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Emerging Viral Infections in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Developing Nervous System: A Mini Review
Makerere Univ, Uganda;Mulago Hosp, Uganda.
Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för Hälso- och livsvetenskap (FHL), Institutionen för psykologi (PSY).
Karolinska Institutet.
Uniformed Serv Univ Hlth Sci, USA.
Vise andre og tillknytning
2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: Frontiers in Neurology, ISSN 1664-2295, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 9, artikkel-id 82Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

The global public health concern is heightened over the increasing number of emerging viruses, i.e., newly discovered or previously known that have expanded into new geographical zones. These viruses challenge the health-care systems in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) countries from which several of them have originated and been transmitted by insects worldwide. Some of these viruses are neuroinvasive, but have been relatively neglected by neuroscientists. They may provide experiments by nature to give a time window for exposure to a new virus within sizeable, previously non-infected human populations, which, for instance, enables studies on potential long-term or late-onset effects on the developing nervous system. Here, we briefly summarize studies on the developing brain by West Nile, Zika, and Chikungunya viruses, which are mosquito-borne and have spread worldwide out of SSA. They can all be neuroinvasive, but their effects vary from malformations caused by prenatal infections to cognitive disturbances following perinatal or later infections. We also highlight Ebola virus, which can leave surviving children with psychiatric disturbances and cause persistent infections in the non-human primate brain. Greater awareness within the neuroscience community is needed to emphasize the menace evoked by these emerging viruses to the developing brain. In particular, frontline neuroscience research should include neuropediatric follow-up studies in the field on long-term or late-onset cognitive and behavior disturbances or neuropsychiatric disorders. Studies on pathogenetic mechanisms for viral-induced perturbations of brain maturation should be extended to the vulnerable periods when neurocircuit formations are at peaks during infancy and early childhood.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018. Vol. 9, artikkel-id 82
Emneord [en]
developing nervous system, emerging viruses, Ebola virus, Chikungunya virus, West Nile virus, Zika virus, neurological disorders, sub-Saharan Africa
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Samhällsvetenskap, Psykologi
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-71553DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2018.00082ISI: 000425991700001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85042452816OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-71553DiVA, id: diva2:1190996
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-03-16 Laget: 2018-03-16 Sist oppdatert: 2019-08-29bibliografisk kontrollert

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