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To sell or not to sell: Overweight users’ effect on fashion assortments
Högskolan i Halmstad, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0419-8654
2010 (English)In: Journal of Brand Management, ISSN 1350-231X, E-ISSN 1479-1803, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 66-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Overweight people claim to be mistreated by the fashion industry. Fashion companies disagree. Despite the controversy, actual research has been scarce. This study compares the sizes of clothes that the four leading mass-marketing fashion retailers in Sweden offer to the body sizes of the population. Although branding theory would support the idea of rejecting fat consumers to improve user imagery for fashion brands, such practices were not evident. The main contribution of this article is that it provides the first quantified empirical evidence on the theory of typical user imagery. In the discussion, it is posited that, although mass-market fashion brands should be susceptible to negative user imagery related to overweight and obese users, the companies avoid such problems by making garments that are not directly attributable to a specific brand, thus mitigating the negative effect of overweight and obese user imagery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan , 2010. Vol. 18, no 1, p. 66-78
Keywords [en]
assortments, brands, fashion, product and brand management
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-54549DOI: 10.1057/bm.2010.23Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77956455294OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-54549DiVA, id: diva2:1591348
Available from: 2011-01-26 Created: 2021-09-06 Last updated: 2021-09-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. It’s Not What You Sell: It’s Whom You Sell it To: How the Customer’s Character Shapes Brands and What Companies Do About it
Open this publication in new window or tab >>It’s Not What You Sell: It’s Whom You Sell it To: How the Customer’s Character Shapes Brands and What Companies Do About it
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this dissertation I investigate the effects of user and usage imagery on brands and how businesses employ user imagery to build brands. Over four articles I present results that suggest that user imagery affects brand personality and that companies under certain conditions adapt their behavior to optimize this effect. Although both mass market fashion and nightclubs are susceptible to the influence of user imagery, out of the two only nightclubs actively reject customers to improve its effect on brand perception. I relate these practices to the practical and financial feasibility of rejecting customers, the character of nightclubs’ brands, and to their inability to differentiate their brands through any other brand personality influencer besides user imagery. In this dissertation, I also discuss the ethical ramifications of user imagery optimization through customer rejection. In one study, the role of conspicuous usage imagery on socially desirable consumer behavior is investigated. It is concluded that conspicuousness increases consumers' propensity to choose environmentally friendly products, and that this tendency is especially pronounced for individuals that are high in attention to social comparison information. The conclusion is that consumers use green products to self-enhance for the purpose of fitting in with the group rather than to stand out from it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Förlag Göteborgs Universitet, 2015. p. 120
Keywords
brands, self-image congruity, brand personality, user imagery, fashion, nightclubs, green consumer behavior, self-monitoring ability, attention to social comparison information, ATSCI
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-54563 (URN)978-91-7246-341-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-09-07 Created: 2021-09-07 Last updated: 2021-09-07Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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