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Affective Brain Signal Variability Separates Social Anxiety Disorder Patients From Healthy Individuals
Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Psykologiska institutionen, Klinisk psykologi.
Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Psykologiska institutionen.
Vise andre og tillknytning
2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 83, nr 9, s. S249-S250Artikkel i tidsskrift, Meeting abstract (Annet vitenskapelig) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Amygdala hyper-responsiveness to negative socio-affective stimuli have typically been demonstrated in patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). Relative to conventional methods, there is emerging evidence that brain signal variability could be a better predictor of behavior than mean neural response.

Methods: We recruited 46 patients with SAD (mean age 31, 63% females) and 40 matched healthy controls (HC) to undergo 3 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 2 time-points, totaling 172 MRIsessions. Blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD-fMRI) was performed while viewing happy and fearful faces in blocks of 80 seconds. BOLD-fMRI data was reviewed by manually classifying signal from noise. Variability was calculated as each voxel’s standard deviation on signal across scanning-time. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) estimated patterns of variability that separates patient from controls.

Results: PLS found one significant latent variable with cross-block covariance on 64%, permutated (x 1000) P<0.001, bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals on each condition, demonstrating less signal variability to happy faces in patients, relative to controls. This pattern of response was spatially located in several regions across the whole-brain, with large clusters appearing in bilateral amygdala, medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus.

Conclusions: We found that neural response variability to positive socio-affective stimuli accurately separated patients from controls. It is likely that less signal variability highlights a deficit in effective emotion processing. We add to the growing literature on healthy individuals suggesting that task-specific brain signal variability contains useful information. The brain signal variability approach opens new avenues to evaluate and better understand brain function in common psychopathology.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
2018. Vol. 83, nr 9, s. S249-S250
Emneord [en]
social anxiety disorder, BOLD fMRI, variability
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
psykologi
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-160600DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.02.644OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-160600DiVA, id: diva2:1251838
Konferanse
The 73rd Annual Meeting of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, New York, US, May 10-12, 2018
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-09-28 Laget: 2018-09-28 Sist oppdatert: 2018-09-28bibliografisk kontrollert

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