2345678 201 - 250 of 1305
rss atomLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
  • Biberg, Nils Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Specimen academicum artificii historiæ Herodoteæ ideam sistens quod venia ampl. fac. phil. Ups. p. p. mag. Nicolaus Fr. Biberg ... et J. A. Westman Bothniensis. In audit. Gustaviano die XXVIII Febr. MDCCCX. H. a. m. s.1810No name for locale no (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • Biberg, Nils Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Specimen academicum primas stationes progredientis in philosophia recentiore idealismi adumbrans venia ampliss. fac. philos. Upsal. publico examini subjicit mag. Nicolaus Fr. Biberg ... respondente Johanne Laur. Dufva nobili Smolando in audit. Gustaviano die XXX Nov. MDCCCVIII h. a. m. s.1808No name for locale no (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • Biberg, Nils Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Specimen academicum, progressuum æsthetices cum cultura philosophiæ connexum exhibens. Cujus partem I. cons. ampliss. fac. philos. Upsal. publico examini deferunt mag. Nic. Frieder. Biberg, stip. Stiegl. et Simon Andreas Cronstrand, Ostrogothus. In audit. Gust. maj. d. 13 Dec. 1798. H. a. m. s.1798No name for locale no (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • Biberg, Nils Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    De indole et progressu cultus Europæi hodierni dissertatio, cujus partem quartam cons. ampliss. fac. philos. Ups. publico examini deferunt mag. Nic. Frieder. Biberg, stip. Stiegl. et Johannes Petrus Eurén, stip. reg. Westrobothniensis. In audit. Gust. maj. d. 13 Jun. 1798. h. p. m. c., p. 41798No name for locale no (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • Biberg, Nils Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    De indole et progressu cultus Europæi hodierni dissertatio, cujus partem tertiam cons. ampliss. fac. philos. Ups. publico examini deferunt. Mag. Nic. Frieder. Biberg, stip. Stiegl. et Jonas Svedbom, Angermanni. In audit. Gust. maj. d. 13 Jun. 1798. H. a. m. c., p. 31798No name for locale no (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • Disputas: 2018-03-02 13:00 Enghoffsalen, Uppsala
    Bagge, Louise
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiologi-arrytmi.
    Surgical ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation in different patient populations: A study of clinical outcomes including rhythm, quality of life, atrial function and safety2018Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have markedly reduced quality of life (QoL) and catheter ablation has become a useful tool in the rhythm control therapy. However, because of the poor outcome for patients with persistent AF, new surgical ablation strategies for rhythm control are emerging.

    The aims of this thesis were to evaluate QoL, the main indication for rhythm control, after three different types of surgical ablation for AF, two stand-alone epicardial AF ablation procedures and one concomitant procedure during mitral valve surgery (MVS), and to perform a long-term follow-up of one of the techniques with regard to rhythm outcome, left atrial function, exercise capacity and safety.

    As the first center in the Nordic countries to adopt the video-assisted epicardial pulmonary vein isolation and ganglionated plexi ablation combined with left atrial appendage excision (LAA), the  freedom from AF at one year follow-up was found to be 71% and associated with improved exercise capacity, QoL and symptoms as well as preserved left atrial function and size. The most common complication was bleeding events (14%). After 10 years, the improved symptoms and QoL remained, reaching comparable levels of the general Swedish population, despite a marked decline in the rate of freedom from AF (36%). 4 strokes appeared during follow-up despite LAA excision in 3 of these patients.

    In order to improve the rhythm outcome for patients with longstanding persistent AF a box-lesion was added to the procedure. At one year follow-up, both symptoms and QoL improved and was indistinguishable from those in the Swedish general population.

    Finally, concomitant AF ablation during MVS did not improve QoL compared to MVS alone in a double blinded randomized controlled trial. Moreover, no difference was seen between patients in AF or sinus rhythm at one year follow-up, irrespective of the allocated therapy, indicating that their preoperative symptoms were mainly related to their valve disease.

    In conclusion, the stand-alone procedures using surgical ablation was found to be effective but at the expense of procedural complications. In contrast, the concomitant surgical AF ablation did not improve QoL, a finding that raises concerns regarding current recommendations for this procedure. 

  • Wang, Jiangrong
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Andrae, Bengt
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sundstrom, Karin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ploner, Alexander
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Strom, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Elfstrom, K. Miriam
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dillner, Joakim
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Univ Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sparen, Par
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Effectiveness of cervical screening after age 60 years according to screening history: Nationwide cohort study in Sweden2017Inngår i: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 14, nr 10, artikkel-id e1002414Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The relatively high incidence of cervical cancer in women at older ages is a continuing concern in countries with long-established cervical screening. Controversy remains on when and how to cease screening. Existing population-based studies on the effectiveness of cervical screening at older ages have not considered women's screening history. We performed a nationwide cohort study to investigate the incidence of cervical cancer after age 60 years and its association with cervical screening at age 61-65, stratified by screening history at age 51-60. Methods and findings Using the Total Population Register, we identified 569,132 women born between 1 January 1919 and 31 December 1945, resident in Sweden since age 51. Women's cytological screening records, cervical cancer occurrence, and FIGO stage (for those diagnosed with cancer) were retrieved from national registers and medical charts. We calculated the cumulative incidence of cervical cancer from age 61 to age 80 using a survival function considering competing risk, and estimated the hazard ratio (HR) of cervical cancer in relation to screening status at age 61-65 from Cox models, adjusted for birth cohort and level of education, conditioning on women's screening history in their 50s. In women unscreened in their 50s, the cumulative incidence up to age 80 was 5.0 per 1,000 women, and screening at age 61-65 was associated with a lower risk for cervical cancer (HR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.24-0.72), corresponding to a decrease of 3.3 cancer cases per 1,000 women. A higher cumulative incidence and similarly statistically significant risk decrease was seen for women with abnormal smears in their 50s. In women adequately or inadequately screened with only normal results between age 51 and age 60, the cumulative incidence of cervical cancer from age 61 to 80 was 1.6 and 2.5 per 1,000 women, respectively, and further screening at age 61-65 was not associated with statistically significant decreases of cervical cancer risk up to age 80, but with fewer cancer cases of advanced stages at age 61-65. Adjustment for potential lifestyle confounders was limited. Conclusions In this study, cervical screening with cytology at age 61-65 was associated with a statistically significant reduction of subsequent cervical cancer risk for women who were unscreened, or screened with abnormalities, in their 50s. In women screened with normal results in their 50s, the risk for future cancer was not sizeable, and the risk reduction associated with continued screening appeared limited. These findings should inform the current debate regarding age and criteria to discontinue cervical screening.

  • Hoffmann, Jean-Marc
    et al.
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 5, GMP Core Facil, Cellular Immunotherapy, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Schubert, Maria-Luisa
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 5, GMP Core Facil, Cellular Immunotherapy, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Wang, Lei
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 5, GMP Core Facil, Cellular Immunotherapy, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Hueckelhoven, Angela
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 5, GMP Core Facil, Cellular Immunotherapy, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Sellner, Leopold
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 5, GMP Core Facil, Cellular Immunotherapy, Heidelberg, Germany.;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Stock, Sophia
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 5, GMP Core Facil, Cellular Immunotherapy, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Schmitt, Anita
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 5, GMP Core Facil, Cellular Immunotherapy, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Kleist, Christian
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Nucl Med, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Gern, Ulrike
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 5, GMP Core Facil, Cellular Immunotherapy, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Loskog, Angelica S.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Klinisk immunologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wuchter, Patrick
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 5, GMP Core Facil, Cellular Immunotherapy, Heidelberg, Germany.;Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, German Red Cross Blood Serv Baden Wurttemberg Hes, Inst Transfus Med & Immunol, Mannheim, Germany..
    Hofmann, Susanne
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 5, GMP Core Facil, Cellular Immunotherapy, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Ho, Anthony D.
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 5, GMP Core Facil, Cellular Immunotherapy, Heidelberg, Germany.;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Mueller-Tidow, Carsten
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 5, GMP Core Facil, Cellular Immunotherapy, Heidelberg, Germany.;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Dreger, Peter
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 5, GMP Core Facil, Cellular Immunotherapy, Heidelberg, Germany.;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Schmitt, Michael
    Heidelberg Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med 5, GMP Core Facil, Cellular Immunotherapy, Heidelberg, Germany.;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Differences in Expansion Potential of Naive Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells from Healthy Donors and Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients2018Inngår i: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, artikkel-id 1956Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Therapy with chimeric antigen receptor T (CART) cells for hematological malignancies has shown promising results. Effectiveness of CART cells may depend on the ratio of naive (T-N) vs. effector (T-E) T cells, TN cells being responsible for an enduring antitumor activity through maturation. Therefore, we investigated factors influencing the T-N/T-E ratio of CART cells.

    Materials and methods: CART cells were generated upon transduction of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with a CD19.CAR-CD28-CD137zeta third generation retroviral vector under two different stimulating culture conditions: anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies adding either interleukin (IL)-7/1L-15 or IL-2. CART cells were maintained in culture for 20 days. We evaluated 24 healthy donors (HDs) and 11 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) for the composition of cell subsets and produced CART cells. Phenotype and functionality were tested using flow cytometry and chromium release assays.

    Results: IL -7/1L-15 preferentially induced differentiation into T-N, stem cell memory (T-SCM: naive CD27+ CD95+), CD4+ and CXCR3+ CART cells, while IL-2 increased effector memory (T-EM), CD56+ and CD4+ T regulatory (T-Reg) CART cells. The net amplification of different CART subpopulations derived from HDs and untreated CLL patients was compared. Particularly the expansion of CD4+ CART(N) cells differed significantly between the two groups. For HDs, this subtype expanded >60-fold, whereas CD4+ CART(N) cells of untreated CLL patients expanded less than 10-fold. Expression of exhaustion marker programmed cell death 1 on CART(N) cells on day 10 of culture was significantly higher in patient samples compared to HD samples. As the percentage of malignant B cells was expectedly higher within patient samples, an excessive amount of B cells during culture could account for the reduced expansion potential of CART(N) cells in untreated CLL patients. Final T-N/T-E ratio stayed <0.3 despite stimulation condition for patients, whereas this ratio was >2 in samples from HDs stimulated with IL-7/1L-15, thus demonstrating efficient CART(N) expansion.

    Conclusion: Untreated CLL patients might constitute a challenge for long-lasting CART effects in vivo since only a low number of T-N among the CART product could be generated. Depletion of malignant B cells before starting CART production might be considered to increase the T-N/T-E ratio within the CART product.

  • Wandell, Per
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Family Med & Primary Care, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Carlsson, Axel C
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiovaskulär epidemiologi. Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Li, Xinjun
    Lund Univ, Ctr Primary Hlth Care Res, Malmo, Sweden..
    Gasevic, Danijela
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Coll Med & Vet Med, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Arnlov, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Div Family Med & Primary Care, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Huddinge, Sweden.;Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    Holzmann, Martin J.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Funct Area Emergency Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Internal Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sundquist, Jan
    Lund Univ, Ctr Primary Hlth Care Res, Malmo, Sweden.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Family Med & Community Hlth, Dept Populat Hlth Sci & Policy, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Sundquist, Kristina
    Lund Univ, Ctr Primary Hlth Care Res, Malmo, Sweden.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Family Med & Community Hlth, Dept Populat Hlth Sci & Policy, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Atrial fibrillation in immigrant groups: a cohort study of all adults 45 years of age and older in Sweden2017Inngår i: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 32, nr 9, s. 785-796Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    To study the association between country of birth and incident atrial fibrillation (AF) in several immigrant groups in Sweden. The study population included all adults (n = 3,226,752) aged 45 years and older in Sweden. AF was defined as having at least one registered diagnosis of AF in the National Patient Register. The incidence of AF in different immigrant groups, using Swedish-born as referents, was assessed by Cox regression, expressed in hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). All models were stratified by sex and adjusted for age, geographical residence in Sweden, educational level, marital status, and neighbourhood socioeconomic status. Compared to their Swedish-born counterparts, higher incidence of AF [HR (95% CI)] was observed among men from Bosnia 1.74 (1.56-1.94) and Latvia 1.29 (1.09-1.54), and among women from Iraq 1.96 (1.67-2.31), Bosnia 1.88 (1.61-1.94), Finland 1.14 (1.11-1.17), Estonia 1.14 (1.05-1.24) and Germany 1.08 (1.03-1.14). Lower incidence of AF was noted among men (HRs > 0.60) from Iceland, Southern Europe (especially Greece, Italy and Spain), Latin America (especially Chile), Africa, Asia (including Iraq, Turkey, Lebanon and Iran), and among women from Nordic countries (except Finland), Southern Europe, Western Europe (except Germany), Africa, North America, Latin America, Iran, Lebanon and other Asian countries (except Turkey and Iraq). In conclusion, we observed substantial differences in incidence of AF between immigrant groups and the Swedish-born population. A greater awareness of the increased risk of AF development in some immigrant groups may enable for a timely diagnosis, treatment and prevention of its debilitating complications, such as stroke.

  • Arnold, Staci D.
    et al.
    Emory Univ Hosp, 1364 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA..
    Brazauskas, Ruta
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA.;Med Coll Wisconsin, Inst Hlth & Soc, Div Biostat, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    He, Naya
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Li, Yimei
    Univ Penn, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Aplenc, Richard
    Univ Penn, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Jin, Zhezhen
    Columbia Univ, Mailman Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, New York, NY USA..
    Hall, Matt
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, Div Pediat Hematol Oncol & Stem Cell Transplantat, New York, NY USA..
    Atsuta, Yoshiko
    Japanese Data Ctr Hematopoiet Cell Transplantat, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.;Nagoya Univ, Grad Sch Med, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Dalal, Jignesh
    Rainbow Babies & Childrens Hosp, 2101 Adelbert Rd, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Hahn, Theresa
    Roswell Pk Canc Inst, Dept Med, Buffalo, NY 14263 USA..
    Khera, Nandita
    Mayo Clin, Dept Hematol Oncol, Phoenix, AZ USA..
    Bonfim, Carmem
    Univ Fed Parana, Hosp Clin, Curitiba, Parana, Brazil..
    Majhail, Navneet S.
    Cleveland Clin, Taussig Canc Inst, Blood & Marrow Transplant Program, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Diaz, Miguel Angel
    Hosp Infantil Univ Nino Jesus, Dept Hematol Oncol, Madrid, Spain..
    Freytes, Cesar O.
    Texas Transplant Inst, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Wood, William A.
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Savani, Bipin N.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Nashville, TN USA..
    Kamble, Rammurti T.
    Baylor Coll Med, Ctr Cell & Gene Therapy, Div Hematol & Oncol, Houston, TX 77030 USA..
    Parsons, Susan
    Tufts Med Ctr, Boston, MA USA..
    Ahmed, Ibrahim
    Rainbow Babies & Childrens Hosp, 2101 Adelbert Rd, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Sullivan, Keith
    Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Durham, NC USA..
    Beattie, Sara
    Univ Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada..
    Dandoy, Christopher
    Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, Cincinnati, OH 45229 USA..
    Munker, Reinhold
    Louisiana State Univ Hlth Shreveport, Dept Internal Med, Sect Hematol Oncol, Shreveport, LA USA..
    Marino, Susana
    Univ Chicago Hosp, Chicago, IL 60637 USA..
    Bitan, Menachem
    Tel Aviv Sourasky Med Ctr, Dept Pediat Hematol Oncol, Tel Aviv, Israel..
    Abdel-Azim, Hisham
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Childrens Hosp Los Angeles, Div Hematol Oncol & Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA..
    Aljurf, Mahmoud
    King Faisal Specialist Hosp Ctr & Res, Dept Oncol, Riydah, Saudi Arabia..
    Olsson, Richard F.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Therapeut Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Joshi, Sarita
    Nationwide Childrens Hosp, Pediat Hematol Oncol & BMT, Columbus, OH USA.;Ohio State Univ Wexner, Columbus, OH USA..
    Buchbinder, Dave
    Childrens Hosp Orange Cty, Div Pediat Hematol, Orange, CA 92668 USA..
    Eckrich, Michael J.
    Levine Childrens Hosp, Charlotte, NC USA..
    Hashmi, Shahrukh
    Mayo Clin, Dept Internal Med, Minneapolis, MN USA..
    Lazarus, Hillard
    Univ Hosp Case Med Ctr, Seidman Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH USA..
    Marks, David I.
    Univ Hosp Bristol NHS Trust, Adult Bone Marrow Transplant, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Steinberg, Amir
    Mt Saini Hosp, Dept Hematol Oncol, New York, NY USA..
    Saad, Ayman
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Med, Div Hematol Oncol, Birmingham, AL USA..
    Gergis, Usama
    New York Presbyterian Hosp, Weill Cornell Med Coll, Dept Med Oncol, Hematol Malignancies & Bone Marrow Transplant, New York, NY USA..
    Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan
    Emory Univ Hosp, 1364 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA..
    Abraham, Allistair
    Childrens Natl Med Ctr, Ctr Canc & Blood Disorders, Div Blood & Marrow Transplantat, Washington, DC 20010 USA..
    Rangarajan, Hemalatha G.
    Nationwide Childrens Hosp, Pediat Hematol Oncol & BMT, Columbus, OH USA.;Ohio State Univ Wexner, Columbus, OH USA..
    Walters, Mark
    Childrens Hosp & Res Ctr Oakland, Oakland, NY USA..
    Lipscomb, Joseph
    Emory Univ, Winship Canc Inst, Rollins Sch Publ Hlth, Hlth Policy & Management, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA..
    Saber, Wael
    Med Coll Wisconsin, Dept Med, CIBMTR, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA..
    Satwani, Prakash
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, Div Pediat Hematol Oncol & Stem Cell Transplantat, New York, NY USA..
    Clinical risks and healthcare utilization of hematopoietic cell transplantation for sickle cell disease in the USA using merged databases2017Inngår i: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 102, nr 11, s. 1823-1832Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for sickle cell disease have improved outcomes, but there is limited analysis of healthcare utilization in this setting. We hypothesized that, compared to late transplantation, early transplantation (at age < 10 years) improves outcomes and decreases healthcare utilization. We performed a retrospective study of children transplanted for sickle cell disease in the USA during 2000-2013 using two large databases. Univariate and Cox models were used to estimate associations of demographics, sickle cell disease severity, and transplant-related variables with mortality and chronic graft-versus-host disease, while Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis, or linear trend tests were applied for the estimates of healthcare utilization. Among 161 patients with a 2-year overall survival rate of 90% (95% confidence interval [CI] 85-95%) mortality was significantly higher in those who underwent late transplantation versus early (hazard ratio (HR) 21, 95% CI 2.8-160.8, P=0.003) and unrelated compared to matched sibling donor transplantation (HR 5.9, 95% CI 1.7-20.2, P=0.005). Chronic graftversus host disease was significantly more frequent among those translanted late (HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.5, P=0.034) and those who received an unrelated graft (HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.2-5.4; P=0.017). Merged data for 176 patients showed that the median total adjusted transplant cost per patient was $467,747 (range: $344,029-$ 799,219). Healthcare utilization was lower among recipients of matched sibling donor grafts and those with low severity disease compared to those with other types of donor and disease severity types (P<0.001 and P=0.022, respectively); no association was demonstrated with late transplantation (P=0.775). Among patients with 2-year pre-and post-transplant data (n=41), early transplantation was associated with significant reductions in admissions (P<0.001), length of stay (P<0.001), and cost (P=0.008). Early transplant outcomes need to be studied prospectively in young children without severe disease and an available matched sibling to provide conclusive evidence for the superiority of this approach. Reduced post-transplant healthcare utilization inpatient care indicates that transplantation may provide a sustained decrease in healthcare costs over time.

  • Disputas: 2018-03-13 13:15 Ada Lovelace, B-huset, Linköping
    Krishnamoorthi, Vengatanathan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Efficient HTTP-based Adaptive Streaming of Linear and Interactive Videos2018Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Online video streaming has gained tremendous popularity over recent years and currently constitutes the majority of Internet traffic. As large-scale on-demand streaming continues to gain popularity, several important questions and challenges remain unanswered. This thesis addresses open questions in the areas of efficient content delivery for HTTP-based Adaptive Streaming (HAS) from different perspectives (client, network and content provider) and in the design, implementation, and evaluation of interactive streaming applications over HAS.

    As streaming usage scales and new streaming services emerge, continuous improvements are required to both the infrastructure and the techniques used to deliver high-quality streams. In the context of Content Delivery Network (CDN) nodes or proxies, this thesis investigates the interaction between HAS clients and proxy caches. In particular, we propose and evaluate classes of content-aware and collaborative policies that take advantage of information that is already available, or share information among elements in the delivery chain, where all involved parties can benefit. Asides from the users’ playback experience, it is also important for content providers to minimize users’ startup times. We have designed and evaluated different classes of client-side policies that can prefetch data from the videos that the users are most likely to watch next, without negatively affecting the currently watched video. To help network providers to monitor and ensure that their customers enjoy good playback experiences, we have proposed and evaluated techniques that can be used to estimate clients’ current buffer conditions. Since several services today stream over HTTPS, our solution is adapted to predict client buffer conditions by only observing encrypted network-level traffic. Our solution allows the operator to identify clients with low-buffer conditions and implement policies that help avoid playback stalls.

    The emergence of HAS as the de facto standard for delivering streaming content also opens the door to use it to deliver the next generation of streaming services, such as various forms of interactive services. This class of services is gaining popularity and is expected to be the next big thing in entertainment. For the area of interactive streaming, this thesis proposes, models, designs, and evaluates novel streaming applications such as interactive branched videos and multi-video stream bundles. For these applications, we design and evaluate careful prefetching policies that provides seamless playback (without stalls or switching delay) even when interactive branched video viewers defer their choices to the last possible moment and when users switches between alternative streams within multi-video stream bundles. Using optimization frameworks, we design and implement effective buffer management techniques for seamless playback experiences and evaluate several tradeoffs using our policies.  

  • Lisspers, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Larsson, Kjell
    Karolinska Inst, Natl Inst Environm Med, Dept Work Environm Toxicol, Solna, Sweden..
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lung- allergi- och sömnforskning.
    Costa-Scharplatz, Madlaina
    Novartis AB, Taby, Sweden..
    Gruenberger, Jean-Bernard
    Novartis, Basel, Switzerland..
    Uhde, Milica
    IQVIA, Solna, Sweden..
    Jorgensen, Leif
    IQVIA, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Gutzwiller, Florian S.
    Novartis, Basel, Switzerland..
    Ställberg, Björn
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Allmänmedicin och preventivmedicin.
    Economic burden of COPD in a Swedish cohort: the ARCTIC study2018Inngår i: The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1176-9106, E-ISSN 1178-2005, Vol. 13, s. 275-285Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We assessed direct and indirect costs associated with COPD in Sweden and examined how these costs vary across time, age, and disease stage in a cohort of patients with COPD and matched controls in a real-world, primary care (PC) setting.

    Patients and methods: Data from electronic medical records linked to the mandatory national health registers were collected for COPD patients and a matched reference population in 52 PC centers from 2000 to 2014. Direct health care costs (drug, outpatient or inpatient, PC, both COPD related and not COPD related) and indirect health care costs (loss of income, absenteeism, loss of productivity) were assessed.

    Results: A total of 17,479 patients with COPD and 84,514 reference controls were analyzed. During 2013, direct costs were considerably higher among the COPD patient population ((sic)13,179) versus the reference population ((sic)2,716), largely due to hospital nights unrelated to COPD. Direct costs increased with increasing disease severity and increasing age and were driven by higher respiratory drug costs and non-COPD-related hospital nights. Indirect costs (similar to(sic)28,000 per patient) were the largest economic burden in COPD patients of working age during 2013.

    Conclusion: As non-COPD-related hospital nights represent the largest direct cost, management of comorbidities in COPD would offer clinical benefits and relieve the financial burden of disease.

  • Leung, Ting Fan
    et al.
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Paediat, Shatin, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Anthony Pak-Yin
    Univ Hong Kong, Li Ka Shing Fac Med, Dept Paediat & Adolescent Med, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Lim, Fong Seng
    Natl Healthcare Grp Polyclin, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Singapore, Singapore, Singapore..
    Thollot, Franck
    AFPA, Esseys Les Nancy, France..
    Oh, Helen May Lin
    Changi Gen Hosp, Div Infect Dis, Singapore, Singapore..
    Lee, Bee Wah
    Natl Univ Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.;Mt Elizabeth Med Ctr, Singapore, Singapore..
    Rombo, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tan, Ngiap Chuan
    SingHlth Polyclin, Singapore, Singapore.;DUKE NUS Grad Med Sch, Singapore, Singapore..
    Rouzier, Roman
    Inst Curie, Paris, France..
    De Simoni, Stephanie
    GSK, Rixensart, Belgium..
    Suryakiran, Pemmaraju
    GSK, Bangalore, Karnataka, India..
    Hezareh, Marjan
    Chiltern Int GSK, Wavre, Belgium..
    Thomas, Florence
    GSK, Wavre, Belgium..
    Folschweiller, Nicolas
    GSK, Wavre, Belgium..
    Struyf, Frank
    GSK, Wavre, Belgium..
    Comparative immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and 4vHPV vaccine administered according to two- or three-dose schedules in girls aged 9-14 years: Results to month 36 from a randomized trial2018Inngår i: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 36, nr 1, s. 98-106Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This observer-blind study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01462357) compared the immunogenicity and safety of two doses (2D) of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (2D of AS04-HPV-16/18) vs. two or three doses of the 4vHPV vaccine [2D or 3D of 4vHPV] in 1075 healthy girls aged 9-14 years. Girls were randomized (1:1:1) to receive 2D of AS04-HPV-16/18 at months (M) 0, 6 (N = 359), 2D of 4vHPV at MO, 6 (N = 358) or 3D of 4vHPV at MO, 2, 6 (N = 358). 351, 339 and 346 girls, respectively, returned for the concluding visit at M36. Superiority was demonstrated at M7 and M12; comparison of the immune response to both vaccine antigens was made between 2D of AS04-HPV-16/18 and 2D or 3D of 4vHPV at subsequent time points in the according-to-protocol immunogenicity cohort (ATP-I; N = 958 at M36) and the total vaccinated cohort (TVC: N = 1036 at M36). HPV-16/18-specific T-cell- and B-cell-mediated immune responses and safety were also investigated. At M36, anti-HPV-16/18 ELISA responses in the 2D AS04-HPV-16/18 group remained superior to those of the 2D and 3D 4vHPV groups. In the M36 TVC, geometric mean titers were 2.78-fold (HPV-16) and 6.84-fold (HPV-18) higher for 2D of AS04-HPV-16/18 vs. 2D of 4vHPV and 2.3-fold (HPV-16) and 4.14-fold (HPV-18) higher vs. 3D of 4vHPV. Results were confirmed by vaccine pseudovirion-based neutralisation assay. Numbers of circulating CD4(+) T cells and B cells appeared similar across groups. Safety was in line with the known safety profiles of both vaccines. In conclusion, superior HPV-16/18 antibody responses were elicited by 2D of the AS04-HPV-16/18 compared with 2D or 3D of the 4vHPV vaccine in girls aged 9-14 years.

  • Saeed, Sumbul
    et al.
    Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, University of Sindh-76080, Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Rafiq, Muhammad
    Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, University of Sindh-76080, Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Baloach, Qurrat-ul-Ain
    Dr. M. A. Kazi Institute of Chemistry University of Sindh-76080, Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Naqvi, Syed Habib Ahmed
    Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, University of Sindh-76080, Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Materialvetenskap.
    Willander, Magnus
    Department of Science and Technology, Campus Norrkoping, Linkoping University.
    Akhtar, Mansoor
    Key Lab of Polyoxometalate of Science, Northeast Normal University, Changchun City, Jilin Province, P. R. China.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Materialvetenskap. Dr. M. A. Kazi Institute of Chemistry University of Sindh-76080, Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Realization of Peptone Biosensor Based on Newly Prepared NiO Nanostructures2017Inngår i: Sensor Letters, ISSN 1546-198X, E-ISSN 1546-1971, Vol. 15, nr 10, s. 822-826Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study authenticates the fabrication of nickel oxide porous shaped nanostructure by hydrothermal method. The novel and functionalized nickel oxide nanomaterial were visualized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction techniques (XRD). NiO nanomaterial advertised sensitive, selective and attracted morphology for the development of peptone biosensor. Phenylalanine displays a soft template and growth directing agent for the developing of nickel oxide low dimension nanostructures. The nickel oxide nanomaterial together with protease possesses tremendous role towards the oxidation potential phenomena and transfer of anodic electro-catalytic current for the peptone. The generation of low potential electrochemical signals exhibited the determination of peptone by utilizing different electrochemical techniques for the given concentration ranging from 0.1 mM to 2.5 mM with the measured limit of detection about 0.002 mM with a sensitivity of 107200 μA/mMCm2. The well-defined and highly developed sensor system provides the standard platform for the fabrication and functioning of new devices that are helpful for the determination of many biological macromolecules. The presented peptone biosensor is highly selective, sensitive, and reproducible that could also be useful for the determination of peptone from various milk samples.

  • Kumar, Raj
    et al.
    National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080, Pakistan.
    Sirajuddin,
    National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080, Pakistan.
    Solangi, Amber Rehana
    National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080, Pakistan.
    Amin, Sidra
    National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080, Pakistan.
    Mahar, Ali Muhammad
    National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080, Pakistan.
    Abro, Muhammad Ishaque
    Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Mehran University of Engineering and Technology, Jamshoro, Pakistan.
    Shaikh, Tayyaba
    National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080, Pakistan.
    Shah, Syed Muhammad Usman Ali
    Department of Electronics, NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, Pakistan.
    Tahira, Aneela
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Materialvetenskap.
    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för teknikvetenskap och matematik, Materialvetenskap. Dr. M. A. Kazi Institute of Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080, Pakistan.
    Synthesis of Sheet Like Morphology of NiO for Sensitive and Selective Determination of Urea2017Inngår i: Sensor Letters, ISSN 1546-198X, E-ISSN 1546-1971, Vol. 15, nr 10, s. 803-810Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient and simple method has been demonstrated for the synthesis of nickel oxide nanostructures using urea as a capping agent. The nanosheet-like morphology was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, crystalline nature was studied by using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and surface area of nanomaterial was investigated by automated sorption analyzer. Then synthesized NiO nanostructures were used to fabricate the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrocatalytic parameters of modified NiO/GCE electrode were investigated by using various techniques such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), square wave voltammetry (SWV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), normal pulse voltammetry (NPV) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry. Various working experimental conditions were optimized in order to attain the highest sensitivity for the determination of urea and the highest peak current 1032 μA of response were obtained at 100 μM concentration of urea. A linear calibration plot was obtained for peak current versus concentration of urea in the range of 10 μM urea to 80 μM urea with a good detection limit of 2 μM. The proposed working strategy was successfully employed for the estimation of urea in human urine samples and the obtained results are found satisfactory. The newly functional urea sensor can be exploited at large scale as an alternative analytical device beside to the other reported urea sensors

  • Chioar, Ioan-Augustin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Materialfysik.
    Rowan-Robinson, Richard
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Materialfysik.
    Melander, Emil
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Materialfysik.
    Dannegger, Tobias
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Materialfysik.
    George, Sebastian
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Materialfysik.
    Hjörvarsson, Björgvin
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Materialfysik.
    Papaioannou, Evangelos Th.
    Fachbereich Physik and Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS Technische Universita ̈t, Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany.
    Kapaklis, Vassilios
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Materialfysik.
    Modular magneto-optical diffractometer for the characterization of magnetoplasmonic crystalsManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the development of a modular magneto-optical diffractometer designed to measure the optical and magneto-optical properties of nanostructured magnetoplasmonic crystals. The system uses monochromatic, coherent light beams with defined polarization states, for the energy- and angular-dependent measurement of reflected and transmitted beams. Polarization analysis instrumentation further enables the detailed characterisation of the polarization state of the light after the interaction with the magnetoplasmonic crystals. The magneto-optical activity is measured with the help of a quadrupole coil system, allowing for the application of magnetic fields in the plane of the samples. The instrument’s versatile design provides a toolbox of methods capable of capturing a far-field description of the optical and magneto-optical response of magnetoplasmonic crystals. We demonstrate its functionality and utility for the case of a Ni-antidot crystal. 

  • Tersman, Folke
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Filosofiska institutionen.
    Review of Derek Parfit’s On What Matters, volume 3 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, ISBN: 9780198778608).2018Inngår i: European Journal of Philosophy, ISSN 0966-8373, E-ISSN 1468-0378Artikkel, omtale (Fagfellevurdert)
  • Poelzer, Gregory A.
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Samhällsvetenskap.
    Ejdemo, Thomas
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, teknik och samhälle, Samhällsvetenskap.
    Too Good to be True?: The Expectations and Reality of Mine Development in Pajala, Sweden2018Inngår i: Arctic Review on Law and Politics, ISSN 1891-6252, E-ISSN 2387-4562, Vol. 9, s. 3-24Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to achieve legitimacy, reality must match expectations. Resource development projects, such as mining, often force small communities to make difficult decisions regarding which projects to support or reject based on whether their expectations regarding the development of a mine manifest in reality. To make this assessment, this study looks at the factors that contributed to the legitimacy of a mine in northern Sweden, focusing on the community of Pajala, where a new mine opened in 2012. We conducted interviews with local residents representing different interests that aimed to draw out what legitimized or delegitimized the mine. From these interviews, we determined that economic factors weighed most heavily in generating support for the mine. Subsequently, in order to determine if these economic expectations matched reality, we examined economic performance data on the municipality. We found that many of the factors identified in the interviews related to local outcomes and that these matched closely with economic changes associated with the mine. Given the largely positive perceptions of the mine, the congruence between economic expectations and reality validate this support from the community. Thus, our results provide insight into the factors that affect legitimacy at the local level.

  • Wicha, Sebastian G.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Farmaceutiska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmaceutisk biovetenskap.
    Chen, Chunli
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Farmaceutiska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmaceutisk biovetenskap.
    Clewe, Oskar
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Farmaceutiska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmaceutisk biovetenskap.
    Svensson, Ulrika S.H.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Farmaceutiska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmaceutisk biovetenskap.
    A general pharmacodynamic interaction model identifies perpetrators and victims in drug interactions2017Inngår i: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, artikkel-id 2129Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment of pharmacodynamic (PD) drug interactions is a cornerstone of the development of combination drug therapies. To guide this venture, we derive a general pharmacodynamic interaction (GPDI) model for ≥2 interacting drugs that is compatible with common additivity criteria. We propose a PD interaction to be quantifiable as multidirectional shifts in drug efficacy or potency and explicate the drugs’ role as victim, perpetrator or even both at the same time. We evaluate the GPDI model against conventional approaches in a data set of 200 combination experiments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: 22% interact additively, a minority of the interactions (11%) are bidirectional antagonistic or synergistic, whereas the majority (67%) are monodirectional, i.e., asymmetric with distinct perpetrators and victims, which is not classifiable by conventional methods. The GPDI model excellently reflects the observed interaction data, and hence represents an attractive approach for quantitative assessment of novel combination therapies along the drug development process.

  • Park, Sungkyu
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Farmaceutiska fakulteten, Institutionen för läkemedelskemi, Avdelningen för farmakognosi.
    Yoo, Ki-Oug
    Kangwon National University, Department of Biological Sciencesi.
    Marcussen, Thomas
    University of Oslo, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biosciences.
    Backlund, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Farmaceutiska fakulteten, Institutionen för läkemedelskemi, Avdelningen för farmakognosi.
    Jacobsson, Erik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Farmaceutiska fakulteten, Institutionen för läkemedelskemi, Avdelningen för farmakognosi.
    Rosengren, K. Johan
    The University of Queensland, School of Biomedical Sciences.
    Doo, Inseok
    Dong-A Pharm Co Ltd, Biotech Research Center, Biotech Research Team.
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Farmaceutiska fakulteten, Institutionen för läkemedelskemi, Avdelningen för farmakognosi.
    Cyclotide Evolution: Insights from the Analyses of Their Precursor Sequences, Structures and Distribution in Violets (Viola)2017Inngår i: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 8, artikkel-id 2058Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclotides are a family of plant proteins that are characterized by a cyclic backbone and a knotted disulfide topology. Their cyclic cystine knot (CCK) motif makes them exceptionally resistant to thermal, chemical, and enzymatic degradation. By disrupting cell membranes, the cyclotides function as host defense peptides by exhibiting insecticidal, anthelmintic, antifouling, and molluscicidal activities. In this work, we provide the first insight into the evolution of this family of plant proteins by studying the Violaceae, in particular species of the genus Viola. We discovered 157 novel precursor sequences by the transcriptomic analysis of six Viola species: V. albida var. takahashii, V. mandshurica, V. orientalis, V. verecunda, V. acuminata, and V. canadensis. By combining these precursor sequences with the phylogenetic classification of Viola, we infer the distribution of cyclotides across 63% of the species in the genus (i.e., ~380 species). Using full precursor sequences from transcriptomes, we show an evolutionary link to the structural diversity of the cyclotides, and further classify the cyclotides by sequence signatures from the non-cyclotide domain. Also, transcriptomes were compared to cyclotide expression on a peptide level determined using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, the novel cyclotides discovered were associated with the emergence of new biological functions.

  • Ericson, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Forskargrupper (Inst. för kvinnor och barns hälsa), Perinatal, neonatal och barnkardiologisk forskning. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning Dalarna. Falu Hospital, Department of Paediatrics.
    Flacking, Renee
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies.
    Udo, Camilla
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning Dalarna. Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies.
    Mothers' experiences of a telephone based breastfeeding support intervention after discharge from neonatal intensive care units: a mixed-method study2017Inngår i: International Breastfeeding Journal, ISSN 1746-4358, E-ISSN 1746-4358, Vol. 12, artikkel-id 50Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: After discharge from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), many mothers of preterm infants (gestational age < 37 weeks) experience a lack of support for breastfeeding. An intervention study was designed to evaluate the effects of proactive (a daily telephone call initiated by a member of a breastfeeding support team) and/or reactive (mothers could call the breastfeeding support team) telephone based breastfeeding support for mothers after discharge from the NICU. The mothers in the intervention group had access to both proactive and reactive support; the mothers in the control group only had access to reactive support. The aim of this study was to explore the mothers’ experiences of the proactive and reactive telephone support.

    Methods: This study was a qualitatively driven, mixed-method evaluation using three data sources: questionnaires with qualitative open-ended questions, visual analogue scales and telephone interviews. In total, 365 mothers contributed data for this study. The qualitative data were analysed with an inductive thematic network analysis, while the quantitative data were analysed with Student’s t-test and the chi-square test.

    Results: Proactive support contributed to greater satisfaction and involvement in breastfeeding support. The mothers who received proactive support reported that they felt strengthened, supported and secure, as a result of the continuous care provided by staff who were knowledgeable and experienced (i.e., in breastfeeding and preterm infants), which resulted in the global theme ‘Empowered by proactive support’. The mothers who received reactive support experienced contradictory feelings; some felt secure because they had the opportunity to call for support, whereas others found it difficult to decide when and if they should use the service, which resulted in the global theme; ‘Duality of reactive support’.

    Conclusion: There were positive aspects of both proactive (i.e., greater satisfaction and feelings of empowerment) and reactive support (i.e., the opportunity to call for support); however, the provision of reactive support alone may be inadequate for those with the greatest need for support as they are the least likely to access it.

  • Lodin, Karin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Care Sciences and Society, Department of Neurobiology; Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    Lekander, Mats
    Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical Neuroscience; Stockholm University, Stress Research Institute.
    Syk, Jörgen
    Karolinska Institute, Care Sciences and Society, Department of Neurobiology; Karolinska Institute, Centre for Allergy Research; Academic Primary Health Care Centre, Stockholm.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Forskargrupper (Inst. för kvinnor och barns hälsa), Pediatrisk inflammationsforskning.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Care Sciences and Society, Department of Neurobiology; Stockholm University, Stress Research Institute; Macquarie University, Department of Psychology.
    Associations between self-rated health, sickness behaviour and inflammatory markers in primary care patients with allergic asthma: a longitudinal study2017Inngår i: NPD Bulletin, ISSN 1892-8110, E-ISSN 2055-1010, Vol. 27, artikkel-id 67Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder associated with elevated levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE), serum eosinophilic cationic protein (S-ECP), plasma eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (P-EDN) and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO). Poor self-rated health and sickness behaviour has repeatedly been associated with inflammatory markers, but the nature of this relationship in chronic inflammatory disease is not known. Likewise, such findings largely rely on cross-sectional investigations. Self-rated health (How would you rate your general state of health?), sickness behaviour (mean rating of satisfaction with energy, sleep, fitness, appetite and memory), IgE, S-ECP, P-EDN, and FENO were assessed in 181 non-smoking primary care patients with asthma in a 1-year longitudinal study. Associations between repeated measurements were calculated using mixed regression models and Spearman’s correlations for change scores. Poor self-rated health was associated with high levels of seasonal IgE (p = 0.05) and food IgE (p = 0.04), but not total IgE or inflammatory markers. An increase over 1 year in perennial IgE was associated with a worsening of self-rated health (ρ = 0.16, p = 0.04). Poor self-rated health was associated with more pronounced sickness behaviour (p < 0.001), and a worsening in sickness behaviour was associated with a worsening of self-rated health over time (ρ = 0.21, p = 0.007). The study corroborates the importance of sickness behaviour as a determinant of self-rated health by showing that these factors co-vary over a 1-year period in a group of patients with allergic asthma. The importance of specific IgE for perceived health in primary care patients with mild to moderate asthma needs further investigation.

  • Disputas: 2018-02-23 10:15 ACAS, A-huset, Linköping
    Zhang, Pimin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Konstruktionsmaterial. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Oxidation behaviour of MCrAlX coatings: effect of surface treatment and an Al-activity based life criterion2018Licentiatavhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    MCrAlY coatings (M=Ni and/or Co) have been widely used for the protection of superalloy components against oxidation and hot corrosion in the hot sections of gas turbines. The drive to improve engine combustion efficiency while reducing emissions by increasing the operation temperature brings a big challenge for coating design. As a result, the need for improvement of MCrAlY coatings for better oxidation resistance is essential.

    Formation of a stable, dense, continuous, and slow-growing α-Al2O3 layer, on the MCrAlY coating surface, is the key to oxidation protection, since the protective α-Al2O3 scale offers superior oxidation resistance due to its lower oxygen-diffusion rate as compared with other oxides. The ability of a MCrAlY coating to form and maintain such a protective scale depends on the coating composition and microstructure, and can be improved through optimization of deposition parameters, modification of coating surface conditions, and so on. Part of this thesis work focuses on studying the effect of post-deposition surface treatments on the oxidation behavior of MCrAlX coatings (X can be yttrium and/or other minor alloying elements). The aim is to gain fundamental understanding of alumina scale evolution during oxidation which is important for achieving improved oxidation resistance of MCrAlX coatings. Oxide scale formed on coatings at initial oxidation stage and the effect of surface treatment were investigated by a multi-approach study combining photo-stimulated luminescence, microstructural observation and weight gain. Results showed that both mechanically polished and shot-peened coatings exhibited superior performance due to rapid formation of α-Al2O3 fully covering the coating and suppressing growth of transient alumina, assisted by the high density of α-Al2O3 nuclei on surface treatment induced defects. The early development of a two-layer alumina scale, consisting of an inward-grown inner α-Al2O3 layer and an outer layer transformed from outward-grown transient alumina, resulted in a higher oxide growth rate of the as-sprayed coating. The positive effect of the surface treatments on retarding oxide scale growth and suppressing formation of spinel was also observed in oxidation test up to 1000 hrs.

    As the oxidation proceeds to the close-to-end stage, a reliable criterion to estimate the capability of coating to form α-Al2O3 is of great importance to accurately evaluate coating lifetime, which is the aim of the other part of the thesis work. Survey of published results on a number of binary Ni-Al and ternary Ni-Cr-Al, Ni-Al-Si systems shows that the empirical Al-concentration based criterion is inadequate to properly predict the formation of a continuous α-Al2O3 scale. On the other hand, correlating the corresponding Al-activity data, calculated from measured chemical compositions using the Thermo-Calc software, to the experimental oxidation results has revealed a temperature dependent, critical Al-activity value for forming continuous α-Al2O3 scale. To validate the criterion, long-term oxidation tests were performed on five MCrAlX coatings with varying compositions and the implementation of the Al-activity based criterion on these coatings successfully predicted α-Al2O3 formation, showing a good agreement with experiment results.

  • Olsson, K. Sigvard
    et al.
    University of Göteborg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology and Coagulation.
    Wålinder, Olof
    Östersund Hospital, Department of Medicine.
    Jansson, Ulf
    Sundsvall Hospital, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Wilbe, Maria
    Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Bondeson, Marie-Louise
    Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Stattin, Evalena
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Raha-Chowdhury, Ruma
    University of Cambridge, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, John van Geest Centre for Brain Repair.
    Williams, Roger
    Foundation for Liver Research, Institute of Hepatology London; King ́s College London, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine.
    Common founder effects of hereditary hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease, the long QT syndrome and autosomal recessive deafness caused by two novel mutations in the WHRN and TMC1 genes2017Inngår i: Hereditas, ISSN 0018-0661, E-ISSN 1601-5223, Vol. 154, artikkel-id 16Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Genealogy and molecular genetic studies of a Swedish river valley population resulted in a large pedigree, showing that the hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) HFE/p.C282Y mutation is inherited with other recessive disorders such as Wilson´s disease (WND), a rare recessive disorder of copper overload. The population also contain individuals with the Swedish long QT syndrome (LQTS1) founder mutation (KCNQ1/p.Y111C) which in homozygotes causes the Jervell & Lange Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) and hearing loss (HL).

    Aims of the study were to test whether the Swedish long QT founder mutation originated in an ancestral HFE family and if carriers had an increased risk for hemochromatosis (HH), a treatable disorder. We also aimed to identify the pathogenic mutation causing the hearing loss disorder segregating in the pedigree.

    Methods: LQTS patients were asked about their ancestry and possible origin in a HH family. They were also offered a predictive testing for the HFE genotype. Church books were screened for families with hearing loss. One HH family had two members with hearing loss, who underwent molecular genetic analysis of the LQTS founder mutation, connexin 26 and thereafter exome sequencing. Another family with hearing loss in repeat generations was also analyzed for connexin 26 and underwent exome sequencing.

    Results: Of nine LQTS patients studied, four carried a HFE mutation (two p.C282Y, two p.H63D), none was homozygous. Three LQTS patients confirmed origin in a female founder ( b 1694, identical to AJ b 1694, a HFE pedigree member from the Fax river. Her descent of 44 HH families, included also 29 families with hearing loss (HL) suggesting JLNS. Eleven LQTS probands confirmed origin in a second founder couple (b 1614/1605) in which the woman b 1605 was identical to a HFE pedigree member from the Fjällsjö river. In her descent there were not only 64 HH, six WND families, one JLNS, but also 48 hearing loss families. Most hearing loss was non syndromic and caused by founder effects of the late 16th century. One was of Swedish origin carrying the WHRN, c.1977delC, (p.S660Afs*30) mutation, the other was a TMC1(NM_138691),c.1814T>C,(p.L605P) mutation, possibly of Finnish origin.

    Conclusions: Deep human HFE genealogies show HFE to be associated with other genetic disorders like Wilson´s disease, LQTS, JLNS, and autosomal recessive hearing loss. Two new homozygous HL mutations in WHRN/p.S660Afs*30 and TMC1/p.L605P were identified,none of them previously reported from Scandinavia. The rarity of JLNS was possibly caused by miscarriage or intrauterine death. Most hearing loss (81.7%) was seen after 1844 when first cousin marriages were permitted. However, only 10 (10.3%) came from 1st cousin unions and only 2 (2.0 %) was born out of wedlock.

  • Palmqvist, N. G. Martin
    et al.
    Swedish University Agricultural Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology.
    Seisenbaeva, Gulaim A.
    Swedish University Agricultural Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology.
    Svedlindh, Peter
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Fasta tillståndets fysik.
    Kessler, Vadim G.
    Swedish University Agricultural Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology.
    Maghemite Nanoparticles Acts as Nanozymes, Improving Growth and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Brassica napus2017Inngår i: Nanoscale Research Letters, ISSN 1931-7573, E-ISSN 1556-276X, Vol. 12, artikkel-id 631Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Yttrium doping-stabilized γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were studied for its potential to serve as a plant fertilizer and, through enzymatic activity, support drought stress management. Levels of both hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation, after drought, were reduced when γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were delivered by irrigation in a nutrient solution to Brassica napus plants grown in soil. Hydrogen peroxide was reduced from 151 to 83 μM g−1 compared to control, and the malondialdehyde formation was reduced from 36 to 26 mM g−1. Growth rate of leaves was enhanced from 33 to 50% growth compared to fully fertilized plants and SPAD-measurements of chlorophyll increased from 47 to 52 suggesting improved agronomic properties by use of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles as fertilizer as compared to chelated iron.

  • Disputas: 2018-02-28 10:15 Planck, Fysikhuset, Linköping
    Wang, Fei
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Teoretisk Fysik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Properties of multilayered and multicomponent nitride alloys from first principles2018Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a theoretical exploration of properties of multilayered and multicomponent nitride alloys, in particular their mixing thermodynamics and elastic behaviors. Systematic investigation of properties of a large class of materials, such as the multicomponent nitride solid solutions, is in line with the modern approach of high-throughput search of novel materials. In this thesis we benchmark and utilize simple but efficient methodological frameworks in predicting mixing thermodynamics, Young’s moduli distribution of multilayer alloys and the linear thermal expansion of quaternary nitride solid solutions.

    We demonstrate by accurate ab-initio calculations that Ti1−xAlxN solid solution is stabilized by interfacial effects if it is coherently sandwiched between TiN layers along (001). For TiN/AlN and ZrN/AlN multilayers we show higher thermodynamic stability with semicoherent interfaces than with isostructural coherent ones.

    Accurate 0 Kelvin elastic constants of cubic TixXyAl1xyN (X=Zr, Hf, Nb, V, Ta) solid solutions and their multilayers are derived and an analytic comparison of strengths and ductility are presented to reveal the potential of these materials in hard coating applications. The Young’s moduli variation of the bulk materials has provided a reliable descriptor to screen the Young’s moduli of coherent multilayers.

    The Debye model is used to reveal the high-temperature thermodynamics and spinodal decomposition of TixNbyAl1−x−yN. We show that though the effect of vibration is large on the mixing Gibbs free energy the local spinoal decomposition tendencies are not altered. A quasi-harmonic Debye model is benchmarked against results of molecular dynamics simulations in predicting the thermal expansion coefficients of TixXyAl1xyN (X=Zr, Hf, Nb, V, Ta).  

  • Holmström, Simon
    et al.
    Katedralskolan .
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Lunds universitet.
    Reistad, Nina
    Lunds universitet.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Forskningsmiljön Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA). Högskolan Kristianstad, Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Avdelningen för matematik- och naturvetenskapernas didaktik. Lunds universitet.
    Gymnasiets laboratorionsundervisning i fysik: mellan tradition och ändrade styrdokument2018Inngår i: LUMAT: Luonnontieteiden, matematiikan ja teknologian opetuksen tutkimus ja käytäntö, ISSN 2323-7104, E-ISSN 2323-7112, Vol. 6, nr 1, s. 1-19Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    Laborationer har lång tradition i fysikundervisningen och det finns många klassiska skolexperiment. Samtidigt påverkas laborationsundervisningen av reformer och teknikutveckling. I denna studie fick lärare på tre gymnasieskolor diskutera sin laborationsundervisning. Analysen baseras på händelselogik, där handling ses som intentionell och styrs av determinanterna: målsättning, förmåga, plikt och möjligheter. Studien ger insikt i hur olika faktorer påverkar lärares laborationsundervisning, och hur klassiska laborationer i fysikundervisningen både kan ha en given plats och utmanas av nya förutsättningar. Resultaten antyder att praxis och tradition är starkare påverkansfaktorer än styrdokument i lärares utformning av laborationsundervisningen, vilket delvis kan relateras till en avsaknad av fortbildning.

  • Flannick, Jason
    et al.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Mol Biol, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Fuchsberger, Christian
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Mahajan, Anubha
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Teslovich, Tanya M.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Agarwala, Vineeta
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA.;MIT, Harvard Div Hlth Sci & Technol, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Gaulton, Kyle J.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Caulkins, Lizz
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Koesterer, Ryan
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Ma, Clement
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Moutsianas, Loukas
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    McCarthy, Davis J.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Dept Stat, Oxford, England..
    Rivas, Manuel A.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Perry, John R. B.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Exeter, Univ Exeter Med Sch, Genet Complex Traits, Exeter, Devon, England.;Univ Cambridge, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge, England.;Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, London, England..
    Sim, Xueling
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Blackwell, Thomas W.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Robertson, Neil R.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England..
    Rayner, N. William
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England.;Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Dept Human Genet, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, England..
    Cingolani, Pablo
    McGill Univ, Sch Comp Sci, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;McGill Univ, Genome Quebec Innovat Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3A 2T5, Canada..
    Locke, Adam E.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Tajes, Juan Fernandez
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Highland, Heather M.
    Univ Texas Grad Sch Biomed Sci, Ctr Human Genet, Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, Houston, TX USA..
    Dupuis, Josee
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Mol Biol, Boston, MA USA.;Boston Univ Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostatist, Boston, MA USA.;Nat Heart Lung & Blood Inst Framingham Heart Stud, Framingham, MA USA..
    Chines, Peter S.
    NIH, Natl Human Genome Res Inst, Med Genom & Metab Genet Branch, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Lindgren, Cecilia M.
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA.;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Hartl, Christopher
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Jackson, Anne U.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Chen, Han
    Boston Univ Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostatist, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostatist, Boston, MA USA..
    Huyghe, Jeroen R.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    De Bunt, Martijn Van
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England..
    Pearson, Richard D.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Kumar, Ashish
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Basel, Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Chron Dis Epidemiol, Basel, Switzerland..
    Muller-Nurasyid, Martina
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Genet Epidemiol, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Neuherberg, Germany.;Univ Hosp Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilians Univ, Dept Med I, Munich, Germany.;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, IBE, Chair Genet Epidemiol, Fac Med, Munich, Germany.;DZHK German Ctr Cardiovascular Res, Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany..
    Grarup, Niels
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Stringham, Heather M.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Gamazon, Eric R.
    Univ Chicago, Med Genet Sect, Dept Med, Chicago, IL USA..
    Lee, Jaehoon
    Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Stat, Seoul, South Korea..
    Chen, Yuhui
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Scott, Robert A.
    Univ Cambridge, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge, England..
    Below, Jennifer E.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, Sch Publ Hlth, Ctr Human Genet, Houston, TX USA..
    Chen, Peng
    Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Saw Swee Hock Sch Publ Hlth, Singapore, Singapore..
    Huang, Jinyan
    Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA..
    Go, Min Jin
    Korea Natl Inst Hlth, Ctr Genome Sci, Chungcheongbukdo, South Korea..
    Stitzel, Michael L.
    Jackson Lab Genom Med, Farmington, CT USA..
    Pasko, Dorota
    Univ Exeter, Univ Exeter Med Sch, Genet Complex Traits, Exeter, Devon, England..
    Parker, Stephen C. J.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Computat Med Bioinformat, Ann Arbor, MI USA.;Univ Michigan, Dept Human Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Varga, Tibor V.
    Lund Univ, Lund Univ Diabet Ctr, Dept Clin Sci, Genet & Mol Epidemiol Unit, Malmo, Sweden..
    Green, Todd
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Beer, Nicola L.
    Univ Oxford, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England..
    Day-Williams, Aaron G.
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Dept Human Genet, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, England..
    Ferreira, Teresa
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Fingerlin, Tasha
    Univ Colorado, Colorado Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Aurora, CO USA..
    Horikoshi, Momoko
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England..
    Hu, Cheng
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Shanghai Diabet Inst, Dept Endocrinol & Metab, Sixth Peoples Hosp, Shanghai, Peoples R China..
    Huh, Iksoo
    Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Stat, Seoul, South Korea..
    Ikram, Mohammad Kamran
    Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Dept Ophthalmol, Singapore, Singapore.;Eye Acad Clin Programme, Duke NUS Grad Med Sch, Singapore, Singapore..
    Kim, Bong-Jo
    Korea Natl Inst Hlth, Ctr Genome Sci, Chungcheongbukdo, South Korea..
    Kim, Yongkang
    Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Stat, Seoul, South Korea..
    Kim, Young Jin
    Korea Natl Inst Hlth, Ctr Genome Sci, Chungcheongbukdo, South Korea..
    Kwon, Min-Seok
    Seoul Natl Univ, Interdisciplinary Program Bioinformat, Seoul, South Korea..
    Lee, Juyoung
    Korea Natl Inst Hlth, Ctr Genome Sci, Chungcheongbukdo, South Korea..
    Lee, Selyeong
    Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Stat, Seoul, South Korea..
    Lin, Keng-Han
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Maxwell, Taylor J.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, Sch Publ Hlth, Ctr Human Genet, Houston, TX USA..
    Nagai, Yoshihiko
    McGill Univ, Genome Quebec Innovat Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3A 2T5, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;Res Inst McGill Univ Hlth Ctr, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Wang, Xu
    Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Saw Swee Hock Sch Publ Hlth, Singapore, Singapore..
    Welch, Ryan P.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Yoon, Joon
    Seoul Natl Univ, Interdisciplinary Program Bioinformat, Seoul, South Korea..
    Zhang, Weihua
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England.;Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Dept Cardiol, Southall, Middx, England..
    Barzilai, Nir
    Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Med, New York, NY USA.;Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Genet, New York, NY USA..
    Voight, Benjamin F.
    Univ Pennsylvania, Dept Syst Pharmacol & Translat Therapeut, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA USA.;Univ Pennsylvania, Dept Genet, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA USA..
    Han, Bok-Ghee
    Korea Natl Inst Hlth, Ctr Genome Sci, Chungcheongbukdo, South Korea..
    Jenkinson, Christopher P.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Med, San Antonio, TX USA.;South Texas Vet Hlth Care Syst, Res, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Kuulasmaa, Teemu
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med, Fac Hlth Sci, Internal Med, Kuopio, Finland..
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med, Fac Hlth Sci, Internal Med, Kuopio, Finland.;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Kuopio, Finland..
    Manning, Alisa
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Ng, Maggie C. Y.
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Ctr Genom & Personalized Med Res, Winston Salem, NC USA.;Wake Forest Sch Med, Ctr Diabet Res, Winston Salem, NC USA..
    Palmer, Nicholette D.
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Ctr Genom & Personalized Med Res, Winston Salem, NC USA.;Wake Forest Sch Med, Ctr Diabet Res, Winston Salem, NC USA.;Wake Forest Sch Med, Dept Biochem, Winston Salem, NC USA..
    Balkau, Beverley
    Inserm U1018, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Villejuif, France..
    Stancakova, Alena
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med, Fac Hlth Sci, Internal Med, Kuopio, Finland..
    Abboud, Hanna E.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Med, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Boeing, Heiner
    German Inst Human Nutr Potsdam Rehbrucke, Nuthetal, Germany..
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Geriatrik.
    Prabhakaran, Dorairaj
    Ctr Chron Dis Control, New Delhi, India..
    Gottesman, Omri
    Charles Bronfman Inst Personalized Med, Icahn Sch Med, Mt Sinai, New York, NY USA..
    Scott, James
    Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Cardiovascular Sci, Imperial Coll London, Hammersmith Campus, London, England..
    Carey, Jason
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Kwan, Phoenix
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Grant, George
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Smith, Joshua D.
    Univ Washington Sch Med, Dept Genome Sci, Seattle, WA USA..
    Neale, Benjamin M.
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Med, Analyt & Translat Genet Unit, Boston, MA USA..
    Purcell, Shaun
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Med, Ctr Genom Med, Boston, MA USA.;Icahn Inst Genom & Multiscale Biol, Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Psychiat, New York, NY USA..
    Butterworth, Adam S.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England..
    Howson, Joanna M. M.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England..
    Lee, Heung Man
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Med & Therapeut, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Lu, Yingchang
    Charles Bronfman Inst Personalized Med, Icahn Sch Med, Mt Sinai, New York, NY USA..
    Kwak, Soo-Heon
    Seoul Natl Univ Coll Med, Dept Internal Med, Seoul, South Korea..
    Zhao, Wei
    Univ Pennsylvania, Dept Med, Philadelphia, PA USA..
    Danesh, John
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Dept Human Genet, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, England.;Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.;Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, NIHR Blood & Transplant Res Unit Donor Hlth & Gen, Cambridge, England..
    Lam, Vincent K. L.
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Med & Therapeut, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Park, Kyong Soo
    Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Mol Med & Biopharmaceut Sci, Grad Sch Convergence Sci & Technol, Seoul, South Korea.;Seoul Natl Univ, Coll Med, Seoul, South Korea..
    Saleheen, Danish
    Univ Pennsylvania, Dept Biostatist & Epidemiol, Philadelphia, PA USA.;Ctr Non Communicable Dis, Karachi, Pakistan..
    So, Wing Yee
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Med & Therapeut, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Tam, Claudia H. T.
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Med & Therapeut, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Afzal, Uzma
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England..
    Aguilar, David
    Baylor Coll Med, Cardiovascular Div, Houston, TX USA..
    Arya, Rector
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Pediat, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Aung, Tin
    Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Dept Ophthalmol, Singapore, Singapore.;Eye Acad Clin Programme, Duke NUS Grad Med Sch, Singapore, Singapore..
    Chan, Edmund
    Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Dept Med, Singapore, Singapore..
    Navarro, Carmen
    Murcia Reg Hlth Council, Dept Epidemiol, IMIB Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.;CIBER Epidemiol Salud Publ CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain.;Univ Murcia, Sch Med, Unit Prevent Med & Publ Hlth, Murcia, Spain..
    Cheng, Ching-Yu
    Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Saw Swee Hock Sch Publ Hlth, Singapore, Singapore.;Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Dept Ophthalmol, Singapore, Singapore.;Eye Acad Clin Programme, Duke NUS Grad Med Sch, Singapore, Singapore..
    Palli, Domenico
    Canc Res & Prevent Inst ISPO, Florence, Italy..
    Correa, Adolfo
    Univ Mississippi Med Ctr, Dept Med, Jackson, MS USA..
    Curran, Joanne E.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, San Antonio Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Reg Acad Hlth Ctr, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Brownsville, TX USA..
    Rybin, Dennis
    Boston Univ Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostatist, Boston, MA USA..
    Farook, Vidya S.
    Texas Biomed Res Inst, Dept Genet, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Fowler, Sharon P.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Med, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Freedman, Barry I.
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Nephrol Sect, Dept Internal Med, Winston Salem, NC USA..
    Griswold, Michael
    Univ Mississippi, Med Ctr, Ctr Biostat & Bioinformat, Jackson, MS 39216 USA..
    Hale, Daniel Esten
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Pediat, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Hicks, Pamela J.
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Ctr Genom & Personalized Med Res, Winston Salem, NC USA.;Wake Forest Sch Med, Ctr Diabet Res, Winston Salem, NC USA.;Wake Forest Sch Med, Dept Biochem, Winston Salem, NC USA..
    Khor, Chiea-Chuen
    Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Saw Swee Hock Sch Publ Hlth, Singapore, Singapore.;Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Dept Ophthalmol, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Dept Paediat, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Singapore, Singapore..
    Kumar, Satish
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, San Antonio Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Reg Acad Hlth Ctr, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Brownsville, TX USA..
    Lehne, Benjamin
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England..
    Thuillier, Dorothee
    Univ Lille, Lille Pasteur Inst, CNRS UMR8199, Lille, France..
    Lim, Wei Yen
    Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Saw Swee Hock Sch Publ Hlth, Singapore, Singapore..
    Liu, Jianjun
    Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Saw Swee Hock Sch Publ Hlth, Singapore, Singapore.;ASTAR, Genome Inst Singapore, Divis Human Genet, Singapore, Singapore..
    Loh, Marie
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England.;Univ Oulu, Inst Hlth Sci, Oulu, Finland.;ASTAR, Translat Lab Genet Med TLGM, Singapore, Singapore..
    Musani, Solomon K.
    Univ Mississippi, Med Ctr, Jackson Heart Study, Jackson, MS 39216 USA..
    Puppala, Sobha
    Texas Biomed Res Inst, Dept Genet, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Scott, William R.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England..
    Yengo, Loic
    Univ Lille, Lille Pasteur Inst, CNRS UMR8199, Lille, France..
    Tan, Sian-Tsung
    Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Dept Cardiol, Southall, Middx, England.;Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Cardiovascular Sci, Imperial Coll London, Hammersmith Campus, London, England..
    Taylor, Herman A.
    Univ Mississippi Med Ctr, Dept Med, Jackson, MS USA..
    Thameem, Farook
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Med, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Wilson, Gregory
    Jackson State Univ, Coll Publ Serv, Jackson, MS USA..
    Wong, Tien Yin
    Singapore Natl Eye Ctr, Singapore Eye Res Inst, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Dept Ophthalmol, Singapore, Singapore.;Eye Acad Clin Programme, Duke NUS Grad Med Sch, Singapore, Singapore..
    Njolstad, Pal Rasmus
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, KG Jebsen Ctr Diabet Res, Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Pediat, Bergen, Norway..
    Levy, Jonathan C.
    Univ Oxford, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England..
    Mangino, Massimo
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, London, England.;Guys & St Thomas Fdn Trust, NIHR Biomed Res Ctr, London, England..
    Bonnycastle, Lori L.
    NIH, Natl Human Genome Res Inst, Med Genom & Metab Genet Branch, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Schwarzmayr, Thomas
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Human Genet, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Neuherberg, Germany..
    Fadista, Joao
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Diabet & Endocrinol, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Surdulescu, Gabriela L.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, London, England..
    Herder, Christian
    Heinrich Heine Univ, German Diabet Ctr, Leibniz Ctr Diabet Res, Inst Clin Diabetol, Dusseldorf, Germany.;German Ctr Diabet Res DZD, Munich, Germany..
    Groves, Christopher J.
    Univ Oxford, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England..
    Wieland, Thomas
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Human Genet, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Neuherberg, Germany..
    Bork-Jensen, Jette
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Brandslund, Ivan
    Univ Southern Denmark, Inst Reg Hlth Res, Odense, Denmark.;Vejle Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, Vejle, Denmark..
    Christensen, Cramer
    Vejle Hosp, Dept Internal Med & Endocrinol, Vejle, Denmark..
    Koistinen, Heikki A.
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Abdominal Ctr Endocrinol, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Cent Hosp, Abdominal Ctr Endocrinol, Helsinki, Finland.;Minerva Fdn, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Dept Med, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Cent Hosp, Dept Med, Helsinki, Finland..
    Doney, Alex S. F.
    Med Res Inst, Ninewells Hosp & Med Sch, Divis Cardiovascular & Diabet Med, Dundee, Scotland..
    Kinnunen, Leena
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Hlth, Helsinki, Finland..
    Esko, Tonu
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA.;Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, Tartu, Estonia.;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Genet, Boston, MA USA.;Boston Childrens Hosp, Divis Endocrinol, Boston, MA USA..
    Farmer, Andrew J.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Primary Care Hlth Sci, Oxford, England..
    Hakaste, Liisa
    Univ Helsinki, Abdominal Ctr Endocrinol, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Cent Hosp, Abdominal Ctr Endocrinol, Helsinki, Finland.;Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Res Programs Unit, Diabet & Obes, Helsinki, Finland..
    Hodgkiss, Dylan
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, London, England..
    Kravic, Jasmina
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Diabet & Endocrinol, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Lyssenko, Valeriya
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, KG Jebsen Ctr Diabet Res, Bergen, Norway.;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Diabet & Endocrinol, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Hollensted, Mette
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Jorgensen, Marit E.
    Steno Diabet Ctr, Gentofte, Denmark..
    Jorgensen, Torben
    Capital Region Denmark, Res Ctr Prevent & Hlth, Glostrup, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Inst Hlth Sci, Dept Publ Hlth, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Aalborg Univ, Fac Med, Aalborg, Denmark..
    Ladenvall, Claes
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Diabet & Endocrinol, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Justesen, Johanne Marie
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Karajamaki, Annemari
    Vaasa Cent Hosp, Dept Primary Hlth Care, Vaasa, Finland.;Vaasa Hlth Care Ctr, Ctr Diabet, Vaasa, Finland..
    Kriebel, Jennifer
    German Ctr Diabet Res DZD, Munich, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol II, Neuherberg, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Neuherberg, Germany..
    Rathmann, Wolfgang
    German Ctr Diabet Res DZD, Munich, Germany.;Heinrich Heine Univ, German Diabet Ctr, Leibniz Ctr Diabet Res, Inst Biometr & Epidemiol, Dusseldorf, Germany..
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Geriatrik.
    Lauritzen, Torsten
    Aarhus Univ, Sect Gen Practice, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Narisu, Narisu
    NIH, Natl Human Genome Res Inst, Med Genom & Metab Genet Branch, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Linneberg, Allan
    Capital Region Denmark, Res Ctr Prevent & Hlth, Glostrup, Denmark.;Dept Clin Expt Res, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Dept Clin Med, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Melander, Olle
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Hypertens & Cardiovascular Dis, Malmo, Sweden..
    Milani, Lili
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, Tartu, Estonia..
    Neville, Matt
    Univ Oxford, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England.;Oxford Univ Hosp Trust, Oxford NIHR Biomed Res Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Diabet & Cardiovascular Dis, Genet Epidemiol, Malmo, Sweden..
    Qi, Lu
    Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp & Harvard Med Sch, Channing Div Network Med, Dept Med, Boston, MA USA..
    Qi, Qibin
    Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA.;Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, New York, NY USA..
    Roden, Michael
    Heinrich Heine Univ, German Diabet Ctr, Leibniz Ctr Diabet Res, Inst Clin Diabetol, Dusseldorf, Germany.;German Ctr Diabet Res DZD, Munich, Germany.;Heinrich Heine Univ, Fac Med, Divis Endocrinol & Diabetol, Dusseldorf, Germany..
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden..
    Swift, Amy
    NIH, Natl Human Genome Res Inst, Med Genom & Metab Genet Branch, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Rosengren, Anders H.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Diabet & Endocrinol, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden..
    Stirrups, Kathleen
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Dept Human Genet, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, England..
    Wood, Andrew R.
    Univ Exeter, Univ Exeter Med Sch, Genet Complex Traits, Exeter, Devon, England..
    Mihailov, Evelin
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, Tartu, Estonia..
    Blancher, Christine
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Oxford Genom Ctr, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Carneiro, Mauricio O.
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Maguire, Jared
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Poplin, Ryan
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Shakir, Khalid
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Fennell, Timothy
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    DePristo, Mark
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    De Angelis, Martin Hrabe
    German Ctr Diabet Res DZD, Munich, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Expt Genet, Neuherberg, Germany.;Tech Univ Munich, Ctr Life & Food Sci Weihenstephan, Freising Weihenstephan, Germany..
    Deloukas, Panos
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Dept Human Genet, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, England.;Queen Mary Univ London, William Harvey Res Inst, London, England.;Queen Mary Univ London, London Sch Med & Dent, London, England.;King Abdulaziz Univ, Princess Jawhara Brahim Ctr Excellence Res Heredi, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia..
    Gjesing, Anette P.
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Jun, Goo
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA.;Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, Sch Publ Hlth, Ctr Human Genet, Houston, TX USA..
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Med, Malmo, Sweden..
    Murphy, Jacquelyn
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Onofrio, Robert
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Thorand, Barbara
    German Ctr Diabet Res DZD, Munich, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol II, Neuherberg, Germany..
    Hansen, Torben
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Southern Denmark, Fac Hlth Sci, Odense, Denmark..
    Meisinger, Christa
    German Ctr Diabet Res DZD, Munich, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol II, Neuherberg, Germany..
    Hu, Frank B.
    Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA..
    Isomaa, Bo
    Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.;Dept Social Serv & Hlth Care, Pietarsaari, Finland..
    Karpe, Fredrik
    Univ Oxford, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England.;Oxford Univ Hosp Trust, Oxford NIHR Biomed Res Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Liang, Liming
    Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostatist, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA..
    Peters, Annette
    DZHK German Ctr Cardiovascular Res, Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany.;German Ctr Diabet Res DZD, Munich, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol II, Neuherberg, Germany..
    Huth, Cornelia
    German Ctr Diabet Res DZD, Munich, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol II, Neuherberg, Germany..
    O'Rahilly, Stephen P.
    Univ Cambridge, Inst Metab Sci, Metabol Res Labs, Cambridge, England..
    Palmer, Colin N. A.
    Ninewells Hosp & Med Sch, Pat Macpherson Ctr Pharmacogenet & Pharmacogenet, Dundee, Scotland.;Ninewells Hosp & Med Sch, Med Res Inst, Dundee, Scotland..
    Pedersen, Oluf
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Rauramaa, Rainer
    Kuopio Res Inst Exercise Med, Foundat Res Hlth Exercise & Nutr, Kuopio, Finland..
    Tuomilehto, Jaakko
    Danube Univ Krems, Ctr Vasc Prevent, Krems, Austria.;King Abdulaziz Univ, Diabetes Res Grp, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.;Dasman Diabet Inst, Kuwait, Kuwait.;Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Helsinki, Finland..
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Helsinki, Finland..
    Watanabe, Richard M.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Physiol Biophys, Los Angeles, CA USA.;Univ Southern Calif, Diabet & Obes Res Inst, Keck Sch Med, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Molekylär medicin. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bergman, Richard N.
    Cedars Sinai Diabet & Obes Res Inst, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan
    CSIR Inst Genom Integrat Biol CSIR IGIB, Funct Genom Unit, New Delhi, India..
    Bottinger, Erwin P.
    Charles Bronfman Inst Personalized Med, Icahn Sch Med, Mt Sinai, New York, NY USA..
    Cho, Yoon Shin
    Hallym Univ, Dept Biomed Sci, Chunchon, South Korea..
    Chandak, Giriraj R.
    CSIR, Ctr Cellular & Mol Biol, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India..
    Chan, Juliana Cn
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Med & Therapeut, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Li Ka Shing Inst Hlth Sci, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Hong Kong Inst Diabet & Obes, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Chia, Kee Seng
    Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Saw Swee Hock Sch Publ Hlth, Singapore, Singapore..
    Daly, Mark J.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Med, Analyt & Translat Genet Unit, Boston, MA USA..
    Ebrahim, Shah B.
    Ctr Chron Dis Control, New Delhi, India..
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Univ Cambridge, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge, England..
    Elliott, Paul
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England.;Imperial Coll London, MRC PHE Ctr Environm & Hlth, London, England..
    Jablonski, Kathleen A.
    George Washington Univ, Biostatist Ctr, Rockville, MD USA..
    Lehman, Donna M.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Med, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Jia, Weiping
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Shanghai Diabet Inst, Dept Endocrinol & Metab, Sixth Peoples Hosp, Shanghai, Peoples R China..
    Ma, Ronald Cw
    Boston Univ Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostatist, Boston, MA USA.;Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Dept Med & Therapeut, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Li Ka Shing Inst Hlth Sci, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Hong Kong Inst Diabet & Obes, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Pollin, Toni I.
    Univ Maryland Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Dept Med, Baltimore, MD USA.;Univ Maryland Sch Med, Program Personalized Genom Med, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Sandhu, Manjinder
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Dept Human Genet, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, England.;Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England..
    Tandon, Nikhil
    All India Inst Med Sci, Dept Endocrinol & Metab, New Delhi, India..
    Froguel, Philippe
    Univ Lille, Lille Pasteur Inst, CNRS UMR8199, Lille, France.;Imperial Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Genom Common Dis, London, England..
    Barroso, Ines
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Dept Human Genet, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, England.;Univ Cambridge, Inst Metab Sci, Metabol Res Labs, Cambridge, England..
    Teo, Yik Ying
    Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Saw Swee Hock Sch Publ Hlth, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Singapore, Inst Life Sci, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Stat & Appl Probabil, Singapore, Singapore..
    Zeggini, Eleftheria
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Dept Human Genet, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, England..
    Loos, Ruth J. F.
    Charles Bronfman Inst Personalized Med, Icahn Sch Med, Mt Sinai, New York, NY USA..
    Small, Kerrin S.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, London, England..
    Ried, Janina S.
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Genet Epidemiol, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Neuherberg, Germany..
    DeFronzo, Ralph A.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Med, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Grallert, Harald
    German Ctr Diabet Res DZD, Munich, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol II, Neuherberg, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Neuherberg, Germany..
    Glaser, Benjamin
    Hadassah Hebrew Univ Med Ctr, Endocrinol & Metab Serv, Jerusalem, Israel..
    Metspalu, Andres
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, Tartu, Estonia..
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Univ Cambridge, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge, England..
    Walker, Mark
    Newcastle Univ, Inst Cellular Med, Sch Med, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Banks, Eric
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Gieger, Christian
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Genet Epidemiol, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Neuherberg, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol II, Neuherberg, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Neuherberg, Germany..
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Molekylär epidemiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.
    Im, Hae Kyung
    Univ Chicago, Med Genet Sect, Dept Med, Chicago, IL USA..
    Illig, Thomas
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Neuherberg, Germany.;Hannover Med Sch, Hannover Unified Biobank, Hannover, NH, Germany.;Hannover Med Sch, Dept Human Genet, Hannover, NH, Germany..
    Franks, Paul W.
    Lund Univ, Lund Univ Diabet Ctr, Dept Clin Sci, Genet & Mol Epidemiol Unit, Malmo, Sweden.;Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA.;Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden..
    Buck, Gemma
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Oxford Genom Ctr, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Trakalo, Joseph
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Oxford Genom Ctr, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Buck, David
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Oxford Genom Ctr, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England..
    Prokopenko, Inga
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England.;Imperial Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Genom Common Dis, London, England..
    Magi, Reedik
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, Tartu, Estonia..
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiovaskulär epidemiologi.
    Farjoun, Yossi
    Broad Inst, Data Sci & Data Engn, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Owen, Katharine R.
    Univ Oxford, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England.;Oxford Univ Hosp Trust, Oxford NIHR Biomed Res Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Gloyn, Anna L.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England.;Oxford Univ Hosp Trust, Oxford NIHR Biomed Res Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Strauch, Konstantin
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Genet Epidemiol, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Neuherberg, Germany.;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, IBE, Chair Genet Epidemiol, Fac Med, Munich, Germany..
    Tuomi, Tiinamaija
    Univ Helsinki, Abdominal Ctr Endocrinol, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Cent Hosp, Abdominal Ctr Endocrinol, Helsinki, Finland.;Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Res Programs Unit, Diabet & Obes, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Finnish Inst Mol Med, Helsinki, Finland..
    Kooner, Jaspal Singh
    Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Dept Cardiol, Southall, Middx, England.;Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Cardiovascular Sci, Imperial Coll London, Hammersmith Campus, London, England.;Imperial Coll London, Imperial Coll Healthcare NHS Trust, London, England..
    Lee, Jong-Young
    Korea Natl Inst Hlth, Ctr Genome Sci, Chungcheongbukdo, South Korea..
    Park, Taesung
    Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Stat, Seoul, South Korea.;Seoul Natl Univ, Interdisciplinary Program Bioinformat, Seoul, South Korea..
    Donnelly, Peter
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Dept Stat, Oxford, England..
    Morris, Andrew D.
    Ninewells Hosp & Med Sch, Ctr Mol Med, Clin Res Ctr, Dundee, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Hattersley, Andrew T.
    Univ Exeter, Univ Exeter Med Sch, Exeter, Devon, England..
    Bowden, Donald W.
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Ctr Genom & Personalized Med Res, Winston Salem, NC USA.;Wake Forest Sch Med, Ctr Diabet Res, Winston Salem, NC USA.;Wake Forest Sch Med, Dept Biochem, Winston Salem, NC USA..
    Collins, Francis S.
    NIH, Natl Human Genome Res Inst, Med Genom & Metab Genet Branch, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Atzmon, Gil
    Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Med, New York, NY USA.;Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Genet, New York, NY USA.;Univ Haifa, Dept Nat Sci, Haifa, Israel..
    Chambers, John C.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England.;Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Dept Cardiol, Southall, Middx, England.;Imperial Coll London, Imperial Coll Healthcare NHS Trust, London, England..
    Spector, Timothy D.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, London, England..
    Laakso, Markku
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med, Fac Hlth Sci, Internal Med, Kuopio, Finland.;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Kuopio, Finland..
    Strom, Tim M.
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Human Genet, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Neuherberg, Germany.;Tech Univ Munich, Inst Human Genet, Munich, Germany..
    Bell, Graeme I.
    Univ Chicago, Dept Med, Chicago, IL USA.;Univ Chicago, Dept Human Genet, Chicago, IL USA..
    Blangero, John
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, San Antonio Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, Reg Acad Hlth Ctr, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Brownsville, TX USA..
    Duggirala, Ravindranath
    Texas Biomed Res Inst, Dept Genet, San Antonio, TX USA..
    Tai, EShyong
    Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Saw Swee Hock Sch Publ Hlth, Singapore, Singapore.;Natl Univ Singapore, Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Yong Loo Lin Sch Med, Dept Med, Singapore, Singapore.;Duke NUS Med Sch Singapore, Cardiovascular Metab Disorders Program, Singapore, Singapore..
    McVean, Gilean
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Li Ka Shing Ctr Hlth Informat & Discovery, Oxford, England..
    Hanis, Craig L.
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, Sch Publ Hlth, Ctr Human Genet, Houston, TX USA..
    Wilson, James G.
    Univ Mississippi Med Ctr, Dept Physiol & Biophys, Jackson, MS USA..
    Seielstad, Mark
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Lab Med, Inst Human Genet, San Francisco, CA USA.;Blood Syst Res Inst, San Francisco, CA USA..
    Frayling, Timothy M.
    Univ Exeter, Univ Exeter Med Sch, Genet Complex Traits, Exeter, Devon, England..
    Meigs, James B.
    Harvard Med Sch, Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Gen Med, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Med, Boston, MA USA..
    Cox, Nancy J.
    Univ Chicago, Med Genet Sect, Dept Med, Chicago, IL USA..
    Sladek, Rob
    McGill Univ, Genome Quebec Innovat Ctr, Montreal, PQ H3A 2T5, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Med, Divis Endocrinol & Metab, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Lander, Eric S.
    MIT, Broad Inst, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Gabriel, Stacey
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Mohlke, Karen L.
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Genet, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Meitinger, Thomas
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Human Genet, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Neuherberg, Germany.;Tech Univ Munich, Inst Human Genet, Munich, Germany..
    Groop, Leif
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Diabet & Endocrinol, Ctr Diabet, Malmo, Sweden.;Univ Helsinki, Finnish Inst Mol Med, Helsinki, Finland..
    Abecasis, Goncalo
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Scott, Laura J.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Morris, Andrew P.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, Tartu, Estonia.;Univ Liverpool, Dept Biostat, Liverpool, Merseyside, England..
    Kang, Hyun Min
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Mol Biol, Boston, MA USA..
    Altshuler, David
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Mol Biol, Boston, MA USA.;Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Genet, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Med, Boston, MA USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Med, Diabet Res Ctr Diabet Unit, Boston, MA USA.;MIT, Dept Biol, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Burtt, Noel P.
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA..
    Florez, Jose C.
    Broad Inst, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Med, Ctr Genom Med, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Med, Boston, MA USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Med, Diabet Res Ctr Diabet Unit, Boston, MA USA..
    Boehnke, Michael
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    McCarthy, Mark I.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Med, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.;Univ Oxford, Radcliffe Dept Med, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford, England.;Oxford Univ Hosp Trust, Oxford NIHR Biomed Res Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Data Descriptor: Sequence data and association statistics from 12,940 type 2 diabetes cases and controls2017Inngår i: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 4, artikkel-id 170179Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) to high resolution, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia catalogued variation from whole-genome sequencing of 2,657 European individuals and exome sequencing of 12,940 individuals of multiple ancestries. Over 27M SNPs, indels, and structural variants were identified, including 99% of low-frequency (minor allele frequency [MAF] 0.1-5%) non-coding variants in the whole-genome sequenced individuals and 99.7% of low-frequency coding variants in the whole-exome sequenced individuals. Each variant was tested for association with T2D in the sequenced individuals, and, to increase power, most were tested in larger numbers of individuals (> 80% of low-frequency coding variants in similar to ~82 K Europeans via the exome chip, and similar to ~90% of low-frequency non-coding variants in similar to ~44 K Europeans via genotype imputation). The variants, genotypes, and association statistics from these analyses provide the largest reference to date of human genetic information relevant to T2D, for use in activities such as T2D-focused genotype imputation, functional characterization of variants or genes, and other novel analyses to detect associations between sequence variation and T2D.

  • Hotopp, Julie C. Dunning
    et al.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Greenebaum Canc Ctr, Inst Genome Sci,Dept Microbiol & Immunol, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Klasson, Lisa
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Molekylär evolution.
    The Complexities and Nuances of Analyzing the Genome of Drosophila ananassae and Its Wolbachia Endosymbiont2018Inngår i: G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, ISSN 2160-1836, E-ISSN 2160-1836, Vol. 8, nr 1, s. 373-374Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In "Retrotransposons Are the Major Contributors to the Expansion of the Drosophila ananassae Muller F Element," Leung et al. (2017) improved contigs attributed to the Muller F element from the original CAF1 assembly, and used them to conclude that most of the sequence expansion of the fourth chromosome of D. ananassae is due to a higher transposon load than previously thought, but is not due to Wolbachia DNA integrations. While we do not disagree with the first conclusion, the authors base their second conclusion on the lack of homology detected between their improved CAF1 genome assembly attributed to D. ananassae and reference Wolbachia genomes. While the consensus CAF1 genome assembly lacks any sequence similarity to the reference genome of the Wolbachia endosymbiont of Drosophila melanogaster (wMel), numerous studies from multiple laboratories provide experimental support for a large lateral/horizontal gene transfer (LGT) of a Wolbachia genome into this D. ananassae line. As such, we strongly suspect that the original whole genome assembly was either constructed after the removal of all Wolbachia reads, or that Wolbachia sequences were directly removed from the contigs in the CAF1 assembly. Hence, Leung et al. (2017) could not have identified the Wolbachia LGT using the CAF1 assembly. This manuscript by Leung et al. (2017) highlights that an assembly of the Wolbachia sequence reads and their mate pairs was erroneously attributed solely to the Wolbachia endosymbiont, albeit before we understood the extent of LGT in D. ananassae. As such, we recommend that the sequences deposited at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) under PRJNA13365 should not be attributed to Wolbachia endosymbiont of D. ananassae, but should have their taxonomy reclassified by NCBI as "Unclassified sequences." As our knowledge about genome biology improves, we need to reconsider and reanalyze earlier genomes removing the prejudice introduced from now defunct paradigms.

  • Ujvari, Dorina
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jakson, Ivika
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Oldmark, Cecilia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Attarha, Sanaz
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för immunologi, genetik och patologi.
    Alkasalias, Twana
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumour & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Salahaddin Univ, Coll Sci, Dept Biol, Irbil, Kurdistan, Iraq..
    Salamon, Daniel
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gidlof, Sebastian
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hirschberg, Angelica Linden
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Prokineticin 1 is up-regulated by insulin in decidualizing human endometrial stromal cells2018Inngår i: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine (Print), ISSN 1582-1838, E-ISSN 1582-4934, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 163-172Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Prokineticin 1 (PROK1), a hypoxia-regulated angiogenic factor, has emerged as a crucial regulator of embryo implantation and placentation. Dysregulation of PROK1 has been linked to recurrent pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, foetal growth restriction and preterm birth. These pregnancy complications are common in women with obesity and polycystic ovary syndrome, i.e. conditions associated with insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinaemia. We investigated the effect of insulin on PROK1 expression during in vitro decidualization. Endometrial stromal cells were isolated from six healthy, regularly menstruating women and decidualized in vitro. Insulin induced a significant dose-dependent up-regulation of PROK1 on both mRNA and protein level in decidualizing endometrial stromal cells. This up-regulation was mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1 alpha) via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PROK1 did not affect the viability, but significantly inhibited the migration of endometrial stromal cells and the migratory and invasive capacity of trophoblast cell lines. This in vitro study provides new insights into the regulation of PROK1 by insulin in human decidualizing endometrial stromal cells, the action of PROK1 on migration of endometrial stromal cells, as well as migration and invasion of trophoblasts. We speculate that hyperinsulinaemia may be involved in the mechanisms by which PROK1 is linked to placenta-related pregnancy complications.

  • Simons, Greg
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Centrum för rysslandsstudier.
    Fake News:: As the Problem or a Symptom of a Deeper Problem?2018Inngår i: ОбразArtikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • Disputas: 2018-03-07 13:00 M 207, Sundsvall
    Große, Christine
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för naturvetenskap, teknik och medier, Avdelningen för informationssystem och -teknologi.
    Strategic Objectives in Complex Planning Environments: Insights from a Swedish Case for Critical Infrastructure Protection2018Licentiatavhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Large-scale and long-term planning imposes extensive requirements on governance efforts regardless of whether it involves public organisations, private organisations, or both. The proportions of such planning entangle many actors and stakeholders as system components within and around a complex system. These system components and conditions in a complex planning environment introduce a diverse variety of strategic objectives into the planning. This study investigates how strategic objectives can affect the governance of complex planning systems, particularly in the context of national critical infrastructure protection. For this purpose, this thesis concentrates on a national planning procedure, STYREL, which Sweden has recently implemented for the case of power shortages. This case involves various actors from the national, regional and local levels who act on behalf of both public and private organisations in a planning process with four-year intervals, and it thus constitutes a relevant subject for this study. The investigation entailed the collection of evidence from documents and interviews. First, publicly available Swedish documents regarding the case provided an understanding of the planning. Second, interviews with decision-makers who are entrusted with this planning at municipalities and county administrative boards as well as with a few planners from power grid providers offered a deeper comprehension of both the proceedings in practice and the strategic objectives involved in this complex system for planning of critical infrastructure protection. Particularly, the findings resulted in several conceptual models that demonstrate these understandings in more detail. A soft system model visualises the problem situation and contains several elements, such as the system components, interrelations and conditions. Moreover, a multi-level planning model specifies sources of uncertainty in the planning and decision-making process that are associated with an insufficient alignment of strategic objectives in the STYREL case. These decompositions of the Swedish planning environment – both horizontal and vertical – further enabled this study to identify significant parameters of the systemic conditions and strategic objectives involved in such complex planning environments that challenge their governance. The findings of this study suggest that the Swedish process is not yet fully developed. The investigation particularly indicates that a better alignment of strategic objectives is necessary to ensure a selection of adequate goals and means that advances the future usability of the produced plan, which in turn would legitimate and strengthen this complex planning process for critical infrastructure protection.

  • Hofmann, Bjørn
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway / University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för kultur och lärande, Centrum för praktisk kunskap.
    How medical technologies shape the experience of illness2018Inngår i: Life, ISSN 2195-7819, E-ISSN 2195-7819, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikkel-id 3Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we explore how diagnostic and therapeutic technologies shape the lived experiences of illness for patients. By analysing a wide range of examples, we identify six ways that technology can (trans)form the experience of illness (and health). First, technology may create awareness of disease by revealing asymptomatic signs or markers (imaging techniques, blood tests). Second, the technology can reveal risk factors for developing diseases (e.g., high blood pressure or genetic tests that reveal risks of falling ill in the future). Third, the technology can affect and change an already present illness experience (e.g., the way blood sugar measurement affects the perceived symptoms of diabetes). Fourth, therapeutic technologies may redefine our experiences of a certain condition as diseased rather than unfortunate (e.g. assisted reproductive technologies or symptom based diagnoses in psychiatry). Fifth, technology influences illness experiences through altering social-cultural norms and values regarding various diagnoses. Sixth, technology influences and changes our experiences of being healthy in contrast and relation to being diseased and ill. This typology of how technology forms illness and related conditions calls for reflection regarding the phenomenology of technology and health. How are medical technologies and their outcomes perceived and understood by patients? The phenomenological way of approaching illness as a lived, bodily being-in-the-world is an important approach for better understanding and evaluating the effects that medical technologies may have on our health, not only in defining, diagnosing, or treating diseases, but also in making us feel more vulnerable and less healthy in different regards.

  • Disputas: 2018-03-05 13:15 F3, Stockholm
    Belic, Jovana
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Beräkningsvetenskap och beräkningsteknik (CST).
    Untangling Cortico-Striatal Circuitry and its Role in Health and Disease - A computational investigation2018Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The basal ganglia (BG) play a critical role in a variety of regular motor and cognitive functions. Many brain diseases, such as Parkinson’s diseases, Huntington’s disease and dyskinesia, are directly related to malfunctions of the BG nuclei. One of those nuclei, the input nucleus called the striatum, is heavily connected to the cortex and receives afferents from nearly all cortical areas. The striatum is a recurrent inhibitory network that contains several distinct cell types. About 95% of neurons in the striatum are medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that form the only output from the striatum. Two of the most examined sources of GABAergic inhibition into MSNs are the feedback inhibition (FB) from the axon collaterals of the MSNs themselves, and the feedforward inhibition (FF) via the small population (1-2% of striatal neurons) of fast spiking interneurons (FSIs). The cortex sends direct projections to the striatum, while the striatum can affect the cortex only indirectly through other BG nuclei and the thalamus. Understanding how different components of the striatal network interact with each other and influence the striatal response to cortical inputs has crucial importance for clarifying the overall functions and dysfunctions of the BG.

        In this thesis I have employed advanced experimental data analysis techniques as well as computational modelling, to study the complex nature of cortico-striatal interactions. I found that for pathological states, such as Parkinson’s disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia, effective connectivity is bidirectional with an accent on the striatal influence on the cortex. Interestingly, in the case of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia, there was a high increase in effective connectivity at ~80 Hz and the results also showed a large relative decrease in the modulation of the local field potential amplitude (recorded in the primary motor cortex and sensorimotor striatum in awake, freely behaving, 6-OHDA lesioned hemi-parkinsonian rats) at ~80 Hz by the phase of low frequency oscillations. These results suggest a lack of coupling between the low frequency activity of a presumably larger neuronal population and the synchronized activity of a presumably smaller group of neurons active at 80 Hz.

        Next, I used a spiking neuron network model of the striatum to isolate the mechanisms underlying the transmission of cortical oscillations to the MSN population. I showed that FSIs play a crucial role in efficient propagation of cortical oscillations to the MSNs that did not receive direct cortical oscillations. Further, I have identified multiple factors such as the number of activated neurons, ongoing activity, connectivity, and synchronicity of inputs that influenced the transfer of oscillations by modifying the levels of FB and FF inhibitions. Overall, these findings reveal a new role of FSIs in modulating the transfer of information from the cortex to striatum. By modulating the activity and properties of the FSIs, striatal oscillations can be controlled very efficiently. Finally, I explored the interactions in the striatal network with different oscillation frequencies and showed that the features of those oscillations, such as amplitude and frequency fluctuations, can be influenced by a change in the input intensities into MSNs and FSIs and that these fluctuations are also highly dependent on the selected frequencies in addition to the phase offset between different cortical inputs.

        Lastly, I investigated how the striatum responds to cortical neuronal avalanches. Recordings in the striatum revealed that striatal activity was also characterized by spatiotemporal clusters that followed a power law distribution albeit, with significantly steeper slope. In this study, an abstract computational model was developed to elucidate the influence of intrastriatal inhibition and cortico-striatal interplay as important factors to understand the experimental findings. I showed that one particularly high activation threshold of striatal nodes can reproduce a power law-like distribution with a coefficient similar to the one found experimentally. By changing the ratio of excitation and inhibition in the cortical model, I saw that increased activity in the cortex strongly influenced striatal dynamics, which was reflected in a less negative slope of cluster size distributions in the striatum.  Finally, when inhibition was added to the model, cluster size distributions had a prominently earlier deviation from the power law distribution compared to the case when inhibition was not present. 

  • Disputas: 2018-03-02 10:00 ITC/2446, Uppsala
    Zafari, Afshin
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Matematisk-datavetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för informationsteknologi, Avdelningen för beräkningsvetenskap. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Matematisk-datavetenskapliga sektionen, Institutionen för informationsteknologi, Tillämpad beräkningsvetenskap.
    Advances in Task-Based Parallel Programming for Distributed Memory Architectures2018Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    It has become common knowledge that parallel programming is needed for scientific applications, particularly for running large scale simulations. Different programming models are introduced for simplifying parallel programming, while enabling an application to use the full computational capacity of the hardware. In task-based programming, all the variables in the program are abstractly viewed as data. Parallelism is provided by partitioning the data. A task is a collection of operations performed on input data to generate output data. In distributed memory environments, the data is distributed over the computational nodes (or processes), and is communicated when a task needs remote data.

    This thesis discusses advanced techniques in distributed task-based parallel programming, implemented in the DuctTeip software library. DuctTeip uses MPI (Message Passing Interface) for asynchronous inter-process communication and Pthreads for shared memory parallelization within the processes. The data dependencies that determine which subsets of tasks can be executed in parallel are extracted from information about the data accesses (input or output) of the tasks. A versioning system is used internally to represent the task-data dependencies efficiently. A hierarchical partitioning of tasks and data allows for independent optimization of the size of computational tasks and the size of communicated data. A data listener technique is used to manage communication efficiently.

    DuctTeip provides an algorithm independent dynamic load balancing functionality. Redistributing tasks from busy processes to idle processes dynamically can provide an overall shorter execution time. A random search method with high probability of success is employed for locating idle/busy nodes.

    The advantage of the abstract view of tasks and data is exploited in a unified programming interface, which provides a standard for task-based frameworks to decouple framework development from application development. The interface can be used for collaboration between different frameworks in running an application program efficiently on different hardware.

    To evaluate the DuctTeip programming model, applications such as Cholesky factorization, a time-dependent PDE solver for the shallow water equations, and the fast multipole method have been implemented using DuctTeip. Experiments show that DuctTeip provides both scalability and performance. Comparisons with similar frameworks such as StarPU, OmpSs, and PaRSEC show competitive results.

  • Aramrattana, Maytheewat
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Trafik och trafikant,TRAF, Körsimulering och visualisering, SIM. Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Modelling and Simulation for Evaluation of Cooperative Intelligent Transport System Functions2016Licentiatavhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Future vehicles are expected to be equipped with wireless communication tech- nology, that enables them to be “connected” to each others and road infras- tructures. Complementing current autonomous vehicles and automated driving systems, the wireless communication allows the vehicles to interact, cooperate, and be aware of its surroundings beyond their own sensors’ range. Such sys- tems are often referred to as Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS), which aims to provide extra safety, efficiency, and sustainability to transporta- tion systems. Several C-ITS applications are under development and will require thorough testing and evaluation before their deployment in the real-world. C- ITS depend on several sub-systems, which increase their complexity, and makes them difficult to evaluate.

    Simulations are often used to evaluate many different automotive appli- cations, including C-ITS. Although they have been used extensively, simulation tools dedicated to determine all aspects of C-ITS are rare, especially human fac- tors aspects, which are often ignored. The majority of the simulation tools for C-ITS rely heavily on different combinations of network and traffic simulators. The human factors issues have been covered in only a few C-ITS simulation tools, that involve a driving simulator. Therefore, in this thesis, a C-ITS simu- lation framework that combines driving, network, and traffic simulators is pre- sented. The simulation framework is able to evaluate C-ITS applications from three perspectives; a) human driver; b) wireless communication; and c) traffic systems.

    Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) and its applications are cho- sen as the first set of C-ITS functions to be evaluated. Example scenarios from CACC and platoon merging applications are presented, and used as test cases for the simulation framework, as well as to elaborate potential usages of it. Moreover, approaches, results, and challenges from composing the simulation framework are presented and discussed. The results shows the usefulness of the proposed simulation framework.

  • Andrén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Wikkelsö, Carsten
    Sundström, Nina
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper.
    Agerskov, Simon
    Israelsson, Hanna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmakologi och klinisk neurovetenskap.
    Laurell, Katarina
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmakologi och klinisk neurovetenskap.
    Hellström, Per
    Tullberg, Mats
    Long-term effects of complications and vascular comorbidity in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: a quality registry study2018Inngår i: Journal of Neurology, ISSN 0340-5354, E-ISSN 1432-1459, Vol. 265, nr 1, s. 178-186Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is little knowledge about the factors influencing the long-term outcome after surgery for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH).

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of reoperation due to complications and of vascular comorbidity (hypertension, diabetes, stroke and heart disease) on the outcome in iNPH patients, 2–6 years after shunt surgery.

    Methods: We included 979 patients from the Swedish Hydrocephalus Quality Registry (SHQR), operated on for iNPH during 2004–2011. The patients were followed yearly by mailed questionnaires, including a self-assessed modified Rankin Scale (smRS) and a subjective comparison between their present and their preoperative health condition. The replies were grouped according to the length of follow-up after surgery. Data on clinical evaluations, vascular comorbidity, and reoperations were extracted from the SHQR.

    Results: On the smRS, 40% (38–41) of the patients were improved 2–6 years after surgery and around 60% reported their general health condition to be better than preoperatively. Reoperation did not influence the outcome after 2–6 years. The presence of vascular comorbidity had no negative impact on the outcome after 2–6 years, assessed as improvement on the smRS or subjective improvement of the health condition, except after 6 years when patients with hypertension and a history of stroke showed a less favorable development on the smRS.

    Conclusion: This registry-based study shows no negative impact of complications and only minor effects of vascular comorbidity on the long-term outcome in iNPH.

  • Kraus, Anja
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakultetsnämnden för hälsa, socialt arbete och beteendevetenskap, Institutionen för pedagogik, psykologi och idrottsvetenskap, PPI.
    Informal Learning as a Challenge for School Development: Operationalizing the Tacit Dimensions of Democracy Education2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    By the concept of informal learning the fact can be grasped scientifically that we present our orientation in the everyday-world, our social engagement and our capabilities in different fields sometimes rather apart from our school knowledge. Informal learning nowadays plays a central role in scientific psychology and in education policy. Hence, different tools for the validation of informal learning have been developed (see: EQF, ECVET, ECTS, EQARF, EUROPASS). Informal learning is here mainly considered in terms of the acquisition of qualifications and vocational training. The theoretical aim of my contribution is to unfold a pedagogical understanding of informal learning. Here, I will stick to the hypothesis that considering informal learning in democracy education is a form of promoting disadvantaged learners. Hereby, the achievement gap is supposed to be reduced and the new social question is defused (cp. also Helsper 2001, Helsper & Lingkost 2001, Reich 2005, Abs & Verldhuis 2008, et al.). The principle of educational equality is deeply connected to the idea of democracy, especially according to John Deweys (1916, 1933) concept of „democracy as a way of life“. Informal learning eludes the governmental approach in pedagogy (Dohmen 2001 et al.). It has the character of implicit learning, including procedural, contextual, pre-reflexive, sensory aspects, and can be regarded as part of concepts such as experience-based learning, self-directed, or competence-oriented learning, etc. (Reber 1993 et al.). Our research on the tacit dimensions in pedagogy (Bergstedt et al. 2012) has shown that on one side informal learning is the indispensable basis of formal learning, that is to say, it makes learning possible. On the other side, it can be a hindrance for it. This is true e.g. for habitual insularities, indispensable conflicts of norms, or values that cause ideological narrow-mindedness.

    Methodology, Methods, Research Instruments or Sources Used By referring to the results of different empirical studies on democracy education and democracy in schools, I will work out what this means for the operationalization of the different aspects of democracy education: Conclusions, Expected Outcomes or Findings I present a schedule for the operationalization of the impact of informal learning on democracy education. 

  • Vigren, Andreas
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Samhälle, miljö och transporter, SAMT, Transportekonomi, TEK.
    Competition in Public Transport: Essays on competitive tendering and open-access competition in Sweden2017Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The results of this work show that the cost efficiency of tendered bus services is similar across all Swedish counties, except for the more high-density counties where efficiency is lower. Considerably lower efficiency is also found for contracts with services run in-house by the Public Transport Authority (PTA), compared to when the same service is run by a private actor. With respect to the competitive environment, it was found that many contract design factors have little or no effect on the number of bids that the PTA sees in their tenders. No measure that could be imposed by a single PTA was found to increase the total number of bidders by more than 0.5 bidders. However, the results suggest that PTAs as a collective could try to avoid tendering too many contracts at the same time because this was shown to reduce participation by up to about two bidders. In addition, these studies show that the local competitive environment is important for the PTAs to consider. The way in which contract areas are defined will also affect the participation rate as operators were found to participate in tenders to a lower extent the farther their workplaces are from the contract area. While larger operators appear to be less sensitive with respect to such distances, the fact that smaller operators are, and that they often bid as one unit as members of cooperation companies, makes the competitive environment important. The results suggest that depots could be included in the contract to stimulate participation, but this is by no means the only nor an easy solution.

    This thesis has also analyzed the entry made in 2015 by MTR Express (MTR) on the Stockholm-Gothenburg railway line. The overall conclusion is that customers are indeed facing lower prices one and a half years after the entry. MTR's prices are on average 100 SEK lower than the incumbent SJ's prices. Furthermore, the analysis shows that the incumbent’s prices have also gone down, by almost 13 percent, following the entry.

  • Nakamura, Moritaka
    et al.
    Claes, Andrea R.
    Grebe, Tobias
    Hermkes, Rebecca
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Viotti, Corrado
    Ikeda, Yoshihisa
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Grebe, Markus
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Auxin and ROP GTPase Signaling of Polar Nuclear Migration in Root Epidermal Hair Cells2018Inngår i: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 176, nr 1, s. 378-391Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Polar nuclear migration is crucial during the development of diverse eukaryotes. In plants, root hair growth requires polar nuclear migration into the outgrowing hair. However, knowledge about the dynamics and the regulatory mechanisms underlying nuclear movements in root epidermal cells remains limited. Here, we show that both auxin and Rho-of-Plant (ROP) signaling modulate polar nuclear position at the inner epidermal plasma membrane domain oriented to the cortical cells during cell elongation as well as subsequent polar nuclear movement to the outer domain into the emerging hair bulge in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Auxin signaling via the nuclear AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7 (ARF7)/ARF19 and INDOLE ACETIC ACID7 pathway ensures correct nuclear placement toward the inner membrane domain. Moreover, precise inner nuclear placement relies on SPIKE1 Rho-GEF, SUPERCENTIPEDE1 Rho-GDI, and ACTIN7 (ACT7) function and to a lesser extent on VTI11 vacuolar SNARE activity. Strikingly, the directionality and/or velocity of outer polar nuclear migration into the hair outgrowth along actin strands also are ACT7 dependent, auxin sensitive, and regulated by ROP signaling. Thus, our findings provide a founding framework revealing auxin and ROP signaling of inner polar nuclear position with some contribution by vacuolar morphology and of actin-dependent outer polar nuclear migration in root epidermal hair cells.

  • Kohl, Sebastian
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för bostads- och urbanforskning (IBF).
    Blackwell, Timothy
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för bostads- och urbanforskning (IBF).
    Urban heritages: how history and housing finance matter to housing form and homeownership rates2018Inngår i: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063XArtikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • Vieira, Tiago
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för arkitektur och samhällsbyggnad (ABE), Byggvetenskap, Byggnadsmaterial. VTI.
    Sandberg, Ulf
    VTI.
    Acoustical performance of winter tyres on two in-service road surfaces: a frequency spectrum analysis and comparison2017Inngår i: Proceedings of the Inter-Noise 2017, Hong Kong, 2017, s. 6825-6836Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • Disputas: 2018-03-01 10:00 F3, Stockholm
    Lundberg, Joacim
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Samhälle, miljö och transporter, SAMT, Miljö, MILJÖ. KTH.
    Non-Exhaust PM10 and Road Dust2018Licentiatavhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-exhaust PM10 is an issue in the urban environment linked to health issues. Emissions of non-exhaust PM10 is relatable to pavement properties. Also of importance is resuspension of road dust stored from surfaces. This depends on the traffic and metrological conditions. Given this, the purpose of the thesis was to give an overview limited to Sweden and the Nordic countries regarding non-exhaust PM10 emissions and road dust.

    The overview includes how particles are related to human health. Also included is the principle of how particles are emitted from road surface and tyre interaction, both directly and through resuspension of road dust. This thesis also includes an overview of how the use of studded tyres impact on asphalt surfacings and how the properties of the materials used impact on the abrasion wear. This is then linked to the emissions of non-exhaust particles. Further described is how measurements can be done of ambient particles and road dust, followed on two major models for road abrasion wear and non-exhaust PM prediction. Also included is how road operation, e.g. traction sanding and dust binding, influence the particle emissions together with other options to reduce the emissions through, e.g. limiting the use of studded tyres.

    One special issue discussed in this thesis is the lack of holistic view regarding the environmental problems in the urban environment with focus on particle emissions and road noise emissions, both from the road surface and tyre interaction. Currently the most problematic issue is prioritized and the resulting solution to that specific problem might increase other problems.

    This thesis shows that much knowledge is available regarding non-exhaust PM10 emissions and road dust, but also that several knowledge gaps exists. Several suggestions on further studies is given together with a brief overview on the continued work forward from this thesis.

  • Paina, Ligia
    et al.
    Wilkinson, Annie
    Tetui, Moses
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa. Department of Health Policy, Planning and Management, Makerere University School of Public Health, New Mulago Hospital Complex, Kampala, Uganda.
    Ekirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth
    Barman, Debjani
    Ahmed, Tanvir
    Mahmood, Shehrin Shaila
    Bloom, Gerry
    Knezovich, Jeff
    George, Asha
    Bennett, Sara
    Using Theories of Change to inform implementation of health systems research and innovation: experiences of Future Health Systems consortium partners in Bangladesh, India and Uganda2017Inngår i: Health Research Policy and Systems, ISSN 1478-4505, E-ISSN 1478-4505, Vol. 15, artikkel-id 109Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Theory of Change (ToC) is a management and evaluation too ! supporting critical thinking in the design, implementation and evaluation of development programmes. We document the experience of Future Health Systems (FHS) Consortium research teams in Bangladesh, India and Uganda with using ToC. We seek to understand how and why ToCs were applied and to clarify how they facilitate the implementation of iterative intervention designs and stakeholder engagement in health systems research and strengthening.

    Methods: This paper combines literature on ToC, with a summary of reflections by FHS research members on the motivation, development, revision and use of the ToC, as well as on the benefits and challenges of the process. We describe three FHS teams' experiences along four potential uses of ToCs, namely planning, communication, learning and. accountability.

    Results: The three teams developed ToCs for planning and. evaluation purposes as required for their initial plans for FHS in 2011 and. revised, them half-way through the project, based on assumptions informed, by and adjusted, through the teams' experiences during the previous 2 years of implementation. All teams found that the revised ToCs and their accompanying narratives recognised greater feedback among intervention components and among key stakeholders. The ToC development and. revision fostered, channels for both internal and external communication, among research team members and. with key stakeholders, respectively. The process of revising the ToCs challenged the teams' initial assumptions based on new evidence and experience. In contrast, the ToCs were only minimally used for accountability purposes.

    Conclusions: The ToC development and revision process helped FHS research teams, and occasionally key local stakeholders, to reflect on and make their assumptions and mental models about their respective interventions explicit. Other projects using the ToC should allow time for revising and reflecting upon the ToCs, to recognise and document the adaptive nature of health systems, and to foster the time, space and flexibility that health systems strengthening programmes must have to learn from implementation and stakeholder engagement.

  • High, Christopher
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Fakulteten för samhällsvetenskap (FSV), Institutionen för samhällsstudier (SS).
    Buckler, Alison
    Open University, UK.
    Teachers work: The tacit pedagogy of expert teachers in rural Malawi2017Inngår i: Presented at EADI-NORDIC 2017, 2017Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The status of school teachers in much ofrural Sub-Saharan Africa has a dual nature across many different countries. At the local level they are influential social actors, respectable people who are expected to provide a positive role model to their pupils and the wider local community. Within the national civil service, they are not often treated as very important - sometimes paid intermittently and frequently problematised as lacking in the capacit to deliver ambitious education-led national development strategies.

    In this paper we report on the results of a pilot study in rural Malawi, which sort to investigate the tacit knowledge and pedagogical skills of primary school teachers using participatory visual methods. Around a three week participatory video exercise with teachers from two schools, a combination of participatory action research, participant-observation, semi-structured and photo-elcited interviews and group reflection was analysed to understand how different data-gathering and analytical techniques could combine to surface and valorise the teachers' knowledge.

    Rather than a lack of skills and capacity, the data instead showed the range of skills and personal characteristics involved in the teachers' practice. Cognitive mapping on a subset of the data showed that the concept of active learning operationalised independently at two schools was (i) consisten, (ii) informed sophisticated practice, and (iii) was richer than that embedded in much external expert knowledge about teaching

  • Disputas: 2018-03-02 13:15 N430, Umeå
    Klechikov, Alexey
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysik.
    Graphite oxides for preparation of graphene related materials: structure, chemical modification and hydrogen storage properties2018Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon materials have been studied for hydrogen storage for decades, but they showed too low capacity at ambient temperature compared to target values for practical applications. This thesis includes two parts. First one is fundamental study of graphite oxides (GO) structure and properties. Second part is focused on hydrogen storage properties of graphene related materials prepared using GO as a precursor.

    We studied the effects of synthesis methods and oxidation degree on solvation/intercalation properties of GOs. New effect of temperature induced reversible delamination was observed for Hummers GO (HGO) immersed in liquid acetonitrile. Experiments with swelling of Brodie GO (BGO) in 1-octanol revealed parallel orientation of the intercalated solvent molecules relative to graphene oxide (GnO) layers. Chemical functionalization of GO in swelled state allowed us to synthesize the materials with subnanometer slit pores supported by molecular pillars. Structure and properties of pillared GO were characterized by variety of methods. Swelling properties of multilayered GnO membranes were compared to properties of precursor GO. GnO membranes were found to swell similarly to GO powders in some solvents and rather differently in other. Our experiments revealed important limitations in application of GO membranes for nanofiltration. Several parameters were found to affect the size of permeation “channels” provided by interlayers of GnO membrane structure: e.g. nature of solvent, pH of solutions and concentration of solutes.

    Hydrogen storage parameters were studied for a set of graphene related materials with broad range of surface areas (SSA) (200 - 3300 m2/g). Hydrogen sorption weight percent (wt%) is found to correlate with SSA for all studied graphene materials following the trend standard for other nanostructured carbon materials. The highest hydrogen uptakes of ~1.2 wt% at 296 K and ~7.5 wt% at 77 K were measured for graphene material with SSA of over 3000 m2/g. Addition of Pd and Pt nanoparticles to graphene materials did not resulted in improvement of hydrogen storage compared to nanoparticles-free samples. No deviation from the standard wt% vs. SSA trends was also observed for pillared GO materials. Therefore, hydrogen storage properties of graphene related materials at room temperatures are not confirmed to be exceptional. However, high surface area graphene materials are found to be among the best materials for physisorption of hydrogen at liquid nitrogen temperature. Moreover, hydrogen storage capacity of 4 wt%, comparable to target values, was observed at temperature of solid CO2 (193 K) which can be maintained using common refrigeration methods.

  • Aaboud, M.
    et al.
    Bergeås, Elin Kuutmann
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Högenergifysik.
    Bokan, Peter
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Högenergifysik.
    Brenner, Richard
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Högenergifysik.
    Ekelöf, Tord
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Högenergifysik.
    Ellert, Mattias
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Högenergifysik.
    Ferrari, Arnaud
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Högenergifysik.
    Gradin, P.O. Joakim
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Högenergifysik.
    Isacson, Max
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Högenergifysik.
    Madsen, Alexander
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Högenergifysik.
    Mårtensson, Mikael
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Högenergifysik.
    Öhman, Henrik
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Högenergifysik.
    Rangel-Smith, Camilla
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Högenergifysik.
    De Bruin, Pedro Sales
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Fysiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, Högenergifysik.
    Zwalinski, L.
    Search for Dark Matter Produced in Association with a Higgs Boson Decaying to b¯b Using 36  fb−1 of pp Collisions at √s=13  TeV with the ATLAS Detector2017Inngår i: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 119, nr 18, artikkel-id 181804Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Several extensions of the standard model predict associated production of dark-matter particles with a Higgs boson. Such processes are searched for in final states with missing transverse momentum and a Higgs boson decaying to a b¯b pair with the ATLAS detector using 36.1  fb−1 of pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV at the LHC. The observed data are in agreement with the standard model predictions and limits are placed on the associated production of dark-matter particles and a Higgs boson.

  • Disputas: 2018-03-02 13:15 Humanistiska Teatern, Uppsala
    Sköld, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för ABM.
    Documenting Videogame Communities: A Study of Community Production of Information in Social-Media Environments and its Implications for Videogame Preservation2018Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the disciplines of library and information studies and archival studies, this study seeks to explore the production of information in online videogame communities and to elucidate how such insights can offer practical and conceptual support to the knotty issue of how to preserve those sociocultural aspects of videogames that exist 'beyond' the code and audiovisual data resources of the videogame itself. This is accomplished in two principal moves: (i) by delving into the current state of socioculturally-focused videogame preservation and; (ii) by inquiring into the production of information carried out by videogame communities in what arguably is one of their most important interfaces of interaction—discussion forums, wikis, and other social-media services. The study is based on four papers (I–IV). Paper I develops the theoretical framework of the study on the basis of practice theory and document theory. Papers II and III report on field-studies of videogame-community information production in the context of two processes of importance in community social life: memory-making (II) and knowledge production (III). Paper IV offers a qualitative systematic review of videogame-archiving literature, allowing Papers I–III to be situated in an archival context. The study employs multiple methods and encompasses several empirical sites of inquiry and was inspired by the framework of exploratory research and of 'bricolage' research strategies.

    The results of the study add to the present state of knowledge on how information in the social-media environments of the large and influential present-day videogaming domain emerges as a result of community practices of production, and how videogame-community social life is entangled with information production in such spaces. The study also furthers archival inquiry on the topic of videogame preservation by providing a description and analysis of what information objects videogame-related social media plausibly hold, and by what communal practices and processes they have been brought into existence. Furthermore, the study examines the consequences of collecting community-produced social media and framing it as documentation of the sociocultural aspects of videogames—a key issue in videogames preservation.

  • Raza, Wasif
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Yrkes- och miljömedicin.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Yrkes- och miljömedicin.
    Johansson, Christer
    Nilsson Sommar, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Yrkes- och miljömedicin.
    Air pollution as a risk factor in health impact assessments of a travel mode shift towards cycling2018Inngår i: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 11, nr 1, artikkel-id 1429081Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Promotion of active commuting provides substantial health and environmental benefits by influencing air pollution, physical activity, accidents, and noise. However, studies evaluating intervention and policies on a mode shift from motorized transport to cycling have estimated health impacts with varying validity and precision.

    OBJECTIVE: To review and discuss the estimation of air pollution exposure and its impacts in health impact assessment studies of a shift in transport from cars to bicycles in order to guide future assessments.

    METHODS: A systematic database search of PubMed was done primarily for articles published from January 2000 to May 2016 according to PRISMA guidelines.

    RESULTS: We identified 18 studies of health impact assessment of change in transport mode. Most studies investigated future hypothetical scenarios of increased cycling. The impact on the general population was estimated using a comparative risk assessment approach in the majority of these studies, whereas some used previously published cost estimates. Air pollution exposure during cycling was estimated based on the ventilation rate, the pollutant concentration, and the trip duration. Most studies employed exposure-response functions from studies comparing background levels of fine particles between cities to estimate the health impacts of local traffic emissions. The effect of air pollution associated with increased cycling contributed small health benefits for the general population, and also only slightly increased risks associated with fine particle exposure among those who shifted to cycling. However, studies calculating health impacts based on exposure-response functions for ozone, black carbon or nitrogen oxides found larger effects attributed to changes in air pollution exposure.

    CONCLUSION: A large discrepancy between studies was observed due to different health impact assessment approaches, different assumptions for calculation of inhaled dose and different selection of dose-response functions. This kind of assessments would improve from more holistic approaches using more specific exposure-response functions.

  • Kostenius, Catrine
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Hälsa och rehabilitering.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Hälsa och rehabilitering.
    Lindgren, Eva
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap, Omvårdnad.
    Bykachev, Kirsi
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Karppi, Jussi
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Kumpulainen, Kirsti
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Sormunen, Marjorita
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Turunen, Outi
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Turunen, Hannele
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Thompson, Lucy
    University of Aberdeen.
    Wilson, Philip
    University of Aberdeen.
    Breivik, Elin Anne
    Norwegian Centre for e-Health Research.
    Hege Fagerheim, Siv
    Norwegian Centre for e-Health Research.
    Larsen, Frank
    Norwegian Centre for e-Health Research.
    Experiences of using eHealth to improve psychiatry services for children andadolescents in peripheral areas2017Inngår i: Ninth International Congress of Arctic Social Sciences: People and Place (ICASS IX), 2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)