influenza Virus: Deciphering receptor interactions and their role in interspecies transmission
2019 (engelsk)Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

Influenza A virus (IAV) annually infects approximately 5–15 % of the human population, causing ~500,000 deaths globally. Novel IAVs have emerged and spread pandemically in the human population, but have over time established endemic circulation with reduced pathogenicity causing seasonal influenza. The natural reservoir of IAVs is wild waterfowl. The past pandemics have been associated with host switch and have partly or entirely originated from birds, or adapted via passage through pigs (postulated IAV mixing vessel). Understanding IAV interspecies transmission mechanisms is essential for pandemic preparedness. Enzootic circulation of avian IAV (AIV) is concentrated to a few waterfowl species, while other bird species seldom are infected. A species barrier preventing IAV interspecies transmission has been suggested. To investigate IAV host range and mixing vessels, histochemistry studies were conducted with tissues from avian species, pigs, and humans. Virus adaptation to new hosts was studied by challenging tufted ducks and chickens with mallard-derived AIVs, together with AIV receptor tropism and glycoproteomic analysis of receptor distribution. Finally, receptor and tissue tropism in ducks was studied systematically for AIV (H1–16). More abundant AIV attachment to human than pig tissues was observed, questioning the pig mixing vessel theory. Attachment patterns of AIVs to bird tissues was generally broad with abundant attachment to trachea. However, among ducks, pronounced attachment was observed to colon of Anas spp., suggesting that intestinal infection might be restricted to Anas spp., whereas other species may be susceptible to respiratory infection. Tufted ducks and chickens could not be infected by intraesophageal inoculation further supporting this hypothesis. Glycan array analysis revealed 3’SLN, 3’STF, and their fucosylated and sulfated analogues as main AIV receptors. Moreover, AIV Neu5Acα2,6 recognition was widespread. Avian respiratory and intestinal tracts glycoproteomic analysis revealed that avian and mammalian receptor structures are much more similar than earlier thought. Furthermore, observed AIV subtype titer variation in challenged tufted ducks and chickens did not correlate with virus receptor tropism. In summary, this thesis suggests that IAV receptor recognition, in particular α2,3 vs. α2,6 sialylated receptor structures, is less important for the IAV interspecies barrier than previously thought.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2019. s. 72
Serie
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 1609
Emneord
birds, glycobiology, glycovirology, host range, mixing vessel, virus attachment
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Medicinsk virologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395407 (URN)978-91-513-0797-8 (ISBN)
Disputas
2019-12-14, Trippelrummet, Navet, SciLifeLab, BMC, Husargatan 3, Uppsala, 09:15 (engelsk)
Opponent
Veileder
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-11-21 Laget: 2019-10-24 Sist oppdatert: 2019-11-21

Open Access i DiVA

fulltekst(2853 kB)54 nedlastinger
Filinformasjon
Fil FULLTEXT01.pdfFilstørrelse 2853 kBChecksum SHA-512
e8dc999ee91f4fba6be34fb2b0cf51bb6ef5ad84daffdc332488695b5802625db1460be84e648912b534a567f58d40b5be49926044b36d23ebc25d1506d2c990
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Andre lenker

Forlagets fulltekstPubMed

Søk i DiVA

Av forfatter/redaktør
Eriksson, PerLindskog, CeciliaJärhult, Josef D.Lundkvist, ÅkeOlsen, BjörnEllström, Patrik
Av organisasjonen
I samme tidsskrift
Frontiers in Microbiology

Søk utenfor DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Totalt: 54 nedlastinger
Antall nedlastinger er summen av alle nedlastinger av alle fulltekster. Det kan for eksempel være tidligere versjoner som er ikke lenger tilgjengelige

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Totalt: 142 treff
RefereraExporteraLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf