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Brain size is reduced by selectionfor tameness in Red Junglefowl–correlated effects in vital organs
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5508-4465
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, 3306Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During domestication animals have undergone changes in size of brain and other vital organs. We hypothesize that this could be a correlated effect to increased tameness. Red Junglefowl (ancestors of domestic chickens) were selected for divergent levels of fear of humans for five generations. The parental (P0) and the fifth selected generation (S5) were culled when 48–54 weeks old and the brains were weighed before being divided into telencephalon, cerebellum, mid brain and optic lobes. Each single brain part as well as the liver, spleen, heart and testicles were also weighed. Brains of S5 birds with high fear scores (S5 high) were heavier both in absolute terms and when corrected for body weight. The relative weight of telencephalon (% of brain weight) was significantly higher in S5 high and relative weight of cerebellum was lower. Heart, liver, testes and spleen were all relatively heavier (% of body weight) in S5 high. Hence, selection for tameness has changed the size of the brain and other vital organs in this population and may have driven the domesticated phenotype as a correlated response.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2017. Vol. 7, 3306
National Category
Neurosciences Other Medical Engineering Zoology Evolutionary Biology Neurology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-138189DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-03236-4ISI: 000403081900097OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-138189DiVA: diva2:1108425
Note

Funding agencies: research council Formas; ERC [322206 GENEWELL]

Available from: 2017-06-12 Created: 2017-06-12 Last updated: 2017-07-05Bibliographically approved

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