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  • Sidenius, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Law.
    Disputatio juridica inauguralis de publicana et rescissoria actionibus ... sub directione... Danielis Sidenii... censuræ submittit Elias N. Mörck Sudermannus. In aud. Gust. ad diem 11. Junij horis consvetis.1642Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
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  • Sidenius, Daniel
    Uppsala University.
    De jurisprudentiæ natura, disputationem præside Daniele Nicolai Sidenio ... publicæ subjicit disqvisitioni ... Gabriel Gabrielis Oxenstierna ... in majori auditorio ad diem 22. Martij, horis à 7. matutinis. ... .1634Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
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  • Sidenius, Daniel
    Uppsala University.
    Disputatio juridica de tutela, quam ... sub praesidio ... Dn. Danielis Sidenii ... publici exercitij gratiâ proponit, Daniel Belther Upsal. ad diem [31] Martij.1634Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
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  • Malik, Anurag
    et al.
    Department of Soil and Water Conservation Engineering, College of Technology, G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263145, Uttarakhand, India.
    Rai, Priya
    Department of Soil and Water Conservation Engineering, College of Technology, G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263145, Uttarakhand, India.
    Heddam, Salim
    Faculty of Science, Agronomy Department, Hydraulics Division University, 20 Août 1955, Route EL HADAIK, 26 Skikda, BP, Algeria.
    Kisi, Ozgur
    Department of Civil Engineering, School of Technology, Ilia State University, Tbilisi 0162, Georgia.
    Sharafati, Ahmad
    Institute of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, Da Nang 550000, Vietnam. Faculty of Civil Engineering, Duy Tan University, Da Nang 550000, Vietnam. Department of Civil Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran.
    Salih, Sinan Q.
    Institute of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, Da Nang 550000, Vietnam. Computer Science Department, College of Computer Science and Information Technology, University of Anbar, Ramadi 31001, Iraq.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Yaseen, Zaher Mundher
    Sustainable Developments in Civil Engineering Research Group, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
    Pan Evaporation Estimation in Uttarakhand and Uttar Pradesh States, India: Validity of an Integrative Data Intelligence Model2020In: Atmosphere, ISSN 2073-4433, E-ISSN 2073-4433, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Appropriate input selection for the estimation matrix is essential when modeling non-linear progression. In this study, the feasibility of the Gamma test (GT) was investigated to extract the optimal input combination as the primary modeling step for estimating monthly pan evaporation (EPm). A new artificial intelligent (AI) model called the co-active neuro-fuzzy inference system (CANFIS) was developed for monthly EPm estimation at Pantnagar station (located in Uttarakhand State) and Nagina station (located in Uttar Pradesh State), India. The proposed AI model was trained and tested using different percentages of data points in scenarios one to four. The estimates yielded by the CANFIS model were validated against several well-established predictive AI (multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) and multiple linear regression (MLR)) and empirical (Penman model (PM)) models. Multiple statistical metrics (normalized root mean square error (NRMSE), Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC), Willmott index (WI), and relative error (RE)) and graphical interpretation (time variation plot, scatter plot, relative error plot, and Taylor diagram) were performed for the modeling evaluation. The results of appraisal showed that the CANFIS-1 model with six input variables provided better NRMSE (0.1364, 0.0904, 0.0947, and 0.0898), NSE (0.9439, 0.9736, 0.9703, and 0.9799), PCC (0.9790, 0.9872, 0.9877, and 0.9922), and WI (0.9860, 0.9934, 0.9927, and 0.9949) values for Pantnagar station, and NRMSE (0.1543, 0.1719, 0.2067, and 0.1356), NSE (0.9150, 0.8962, 0.8382, and 0.9453), PCC (0.9643, 0.9649, 0.9473, and 0.9762), and WI (0.9794, 0.9761, 0.9632, and 0.9853) values for Nagina stations in all applied modeling scenarios for estimating the monthly EPm. This study also confirmed the supremacy of the proposed integrated GT-CANFIS model under four different scenarios in estimating monthly EPm. The results of the current application demonstrated a reliable modeling methodology for water resource management and sustainability.

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  • Public defence: 2020-08-21 13:00 Oskar Kleins auditorium (FR4), AlbaNova universitetscentrum, Stockholm
    Calissendorff, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Characterising Emblematic Binaries at the Lowest Stellar and Substellar Masses2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stars are involved in most research fields of astronomy, ranging from studies of faraway galaxies, exploding supernovae, to more nearby exoplanets and even our own Sun. As such, it is paramount that our physical interpretation of stars is accurate. By observing stars at different epochs, we can fashion evolutionary models to predict important events that occur at different phases during their life-cycle. Thus, exemplary stars where properties including mass, age and luminosity can be observed become increasingly valuable as benchmarks for calibrating said models with. Sometimes, all of these essential properties can be measured for a single system. For instance, for a binary star which circles a common centre of mass we can from its orbital motion calculate the dynamical mass of the system. If the stellar system also has a well-determined age we may use it as a benchmark for our models, and hence refer to it as an emblematic binary system.

    In this thesis we are searching for exactly these emblematic binaries, both among lowmass stars and substellar brown dwarfs. We also show how to measure the different characteristics that make the systems into exemplary touchstones. We provide an overview over the different types of stellar binaries, how mass and age estimates are performed, as well as discuss the implications multiplicity has for the formation and evolution of stars and brown dwarfs. In Paper I we present the results from an orbital fit we constrained for a low-mass binary with a known age, making into a valuable and relatively rare benchmark. We also show in Paper II how long baseline astrometry can be exploited in order to place better constraints for orbital fits and dynamical masses for low-mass companions to stars by measuring the perturbation in proper motion over time. The dynamical masses are sequentially tested against evolutionary models, which at these low masses display several discrepancies compared to the observables, and are thus questioned. We explore more uncharted mass-regimes in Paper III, where we employ laser guide star assisted adaptive optics to search for multiplicity among faint substellar objects in young moving groups, detecting 3 new young brown dwarf binary systems. These new binaries will prove to be highly valuable systems for future research of brown dwarfs, and will be able to be studied further with for instance the Extremely Large Telescope or James Webb Space Telescope, which also makes them into prominent benchmarks for substellar evolutionary models. Furthermore, age estimation typically dominates the error budget for low-mass stars and brown dwarfs, requiring several different approaches for a robust assessment. In Paper IV we test and compare different techniques for age determination of 7 low-mass binary stars. These binaries have had their orbital motion monitored for a longer time, and will soon be constrained well enough that dynamical masses may be procured. As such, these low-mass binaries will extend the so far scarce number of exemplary systems where both mass, luminosity and age can be determined, to later be used to calibrate theoretical evolutionary models.

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  • Liu, Suhong
    et al.
    School of Mathematics and Information Science, Baoji University of Arts and Sciences, Shaanxi, China.
    Afan, Haitham Abdulmohsin
    Institute of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, Da Nang, Viet Nam.
    Aldlemy, Mohammed Suleman
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Collage of Mechanical Engineering Technology, Benghazi-Libya.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Yaseen, Zaher
    Sustainable Developments in Civil Engineering Research Group, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam.
    Energy analysis using carbon and metallic oxides-based nanomaterials inside a solar collector2020In: Energy Reports, ISSN 2050-0505, E-ISSN 2352-4847, Vol. 6, p. 1373-1381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effectiveness of a flat-plate solar collector was studied by using SiO2, Al2O3, Graphene, and graphene nanoplatelets nanofluids with distilled water as the working fluids. The energy efficiency was theoretically compared using MATLAB programming. The prepared carbon and metallic oxides nanomaterials were structurally and morphologically characterized via field emission scanning electron microscope. The study was conducted under different operating conditions such as different volume fractions (0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75% and 1%), fluid mass flow rate (0.0085, 0.017, and 0.0255 kg/s), input temperatures (30, 40, and 50 °C), and solar irradiance (500, 750, and 1000 W/m2). Nanofluids showed better thermophysical properties compared to standard working fluids. With the addition of the nanofluids SiO2, Al2O3, Gr and GNPs to the FPSC the highest efficiency of 64.45%, 67.03%, 72.45%, and 76.56% respectively was reached. The results suggested that nanofluids made from carbon nanostructures and metallic oxides can be used in solar collectors to increase the parameters of heat absorbed/loss compared to water only usage.

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  • Winton, Patrik
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Historiska institutionen.
    Edling, Max
    Uppsala universitet, Historiska institutionen.
    Ett nödvändigt ont: statsskulden som historiskt fenomen2009In: Ett nödvändigt ont: Statsskuld och politik i Förenta Staterna och Sverige 1780-1870 / [ed] Max Edling & Patrik Winton, Uppsala: Historiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet , 2009, p. 9-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • Vinje, Vegard
    et al.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Mardal, Kent-Andre
    Rognes, Marie E.
    Stoverud, Karen-Helene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Intracranial pressure elevation alters CSF clearance pathways2020In: Fluids and Barriers of the CNS, ISSN 2045-8118, E-ISSN 2045-8118, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Infusion testing is a common procedure to determine whether shunting will be beneficial in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus. The method has a well-developed theoretical foundation and corresponding mathematical models that describe the CSF circulation from the choroid plexus to the arachnoid granulations. Here, we investigate to what extent the proposed glymphatic or paravascular pathway (or similar pathways) modifies the results of the traditional mathematical models.

    Methods: We used a compartment model to estimate pressure in the subarachnoid space and the paravascular spaces. For the arachnoid granulations, the cribriform plate and the glymphatic circulation, resistances were calculated and used to estimate pressure and flow before and during an infusion test. Finally, different variations to the model were tested to evaluate the sensitivity of selected parameters.

    Results: At baseline intracranial pressure (ICP), we found a very small paravascular flow directed into the subarachnoid space, while 60% of the fluid left through the arachnoid granulations and 40% left through the cribriform plate. However, during the infusion, 80% of the fluid left through the arachnoid granulations, 20% through the cribriform plate and flow in the PVS was stagnant. Resistance through the glymphatic system was computed to be 2.73 mmHg/(mL/min), considerably lower than other fluid pathways, giving non-realistic ICP during infusion if combined with a lymphatic drainage route.

    Conclusions: The relative distribution of CSF flow to different clearance pathways depends on ICP, with the arachnoid granulations as the main contributor to outflow. As such, ICP increase is an important factor that should be addressed when determining the pathways of injected substances in the subarachnoid space. Our results suggest that the glymphatic resistance is too high to allow for pressure driven flow by arterial pulsations and at the same time too small to allow for a direct drainage route from PVS to cervical lymphatics.

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  • Languilaire, Jean-Charles
    JCL Humanistic Consulting, Skurup, Sweden.
    Businesses in Rwanda: Sustainable entrepreneurship, marketing and management for sustainability2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cooperation between the Jönköping International Business School (JIBS) at Jönköping University and the College of Business and Economics (CBE) at the University of Rwanda started in 2014 as part of the UR-Sweden Programme of Research, Higher Education and Institutional Advancement. In 2016, a decision was taken to further improve the quality of teaching by developing new and contextualized teaching material. This task was undertaken in the frame of the cooperation by supporting CBE staff to write these cases studies under the guidance and mentorship of JIBS professors in general and Assistant Professor Jean-Charles E. Languilaire in particular. JIBS and CBE proudly present the first case studies in the frame of this cooperation. This book entitled ”Businesses in Rwanda: Sustainable Entrepreneurship, Marketing and Management for Sustainability” includes 8 cases about 5 different Rwandese businesses: BEMS Duhange Ltd., SOWATORM Ltd., NYINAWAJAMBO, INEMA Catering Services and the Gorillas Hotel Group.

    This book presents five entrepreneurial journeys as well as the managerial and marketing struggles along these journeys. Specifically, the cases describe how entrepreneurs found or created a gap in the market and then developed and managed their organizations to enter such markets and took a place in them by gaining market shares and as a result to contribute to economical, environmental and social sustainability. This book presents sustainable entrepreneurship, sustainable management and sustainable marketing as cornerstones to sustainability in the context of Rwanda. Across the cases, students will have the occasion to increase their capacity to reflect on entrepreneurship, marketing and management and the relationships between them. These cases will enable students to develop a multifaceted mind-set for sustainability, to increase their capacity to create and develop new businesses, and to prepare themselves for their future roles as employees, managers and leaders in a sustainable world.

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  • Sjövägen nr 4 20202020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Färjerederiets

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  • Public defence: 2020-06-12 10:00 U1, Stockholm
    Tang, Jiexiong
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Deep Learning Assisted Visual Odometry2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The capabilities to autonomously explore and interact with the environmenthas always been a greatly demanded capability for robots. Varioussensor based SLAM methods were investigated and served for this purposein the past decades. Vision intuitively provides 3D understanding of the surroundingand contains a vast amount of information that require high levelintelligence to interpret. Sensors like LIDAR, returns the range measurementdirectly. The motion estimation and scene reconstruction using camera is aharder problem. In this thesis, we are in particular interested in the trackingfrond-end of vision based SLAM, i.e. Visual Odometry (VO), with afocus on deep learning approaches. Recently, learning based methods havedominated most of the vision applications and gradually appears in our dailylife and real-world applications. Different to classical methods, deep learningbased methods can potentially tackle some of the intrinsic problems inmulti-view geometry and straightforwardly improve the performance of crucialprocedures of VO. For example, the correspondences estimation, densereconstruction and semantic representation.

    In this work, we propose novel learning schemes for assisting both directand in-direct visual odometry methods. For the direct approaches, weinvestigate mainly the monocular setup. The lack of the baseline that providesscale as in stereo has been one of the well-known intrinsic problems inthis case. We propose a coupled single view depth and normal estimationmethod to reduce the scale drift and address the issue of lacking observationsof the absolute scale. It is achieved by providing priors for the depthoptimization. Moreover, we utilize higher-order geometrical information toguide the dense reconstruction in a sparse-to-dense manner. For the in-directmethods, we propose novel feature learning based methods which noticeablyimprove the feature matching performance in comparison with common classicalfeature detectors and descriptors. Finally, we discuss potential ways tomake the training self-supervised. This is accomplished by incorporating thedifferential motion estimation into the training while performing multi-viewadaptation to maximize the repeatability and matching performance. We alsoinvestigate using a different type of supervisory signal for the training. Weadd a higher-level proxy task and show that it is possible to train a featureextraction network even without the explicit loss for it.

    In summary, this thesis presents successful examples of incorporating deeplearning techniques to assist a classical visual odometry system. The resultsare promising and have been extensively evaluated on challenging benchmarks,real robot and handheld cameras. The problem we investigate is stillin an early stage, but is attracting more and more interest from researcher inrelated fields.

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  • Hult, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Mathematical Statistics.
    Favero, Martina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Mathematical Statistics.
    Estimates of the proportino of SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals in SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a Bayesian SEIR model is studied to estimate the

    proportion of the population infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsi-

    ble for COVID-19. To capture heterogeneity in the population and the eect

    of interventions to reduce the rate of epidemic spread, the model uses a time-

    varying contact rate, whose logarithm has a Gaussian process prior. A Poisson

    point process is used to model the occurrence of deaths due to COVID-19 and

    the model is calibrated using data of daily death counts in combination with

    a snapshot of the the proportion of individuals with an active infection, per-

    formed in Stockholm in late March. The methodology is applied to regions in

    Sweden. The results show that the estimated proportion of the population who

    has been infected is around 13:5% in Stockholm, by 2020-05-15, and ranges be-

    tween 2.5%-15.6% in the other investigated regions. In Stockholm where the

    peak of daily death counts is likely behind us, parameter uncertainty does not

    heavily inuence the expected daily number of deaths, nor the expected cumu-

    lative number of deaths. It does, however, impact the estimated cumulative

    number of infected individuals. In the other regions, where random sampling

    of the number of active infections is not available, parameter sharing is used

    to improve estimates, but the parameter uncertainty remains substantial.

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  • Eklöf, Vincy
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lundgren, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Wikberg, Maria L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Edin, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Löfgren Burström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Rutegård, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    The Combined Value of Faecal Haemoglobin andCalprotectin in Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer inSymptomatic Patients Referred to Colonoscopy2019In: Academic Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology (AJGH), Vol. 1, no 3, p. 1-7Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate the diagnostic value of a combined analyses of faecal immunological haemoglobin (FIT) and faecal calprotectin (FC) in detection of colorectal cancer (CRC).

    Methods: Out-patients (n=1440) referred to the endoscopy unit were analysed for FIT and FC in stool samples collected before the colonoscopy bowel preparation. The samples were collected from one defecation by the patients at home. Patients with IBD were excluded leaving stool samples from 1133 patients for further analyses. FIT was analysed using the immunological Analyse F.O.B Test and FC was analysed using the CALPRO® Calprotectin Elisa Test. Sensitivity and specificity to detect CRC was calculated for the individual tests, as well as for combined FIT/FC tests.

    Results: Out of the included patients, 38 were diagnosed with CRC, 9 with high grade dysplasia (HGD), and 133 with low grade dysplasia (LGD). FIT was analysed in 673 (59.4%), FC in 1021 (90.1%) and both FIT and FC in 561 (49.5%) patients. A ROC curve analysis showed that the most accurate cut-off level for FC in detecting CRC in our study was 105.5 µg/g. The sensitivity for CRC when using FIT, FC (cut-off > 100 µg/g) and the combination of FIT and FC (at least one positive test) was 65.5%, 74.1% and 94.4%, respectively. The corresponding specificity was 84.8%, 74.9% and 68.3%, respectively.

    Conclusion: Combined analyses of FIT and FC improved sensitivity for detection of CRC. Further studies in larger cohorts are required to find the optimal cut-off levels for different combinations of tests.

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  • Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Dahlblom, Kjerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Children's perspectives on health promoting living environmens: the significance of social capital2020In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the usefulness of social capital as a conceptual tool to design neighbourhoods promoting children’s health. The aim was to explore children’s perspectives of health promoting environments, and we used a combination of photovoice and grounded theory. Children from two neighbourhoods in a Swedish municipality were invited to photograph and discuss places of importance for their well-being. They presented places facilitating togetherness, enjoyable activities and positive emotions, mostly found in their immediate environments: at home, at school and in their neighbourhoods, but the access to these places was unequally distributed between the areas. The results highlight a need for ensuring all children’s access to health promoting places and to include children’s views in policy and planning. Investments in the physical environment need to be combined with efforts to influence norms and collective efficacy to secure local ownership and use of these investments. We found that the concept of social capital is a relevant conceptual tool for understanding what constitutes health-promoting places from children’s perspectives and contributes to a deeper understanding on how physical and social environments are interlinked.

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  • Vega, Daniel Movilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Housing and Revolution: From the Dom-Kommuna to the Transitional Type of Experimental House (1926-30)2020In: Architectural Histories, E-ISSN 2050-5833, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the USSR, against the backdrop of political change and social instability in the 1920s, the issue of housing for the masses was addressed by the Association of Contemporary Architects (OSA), under the leadership of Moisey Ginzburg. Their mission was not only to provide a solution to the lack of accommodation in the major cities of the country, but to redefine housing as a framework suited to a society transitioning towards a fully socialised life. The response was developed in three stages of design research, over a period of five years. The initial conceptual phase was formally presented by members of the OSA at the 1926 Comradely Competition, and focused on the housing question, with specific designs for communal houses. The second stage revolved around the scientific and methodological research of the Stroykom, developed in parallel with the designs for the new communal living units. The final stage took material form in six specific buildings, known as transitional-type experimental houses. One of these, the Narkomfin, gained worldwide recognition as a modern prototype of Soviet avant-garde housing, and has been widely researched as a result. However, to date no study has approached all three phases with equal scrutiny and methodology. This article offers a detailed account of the OSA's experimental design strategies for collective workers' housing between 1926 and 1930 under Ginzburg's leadership by examining original sources, as well as analysing and restoring the individual projects at each stage. It provides a new interpretation of the famous Narkomfin House and ideas on the first Soviet avant-garde housing project by reconstructing the complex research context in which the building, in tandem with other projects, was developed.

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  • Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    Friman, Eva
    Mogren, Anna
    Palmer, Henrietta
    Sund, Per
    Carstedt, Göran
    Lundberg, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Robertsson, Barbro
    Rodhe, Håkan
    Svärd, Linn
    Evaluation of integration of sustainable development in higher education in Sweden2020In: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, ISSN 1467-6370, E-ISSN 1758-6739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Since 2006, higher education institutions (HEIs) in Sweden, should according to the Higher Education Act, promote sustainable development (SD). In 2016, the Swedish Government asked the Swedish higher education authority to evaluate how this study is proceeding. The authority chose to focus on education. This paper aims to produce a report on this evaluation.

    Design/methodology/approach: All 47 HEIs in Sweden were asked to write a self-evaluation report based on certain evaluation criteria. A panel was appointed consisting of academics and representatives for students and working life. The panel wrote an evaluation of each HEI, a report on general findings and recommendations, and gave an overall judgement of each HEI in two classes as follows: the HEI has well-developed processes for integration of SD in education or the HEI needs to develop their processes.

    Findings: Overall, a mixed picture developed. Most HEIs could give examples of programmes or courses where SD was integrated. However, less than half of the HEIs had overarching goals for integration of SD in education or had a systematic follow-up of these goals. Even fewer worked specifically with pedagogy and didactics, teaching and learning methods and environments, sustainability competences or other characters of education for SD. Overall, only 12 out of 47 got a higher judgement.

    Originality/value: This is a unique study in which all HEIs in a country are evaluated. This provides unique possibilities for identifying success factors and barriers. The importance of the leadership of the HEIs became clear.

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  • Åkerlund, Andreas
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    Regeringsstyrning av svensk offentlig diplomati: Om Svenska institutets myndighetsinstruktioner och regleringsbrev 1998–20182020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport behandlar förändringar och förskjutningar i regeringens styrning av Svenska institutet under perioden 1998–2018.

    Rapporten behandlar tre frågekomplex. Det första handlar om styrningens form, där utvecklingen sätts i relation till allmänna förändringar i svensk myndighetsstyrning under perioden. Det andra handlar om innehållet i myndighetsinstruktioner och regleringsbrev utifrån antagandet att detta är en indikator för hur offentlig diplomati förståtts och omsatts av svenska regeringar under perioden. Utifrån dessa två komplex diskuteras sedan balansen mellan regeringspolitik och Svenska institutets bredare representations- och främjandeuppdrag, det vill säga graden och karaktären hos regeringens styrning av institutet över tid.

    Andreas Åkerlund är docent i historia och verksam vid Södertörns högskola.

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    Regeringsstyrning av svensk offentlig diplomati: Om Svenska institutets myndighetsinstruktioner och regleringsbrev 1998–2018
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  • Wang, Yi-Ming
    et al.
    Yang, Qi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. State Key Laboratory of Tree Genetics and Breeding, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing, China.
    Xu, Hui
    Liu, Yan-Jing
    Yang, Hai-Ling
    Physiological and transcriptomic analysis provide novel insight into cobalt stress responses in willow2020In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 2308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential component of several enzymes and coenzymes in living organisms. Excess Co is highly toxic to plants. The knowledge of molecular response mechanisms to cobalt stress in plants is still limited, especially in woody plants. The responses of weeping willow (Salix babylonica) seedlings to Co stress were studied using morphological and physiochemical measurements and RNA-seq analysis. The physiological and biochemical indexes such as growth rate, the content of chlorophyll and soluble sugar, photosynthesis and peroxidase activity were all changed in willow seedlings under Co stress. The metal ion concentrations in willow including Cu, Zn and Mg were disturbed due to excess Co. Of 2002 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 1165 were root-specific DEGs and 837 were stem and leaf-specific DEGs. Further analysis of DEGs showed there were multiple complex cascades in the response network at the transcriptome level under Co stress. Detailed elucidation of responses to oxidative stress, phytohormone signaling-related genes and transcription factors (TFs), and detoxification of excess cellular Co ion indicated the various defense mechanisms in plants respond to cobalt stress. Our findings provide new and comprehensive insights into the plant tolerance to excess Co stress.

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  • Naidu, Veluru Ramesh
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences. Stockholm University.
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences. Stockholm University.
    Synthesis of Cross-Conjugated Polyenes via Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative C-C Bond Forming Cascade Reactions of Allenes2020In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 85, no 8, p. 5428-5437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient palladium-catalyzed oxidative C-C bond forming cascade reaction of allenes involving a coupling between an enallene and an allenyne followed by a carbocyclization of the generated Pd-intermediate was developed. This cascade reaction afforded functionalized cross-conjugated polyenes. The enallene is initially activated by palladium and reacts with the allenyne to give the cross-conjugated polyenes. 

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  • Hauksson-Tresch, Nathalie
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, French.
    Visual Rhetoric of the Truth in the Dreyfus Affair: A Semiotic Approach.2019In: International Journal for the Semiotics of Law, ISSN 0952-8059, E-ISSN 1572-8722Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • Hansson, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Bell’s theorem and its tests: Proof that nature is superdeterministic—Not random2020In: Physics essays, ISSN 0836-1398, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 216-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By analyzing the same Bell experiment in different reference frames, we show that nature at its fundamental level is superdeterministic, not random, in contrast to what is indicated by orthodox quantum mechanics. Events—including the results of quantum mechanical measurements—in global space-time are fixed prior to measurement.

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  • Okwori, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Viklander, Maria
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Hedström, Annelie
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.
    Performance assessment of Swedish sewer pipe networks using pipe blockage and other associated performance indicators2020In: H2Open Journal, E-ISSN 2616-6518, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 46-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sewer pipe networks are expected to operate with minimal or no interruptions. The complex nature of randomlyoccurring failures in sewer networks arising from blockages significantly adds to the cost of operation and maintenance.Blockages are significant due to sewage backup or basements flooding, resulting from theiroccurrence. Therefore, continuous performance assessment of sewer pipe networks is necessary to ensurerequired levels of service at an acceptable cost. This study provides insight into the performance of the sewerpipe networks by assessing the proneness of the network to blockages. Furthermore it draws inferences at a holisticstrategic level of influential explanatory factors of blockage proneness, using data available in the SwedishWater and Wastewater Association’s benchmarking system. Results indicate that medium sized municipalitiesare prone to at least 30% more blockages per km per year compared to other municipalities. A hypothesis ofexplanatory factors includes reduced flow volumes and flow depth. Flow velocities below self-cleaning velocityin sewer pipe networks, encouraged by sluggishness of flow are responsible for increased possibility for sedimentdeposition and accumulation in sewers leading to blockages. This is also exacerbated by the deposition of nondisposables(wet wipes, baby diapers, hard paper, etc.), accumulation of fats, oils and grease in sewers andincreased water conservation measures.

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  • Aad, G.
    et al.
    Aix Marseille Univ, IN2P3, CNRS, CPPM, Marseille, France.
    Asimakopoulou, Eleni M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bergeås Kuutmann, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bokan, Petar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics. Georg August Univ Gottingen, Phys Inst 2, Gottingen, Germany.
    Brenner, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ekelöf, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellajosyula, Venugopal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellert, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ferrari, Arnaud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Isacson, Max
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Mårtensson, Mikael U. F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Zwalinski, L.
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Measurement of isolated-photon plus two-jet production in pp collisions at √s=13 TeV with the ATLAS detector2020In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 3, article id 179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamics of isolated-photon plus two-jet production in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are studied with the ATLAS detector at the LHC using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36.1 fb(-1). Cross sections are measured as functions of a variety of observables, including angular correlations and invariant masses of the objects in the final state, gamma + jet + jet. Measurements are also performed in phase-space regions enriched in each of the two underlying physical mechanisms, namely direct and fragmentation processes. The measurements cover the range of photon (jet) transverse momenta from 150 GeV (100 GeV) to 2 TeV. The tree-level plus parton-shower predictions from Sherpa and Pythia as well as the next-to-leading-order QCD predictions from Sherpa are compared with the measurements. The next-to-leading-order QCD predictions describe the data adequately in shape and normalisation except for regions of phase space such as those with high values of the invariant mass or rapidity separation of the two jets, where the predictions overestimate the data.

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  • Aad, G.
    et al.
    Aix Marseille Univ, IN2P3, CNRS, CPPM, Marseille, France.
    Asimakopoulou, Eleni M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bergeås Kuutmann, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bokan, Petar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics. Georg August Univ Gottingen, Phys Inst 2, Gottingen, Germany.
    Brenner, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ekelöf, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellajosyula, Venugopal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellert, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ferrari, Arnaud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Isacson, Max
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Mårtensson, Mikael U. F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Sales De Bruin, Pedro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Zwalinski, L.
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Search for chargino-neutralino production with mass splittings near the electroweak scale in three-lepton final states in √s=13 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector2020In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 101, no 7, article id 072001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A search for supersymmetry through the pair production of electroweakinos with mass splittings near the electroweak scale and decaying via on-shell W and Z bosons is presented for a three-lepton final state. The analyzed proton-proton collision data taken at a center-of-mass energy of root s = 13 TeV were collected between 2015 and 2018 by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 139 fb(-1). A search, emulating the recursive jigsaw reconstruction technique with easily reproducible laboratory-frame variables, is performed. The two excesses observed in the 2015-2016 data recursive jigsaw analysis in the low-mass three-lepton phase space are reproduced. Results with the full data set are in agreement with the Standard Model expectations. They are interpreted to set exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level on simplified models of chargino-neutralino pair production for masses up to 345 GeV.

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  • Lavers, David A.
    et al.
    European Ctr Medium Range Weather Forecasts ECMWF, Shinfield Pk, Reading RG2 9AX, Berks, England..
    Ramos, Maria-Helena
    Univ Paris Saclay, INRAE, UR HYCAR, F-92761 Antony, France..
    Magnusson, Linus
    European Ctr Medium Range Weather Forecasts ECMWF, Shinfield Pk, Reading RG2 9AX, Berks, England..
    Pechlivanidis, Ilias
    Swedish Meteorol & Hydrol Inst, SE-60176 Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Klein, Bastian
    Fed Inst Hydrol BfG, Dept M2 Water Balance Forecasting & Predict, Mainzer Tor 1, D-56068 Koblenz, Germany..
    Prudhomme, Christel
    European Ctr Medium Range Weather Forecasts ECMWF, Shinfield Pk, Reading RG2 9AX, Berks, England.;Ctr Ecol & Hydrol, Wallingford OX10 8BB, Oxon, England.;Loughborough Univ, Geog Dept, Loughborough LE11 3TU, Leics, England..
    Arnal, Louise
    European Ctr Medium Range Weather Forecasts ECMWF, Shinfield Pk, Reading RG2 9AX, Berks, England.;Univ Reading, Dept Geog & Environm Sci, Reading RG6 6AB, Berks, England..
    Crochemore, Louise
    Swedish Meteorol & Hydrol Inst, SE-60176 Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Van Den Hurk, Bart
    Deltares, NL-2629 HV Delft, Netherlands..
    Weerts, Albrecht H.
    Deltares, NL-2629 HV Delft, Netherlands.;Wageningen Univ & Res, Hydrol & Quantitat Water Management Grp, POB 47, NL-6700 AA Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Harrigan, Shaun
    European Ctr Medium Range Weather Forecasts ECMWF, Shinfield Pk, Reading RG2 9AX, Berks, England..
    Cloke, Hannah L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Univ Reading, Dept Geog & Environm Sci, Reading RG6 6AB, Berks, England.;Univ Reading, Dept Meteorol, Reading RG6 6UR, Berks, England;CNDS, Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci, SE-75105 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Richardson, David S.
    European Ctr Medium Range Weather Forecasts ECMWF, Shinfield Pk, Reading RG2 9AX, Berks, England..
    Pappenberger, Florian
    European Ctr Medium Range Weather Forecasts ECMWF, Shinfield Pk, Reading RG2 9AX, Berks, England..
    A Vision for Hydrological Prediction2020In: Atmosphere, ISSN 2073-4433, E-ISSN 2073-4433, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMproving PRedictions and management of hydrological EXtremes (IMPREX) was a European Union Horizon 2020 project that ran from September 2015 to September 2019. IMPREX aimed to improve society's ability to anticipate and respond to future extreme hydrological events in Europe across a variety of uses in the water-related sectors (flood forecasting, drought risk assessment, agriculture, navigation, hydropower and water supply utilities). Through the engagement with stakeholders and continuous feedback between model outputs and water applications, progress was achieved in better understanding the way hydrological predictions can be useful to (and operationally incorporated into) problem-solving in the water sector. The work and discussions carried out during the project nurtured further reflections toward a common vision for hydrological prediction. In this article, we summarized the main findings of the IMPREX project within a broader overview of hydrological prediction, providing a vision for improving such predictions. In so doing, we first presented a synopsis of hydrological and weather forecasting, with a focus on medium-range to seasonal scales of prediction for increased preparedness. Second, the lessons learned from IMPREX were discussed. The key findings were the gaps highlighted in the global observing system of the hydrological cycle, the degree of accuracy of hydrological models and the techniques of post-processing to correct biases, the origin of seasonal hydrological skill in Europe and user requirements of hydrometeorological forecasts to ensure their appropriate use in decision-making models and practices. Last, a vision for how to improve these forecast systems/products in the future was expounded, including advancing numerical weather and hydrological models, improved earth monitoring and more frequent interaction between forecasters and users to tailor the forecasts to applications. We conclude that if these improvements can be implemented in the coming years, earth system and hydrological modelling will become more skillful, thus leading to socioeconomic benefits for the citizens of Europe and beyond.

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  • Fu, Xi
    et al.
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Occupat & Environm Hlth, Guangzhou, Peoples R China.;South China Agr Univ, Coll Life Sci, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Prot Funct & Regulat Agr O, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Norbäck, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Yuan, Qianqian
    South China Agr Univ, Coll Life Sci, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Prot Funct & Regulat Agr O, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China.;South China Agr Univ, Minist Agr & Rural Affairs, Key Lab Zoonosis, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China.;South China Agr Univ, Guangdong Lab Lingnan Modern Agr, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Li, Yanling
    South China Agr Univ, Coll Life Sci, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Prot Funct & Regulat Agr O, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China.;South China Agr Univ, Minist Agr & Rural Affairs, Key Lab Zoonosis, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China.;South China Agr Univ, Guangdong Lab Lingnan Modern Agr, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Zhu, Xunhua
    South China Agr Univ, Coll Life Sci, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Prot Funct & Regulat Agr O, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China.;South China Agr Univ, Minist Agr & Rural Affairs, Key Lab Zoonosis, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China.;South China Agr Univ, Guangdong Lab Lingnan Modern Agr, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Hashim, Jamal Hisham
    United Nations Univ, Int Inst Global Hlth, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.;Natl Univ Malaysia, Dept Community Hlth, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia..
    Hashim, Zailina
    Univ Putra Malaysia, Dept Environm & Occupat Hlth, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia..
    Ali, Faridah
    Johor State Hlth Dept, Primary Care Unit, Johor Baharu, Malaysia..
    Zheng, Yi-Wu
    ALK Abello AS, Asia Pacific Res, Guangzhou, Peoples R China..
    Lai, Xu-Xin
    ALK Abello AS, Asia Pacific Res, Guangzhou, Peoples R China..
    Spangfort, Michael Dho
    ALK Abello AS, Asia Pacific Res, Guangzhou, Peoples R China..
    Deng, Yiqun
    South China Agr Univ, Coll Life Sci, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Prot Funct & Regulat Agr O, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China.;South China Agr Univ, Minist Agr & Rural Affairs, Key Lab Zoonosis, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China.;South China Agr Univ, Guangdong Lab Lingnan Modern Agr, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Yu
    South China Agr Univ, Coll Life Sci, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Prot Funct & Regulat Agr O, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China.;South China Agr Univ, Minist Agr & Rural Affairs, Key Lab Zoonosis, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China.;South China Agr Univ, Guangdong Lab Lingnan Modern Agr, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Indoor microbiome, environmental characteristics and asthma among junior high school students in Johor Bahru, Malaysia2020In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 138, article id 105664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Indoor microbial diversity and composition are suggested to affect the prevalence and severity of asthma by previous home microbiome studies, but no microbiome-health association study has been conducted in a school environment, especially in tropical countries. In this study, we collected floor dust and environmental characteristics from 21 classrooms, and health data related to asthma symptoms from 309 students, in junior high schools in Johor Bahru, Malaysia. The bacterial and fungal composition was characterized by sequencing 16s rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, and the absolute microbial concentration was quantified by qPCR. In total, 326 bacterial and 255 fungal genera were characterized. Five bacterial (Sphingobium, Rhodomicrobium, Shimwellia, Solirubrobacter, Pleurocapsa) and two fungal (Torulaspora and Leptosphaeriaceae) taxa were protective for asthma severity. Two bacterial taxa, Izhakiella and Robinsoniella, were positively associated with asthma severity. Several protective bacterial taxa including Rhodomicrobium, Shimwellia and Sphingobium have been reported as protective microbes in previous studies, whereas other taxa were first time reported. Environmental characteristics, such as age of building, size of textile curtain per room volume, occurrence of cockroaches, concentration of house dust mite allergens transferred from homes by the occupants, were involved in shaping the overall microbial community but not asthma-associated taxa; whereas visible dampness and mold, which did not change the overall microbial community for floor dust, was negatively associated with the concentration of protective bacteria Rhodomicrobium (beta =-2.86, p = 0.021) of asthma. The result indicates complex interactions between microbes, environmental characteristics and asthma symptoms. Overall, this is the first indoor microbiome study to characterize the asthma-associated microbes and their environmental determinant in the tropical area, promoting the understanding of microbial exposure and respiratory health in this region.

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  • Ma, Jin-Ze
    et al.
    Northeast Normal Univ, Sch Geog Sci, Minist Educ, Key Lab Geog Proc & Ecol Secur Changbai Mt, Changchun, Peoples R China.;Gannan Normal Univ, Res Ctr Environm Engn & Technol, Sch Geog & Environm Engn, Ganzhou, Peoples R China.;Northeast Normal Univ, Inst Peat & Mire Res, State Environm Protect Key Lab Wetland Ecol & Veg, Changchun, Peoples R China.;Jilin Prov Key Lab Wetland Ecol Proc & Environm C, Changchun, Peoples R China..
    Chen, Xu
    China Univ Geosci, Sch Earth Sci, State Key Lab Biogeol & Environm Geol, Wuhan, Peoples R China..
    Mallik, Azim U.
    Northeast Normal Univ, Sch Geog Sci, Minist Educ, Key Lab Geog Proc & Ecol Secur Changbai Mt, Changchun, Peoples R China.;Lakehead Univ, Dept Biol, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada..
    Bu, Zhao-Jun
    Northeast Normal Univ, Sch Geog Sci, Minist Educ, Key Lab Geog Proc & Ecol Secur Changbai Mt, Changchun, Peoples R China.;Northeast Normal Univ, Inst Peat & Mire Res, State Environm Protect Key Lab Wetland Ecol & Veg, Changchun, Peoples R China.;Jilin Prov Key Lab Wetland Ecol Proc & Environm C, Changchun, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Ming-Ming
    Northeast Normal Univ, Sch Geog Sci, Minist Educ, Key Lab Geog Proc & Ecol Secur Changbai Mt, Changchun, Peoples R China.;Northeast Normal Univ, Inst Peat & Mire Res, State Environm Protect Key Lab Wetland Ecol & Veg, Changchun, Peoples R China.;Jilin Prov Key Lab Wetland Ecol Proc & Environm C, Changchun, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Sheng-Zhong
    Northeast Normal Univ, Sch Geog Sci, Minist Educ, Key Lab Geog Proc & Ecol Secur Changbai Mt, Changchun, Peoples R China.;Northeast Normal Univ, Inst Peat & Mire Res, State Environm Protect Key Lab Wetland Ecol & Veg, Changchun, Peoples R China.;Jilin Prov Key Lab Wetland Ecol Proc & Environm C, Changchun, Peoples R China..
    Sundberg, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Environmental Together With Interspecific Interactions Determine Bryophyte Distribution in a Protected Mire of Northeast China2020In: Frontiers in Earth Science, ISSN 2296-6463, Vol. 8, article id 32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Question: What environmental variables and plant–plant interactions affect mire bryophyte distribution and does the surrounding landscape with human disturbance play a role in the mire bryophyte distribution?

    Location: Jinchuan mire, Northeast China.

    Methods: We studied the spatial distribution of bryophytes in 100 1 × 1 m quadrats in the mire. Spatial variables were simulated by analysis of the distance-based Moran’s eigenvector maps (dbMEM). Variation partitioning analysis was used to reveal the relative contribution of spatial and environmental variables to bryophytes. The relationship between environmental variables and bryophytes was tested by redundancy analysis (RDA). We used co-occurrence and niche overlap models to detect interactions among bryophytes. We also studied the influence of the surrounding landscape on the distribution of bryophytes in relation to water chemistry.

    Results: The eight bryophytes occupying part of the mire had both a general distribution trend and a local spatial structure. Over 40% of the total variation in cover among bryophytes could be explained by spatial and environmental variables. In this fraction, the environmental variables explained 29.7% of the variation, of which only 4.5% was not spatially structured. RDA showed the contribution of dwarf shrub cover (SC), Na, and P to the bryophyte distribution was relatively large. Concentration of Na and SC decreased gradually from north to south, and contributed most to the variation in species composition along the first axis. The concentrations of P decreased from east to west, and contributed along the second axis. All the bryophyte species were spatially isolated but with large niche overlaps, indicating that the bryophyte community was structured by interspecific competition.

    Conclusion: Sodium mainly originating from the volcanic hill and P from the paddy fields were the main environmental factors affecting the bryophyte distribution. Concentrations of Na and P showed spatial structure, and resulted in induced spatial dependence (ISD) playing a major role in the spatial structure of the bryophyte community. Dwarf shrubs affected by nutrient distribution in the mire significantly influenced the bryophyte distribution in the mire. We conclude that the surrounding ecosystems had important influence on bryophyte distribution via nutrient influx. Furthermore, competitive interactions exacerbated the spatial separation of bryophytes.

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  • Raehtz, Kevin D.
    et al.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Med, Div Infect Dis, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA..
    Barrenäs, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics. Univ Washington, Dept Microbiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Xu, Cuiling
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Med, Div Infect Dis, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.;Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Pathol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA..
    Busman-Sahay, Kathleen
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Vaccine & Gene Therapy Inst, Portland, OR 97201 USA.;Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Oregon Natl Primate Res Ctr, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Valentine, Audrey
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Med, Div Infect Dis, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA..
    Law, Lynn
    Univ Washington, Dept Immunol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Ctr Innate Immun & Immune Dis, Washington, DC USA..
    Ma, Dongzhu
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Orthoped Surg, Pittsburgh, PA USA..
    Policicchio, Benjamin B.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Infect Dis & Microbiol, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 USA..
    Wijewardana, Viskam
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Pathol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.;IAEA Labs Seibersdorf, Seibersdorf, Austria..
    Brocca-Cofano, Egidio
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Pathol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.;UPMC, BlueSphere Bio, Pittsburgh, PA USA..
    Trichel, Anita
    Univ Pittsburgh, Sch Med, Div Lab Anim Resources, Pittsburgh, PA USA..
    Gale, Michael, Jr.
    Univ Washington, Dept Immunol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Ctr Innate Immun & Immune Dis, Washington, DC USA.;Univ Washington, Washington Natl Primate Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Keele, Brandon F.
    Frederick Natl Lab Canc Res, AIDS & Canc Virus Program, Frederick, MD USA..
    Estes, Jacob D.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Vaccine & Gene Therapy Inst, Portland, OR 97201 USA.;Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Oregon Natl Primate Res Ctr, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Apetrei, Cristian
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Med, Div Infect Dis, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.;Univ Pittsburgh, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Infect Dis & Microbiol, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 USA..
    Pandrea, Ivona
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Pathol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.;Univ Pittsburgh, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Infect Dis & Microbiol, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 USA..
    African green monkeys avoid SIV disease progression by preventing intestinal dysfunction and maintaining mucosal barrier integrity2020In: PLoS Pathogens, ISSN 1553-7366, E-ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 16, no 3, article id e1008333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    African nonhuman primates that are natural hosts to SIVs can provide us with unique insight into the pathogenesis of HIV disease due to their remarkable ability to avoid progression to AIDS, despite high levels of viral replication. A key question of SIV pathogenesis in natural hosts is whether the lack of disease progression is due to an exquisite ability to repair lesions occurring during the acute infection or to completely maintain the integrity of the mucosal barrier throughout the SIV infection. In pathogenic HIV/SIV infections of humans and macaques, the mucosal integrity is compromised during acute infection, leading to leakage of gut microbial byproducts and to the occurrence of chronic local and systemic inflammation, which plays a crucial role in driving progression to AIDS. Our study shows that the mucosal barrier integrity is never lost in African green monkeys, thereby avoiding the effects of chronic inflammation and disease progression. Unlike HIV infection, SIV infection is generally nonpathogenic in natural hosts, such as African green monkeys (AGMs), despite life-long high viral replication. Lack of disease progression was reportedly based on the ability of SIV-infected AGMs to prevent gut dysfunction, avoiding microbial translocation and the associated systemic immune activation and chronic inflammation. Yet, the maintenance of gut integrity has never been documented, and the mechanism(s) by which gut integrity is preserved are unknown. We sought to investigate the early events of SIV infection in AGMs, specifically examining the impact of SIVsab infection on the gut mucosa. Twenty-nine adult male AGMs were intrarectally infected with SIVsab92018 and serially sacrificed at well-defined stages of SIV infection, preramp-up (1-3 days post-infection (dpi)), ramp-up (4-6 dpi), peak viremia (9-12 dpi), and early chronic SIV infection (46-55 dpi), to assess the levels of immune activation, apoptosis, epithelial damage and microbial translocation in the GI tract and peripheral lymph nodes. Tissue viral loads, plasma cytokines and plasma markers of gut dysfunction were also measured throughout the course of early infection. While a strong, but transient, interferon-based inflammatory response was observed, the levels of plasma markers linked to enteropathy did not increase. Accordingly, no significant increases in apoptosis of either mucosal enterocytes or lymphocytes, and no damage to the mucosal epithelium were documented during early SIVsab infection of AGMs. These findings were supported by RNAseq of the gut tissue, which found no significant alterations in gene expression that would indicate microbial translocation. Thus, for the first time, we confirmed that gut epithelial integrity is preserved, with no evidence of microbial translocation, in AGMs throughout early SIVsab infection. This might protect AGMs from developing intestinal dysfunction and the subsequent chronic inflammation that drives both HIV disease progression and HIV-associated comorbidities.

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  • Ekholm, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Centre for Local Government Studies.
    Svensson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society.
    En strategi för samverkan och rörelse2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här rapporten handlar om Region Östergötlands folkhälsopolitiska strategi Sätt Östergötland i rörelse. Strategin utgör en ram för ett folkhälsoarbete som genomförs genom samverkan mellan en rad olika aktörer från olika sektorer och organisationer för att bidra till att befolkningen i Östergötland ökar sin fysiska aktivitet. Strategins mål är att sprida kunskap till olika aktörer om varför fysisk aktivitet är viktigt för exempelvis hälsa, jämlikhet, lärande, miljö och tillväxt, att genom inspiration och vägledning skapa positiva attityder hos samverkande aktörer samt att skapa beteendeförändringar hos de människor som deltar i aktiviteter inom ramen för strategin.

    Forskningsstudiens syfte är att skapa förståelse för hur strategin har genomförts, hur den uppfattas från olika deltagande aktörer samt att identifiera olika mekanismer i samverkan mellan aktörer som kan påverka huruvida strategin har förutsättningar att nå sina ambitioner. Följande frågeställningar undersöks särskilt: Hur går samverkan till i praktiken och hur upplever olika aktörer denna samverkan? Hur uppfattar olika samverkande aktörer mål och syfte med sitt och andras deltagande i strategin? Vilka delar i samverkansarbetet kan identifieras som mekanismer som påverkar hur strategins ambitioner kan förverkligas? Hur kan verksamheter inom ramen för Sätt Östergötland i rörelse följas upp och utvärderas med avseende på att värdera projektets måluppfyllelse? Forskningsstudien bygger på fokusgruppsintervjuer med aktörer involverade i strategin såsom regionpolitiker, regionstabspersoner, kommuntjänstepersoner, företrädare för organisationer i civilsamhället samt företrädare för en exempelkommun. Analysen tar avstamp i en antropologisk tradition av studier om politiskt beslutsfattande och förvaltning som riktar fokus mot hur policyprocessen är en praktik som präglas av de som deltar i den, deras föreställningar, förmågor och viljor.

    I presentationen av rapportens resultat lyfter vi fram hur samverkan sker genom en strategi där olika webbplattformar med exempel på fysiska aktiviteter kan utformas och spridas. Här lyfter vi också hur denna samverkan bygger på hur regionens politiska mål villkorar verksamheten, liksom hur andra aktörer i kommunerna och i civilsamhället aktiveras för att utveckla och bidra med exempel på aktiviteter som kan spridas. Vi visar vidare hur betydelsen av komplementära bidrag från olika aktörer framträder som ett centralt inslag ifråga om hur samverkan beskrivs. I det avseendet betonas inte minst den roll som civilsamhället tillskrivs, som en länk för att nå ut till särskilda målgrupper, som särskilt viktig. Möjligheterna med samverkan gäller framförallt hur olika aktörer kan bidra med olika resurser, kunskaper och insatser. Möjligheterna handlar också om att det innebär ett kostnadseffektivt sätt att arbeta på, inte minst när civilsamhällets organisationer bidrar med att utforma tjänster och aktiviteter för fysisk aktivitet och rörelse. Samtidigt betonas, i relation till samverkan, olika slags hinder för att realisera strategin, hinder som särskilt betonar de olika politiska, förvaltningsmässiga och organisatoriska villkor som gäller för olika aktörer i regionen, kommunerna och i civilsamhället. Eftersom sådana olika villkor skapar olika förutsättningar för delaktighet blir de viktiga att kommunicera kring. Aktörerna behöver skapa förståelse för varandras olika villkor för deltagande och samverkan, erkänna olika slags intressen och kalibrera mellan konflikterande målbilder för de olika aktörernas engagemang i strategin. I sådan kommunikation lyfts återkommande betydelsen av tillit fram för att möjliggöra samverkan. Analysen visar vidare hur samverkan inom ramen för strategin innebär en särskild form av informell styrning som inte framstår som hierarkisk eller tvingande, utan som opererar mer i termer av inspiration och tillhandahållande av exempel. Strategin Sätt Östergötland i rörelse som styrningsform skapar olika möjligheter för de samverkande aktörerna att bidra i folkhälsoarbetet men skapar samtidigt särskilda utmaningar som behöver hanteras. Sådana utmaningar handlar särskilt om otydlighet ifråga om strategins verktyg och medel samt hur dessa ska bidra till de politiska målen om ökad rörelse och fysisk aktivitet. Att strategins övergripande programteori antingen inte är fullt definierad eller framstår som fullt förankrad hos alla samverkande aktörer skapar vissa svårigheter för olika aktörer att tydligt förstå sin roll och de förväntningar som kan riktas mot den från andra aktörer. För att förverkliga högt ställda ambitioner gällande strategin behöver de samverkande aktörerna på ett mer grundläggande sätt förstå sin egen och andra aktörers roller. De behöver dessutom förstå att strategin utgör en förhållandevis abstrakt infrastruktur som ska möjliggöra utveckling och spridning av aktiviteter som goda exempel, mer än att vara en uppsättning befintliga aktiviteter som kan implementeras i verksamhet. Utöver att skapa inspiration och ett icke förpliktigande engagemang, erbjuder strategin dessutom en tolkningsram för enskilda aktörer att förstå sina egna verksamheter och aktiviteter som del i ett folkhälsopolitiskt sammanhang.

    Dessa resultat diskuteras fördjupat med fokus på strategins organisatoriska villkor för samverkan, särskilt med fokus på att identifiera de mekanismer som kan påverka möjligheterna att göra verklighet av strategins målsättningar. Här betonas olika aspekter av tydliggöranden kring och särskilt betydelsen av bred förankring av strategins programteori. En förankrad förståelse för relationen mellan strategins medel och mål behöver inte reglera hur aktiviteter för rörelse och fysisk aktivitet utvecklas eller bedrivs, men behöver ligga till grund för en delad och förankrad förståelse för de organisatoriska relationerna kring hur sådana aktiviteter kan utformas på en mångfald av sätt. Dessutom diskuteras hur detta sätt att styra kan förstås – som kännetecknas just av en komplementär idé om samverkan, hur olika aktörer kan aktiveras och styras på avstånd, genom spridning av goda exempel – kan förstås som en inspirationens biopolitik. Med det menar vi en politik som riktar sig mot att skapa hälsa och en livskraftig befolkning genom att använda sig av inspiration som medel och verktyg för att få olika aktörer att engagera sig i detta. Inspirationens biopolitik framträder som en möjlighet att nå ut till utsatta befolkningsgrupper, genom aktivering av civilsamhällets organisationer. Den framträder också som en möjlighet att bedriva storskaligt och ambitiöst folkhälsoarbete i tider av ekonomisk åtstramning och minskat investeringsutrymme för offentliga verksamheter. Därtill framträder inspirationens biopolitik som en möjlighet att styra utan formella regleringar av de samverkande aktörernas ageranden. Reflektion kring villkoren för samverkan och strategiskt arbete inom ramen för politiska målsättningar är central för att olika aktörer själva ska kunna utveckla verksamhet. I dessa avseenden kan rapporten bidra till strategin Sätt Östergötland i rörelses mål att möjliggöra rörelse och fysisk aktivitet hos befolkningen i Östergötland.

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  • Rohlen, Robin
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Biomed Engn, Dept Radiat Sci, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Stålberg, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rostedt Punga: Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Stoverud, Karen-Helene
    Umea Univ, Biomed Engn, Dept Radiat Sci, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Yu, Jun
    Umea Univ, Dept Math & Math Stat, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Gronlund, Christer
    Umea Univ, Biomed Engn, Dept Radiat Sci, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    A Method for Identification of Mechanical Response of Motor Units in Skeletal Muscle Voluntary Contractions Using Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging-Simulations and Experimental Tests2020In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536, Vol. 8, p. 50299-50311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The central nervous system coordinates movement through forces generated by motor units (MUs) in skeletal muscles. To analyze MUs function is essential in sports, rehabilitation medicine applications, and neuromuscular diagnostics. The MUs and their function are studied using electromyography. Typically, these methods study only a small muscle volume (1 mm(3)) or only a superficial (<1 cm) volume of the muscle. Here we introduce a method to identify so-called mechanical units, i.e., the mechanical response of electrically active MUs, in the whole muscle (4 x 4 cm, cross-sectional) under voluntary contractions by ultrafast ultrasound imaging and spatiotemporal decomposition. We evaluate the performance of the method by simulation of active MUs' mechanical response under weak contractions. We further test the experimental feasibility on eight healthy subjects. We show the existence of mechanical units that contribute to the tissue dynamics in the biceps brachii at low force levels and that these units are similar to MUs described by electromyography with respect to the number of units, territory sizes, and firing rates. This study introduces a new potential neuromuscular functional imaging method, which could be used to study a variety of questions on muscle physiology that previously were difficult or not possible to address.

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  • Klinthäll, Martin (Editor)
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Centre for Local Government Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Elebring, Marie-Louise (Photographer)
    Linköping University, University Services. Linköping University, Communications and Marketing Division.
    Johansson, Magnus (Photographer)
    Linköping University, University Services. Linköping University, Communications and Marketing Division.
    Verksamhetsberättelse 2019: Centrum för kommunstrategiska studier2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under verksamhetsåret 2019 har den vetenskapliga produktionen vid CKS fortsatt att hålla i stort sett samma höga nivå som för året 2018, då en ökning av antalet vetenskapliga publikationer kunde noteras i förhållande till tidigare år. Grundstödet från samarbetskommunerna, universitetet och regionen har möjliggjort forskningsprojekt som i flera fall kunnat skalas upp genom ansökningar till forskningsråd och andra finansiärer. I takt med nivån av externa forskningsprojekt som inbegriper medarbetare vid CKS har mängden publikationer i nationella och internationella sammanhang kunnat hålla en fortsatt hög nivå. Under 2019 har CKS medarbetare publicerat 20 artiklar i vetenskapligt granskade tidskrifter, 11 böcker och bokkapitel, 13 rapporter, främst i CKS rapportserie, men även för Svenskt Vatten Utveckling (SVU) och Sveriges kommuner och regioner (dåvarande SKL). Till detta kommer en lång rad konferensbidrag, populärvetenskapliga artiklar, krönikor och debattinlägg. CKS medarbetare har medverkat i såväl nationell som lokal TV och radio, som i en mängd tidningsartiklar, bloggar och andra media.

    Bland de externfinansierade forskningsprojekten som löpt på under 2019 märks ”Coast4us”, ett projekt som finansieras av EU/Interreg och handlar om medborgarinflytande i kustnära samhällsplanering; ”Inframaint” som studerar hantering av kommunala anläggningstillgångar i ett livscykelperspektiv, med stöd från Stiftelsen för miljöstrategisk forskning (Mistra); forskningsprojekt om koalitionsbyggande i den kommunala politiken, med finansiering av SKL, projekt om kunskapsstyrning i besöksnäringen, med finansiering av Tillväxtverket, samt ett projekt med stöd av Svenskt Vatten som studerar styrning och organisering av VA i svenska kommuner. Under 2019 har även ett antal nya projekt och samarbeten beviljats externa medel från bland annat Forte (planeringsprojekt om mellankommunal samverkan inom socialtjänsten) Nordiska rådet (nätverksstöd), följeforskningsprojekt i samarbete med Region Östergötland, samt samarbetsprojekt med Motala kommun, Finansdepartementet, och Kommunalekonomernas förening.

    När det gäller de arenor och mötesplatser som CKS arrangerar inom samverkansverksamheten ”CKS Lärande”, har aktiviteterna fortsatt utvecklas i enlighet med satta syften och målsättningar. CKS seminarieserie har under våren 2019 genomförts under temat ”En hållbar framtid”, med välbesökta seminarier i Vadstena, Valdemarsvik och Linköping. Hösten 2019 gick seminarieserien med tema ”Kommunal ekonomi”, då Norrköping, Motala och Kisa var värdkommuner för arrangemangen. Utbildningen för kommunala chefer som CKS erbjuder under namnet ”Ledarskap i kommuner” genomförs under läsåret 2019/2020 som ett interludium i form av ”Återträffar”, där tidigare kursdeltagare får möjlighet att reflektera och diskutera ledarskap i såväl retrospekt som utmaningar framåt. Samtidigt pågår planeringen för en ny och utvecklad ”Ledarskap i kommuner”, som sjösätts hösten 2020. Utöver dessa aktiviteter har vi fortsatt att arbeta som kunskapsresurs i nätverken för ledande kommunpolitiker och ledande kommunala tjänstepersoner i Östergötland med omnejd, deltagit i nätverk för kommunsekreterare/ kanslichefer samt fortsatt kunskapsutbytet med kommunenheten vid Finansdepartementet. Till detta kommer en rad samverkansaktiviteter som beskrivs i mer detalj längre fram i denna verksamhetsberättelse.

    CKS Forskningsstöd är ytterligare en del av verksamheten som ska gynna kommunstrategisk forskning vid Linköpings universitet. En andel av bidragen från samverkansavtalen används för att stödja kommunstrategisk forskning vid andra avdelningar på Linköpings universitet. År 2019 sjösattes följande fyra nya forskningsprojekt som totalt beviljats 5,6 miljoner kronor i forskningsstöd, med projektledare från fyra olika ämnen vid universitetet:

    Lena Högberg (Företagsekonomi) ”Organisering och styrning för balans mellan tillit och kontroll på en kundvalsmarknad för hemtjänst”.

    Bo Persson (Statsvetenskap): ”Utbildningspolitik som verktyg i regional utvecklingspolitik: Kommunerna och regional samverkan om yrkesutbildning”.

    Andreas Fejes (Vuxenpedagogik): ”Svenska för invandrare – att organisera för inkludering”.

    Peo Hansen, (Migration och etnicitet): ”Kommunalt flyktingmottagande och konflikten om framtidens statsfinanser”.

    Under år 2019 har ett antal anställningar genomförts. Våren 2019 anställdes Susanne Wallman Lundåsen, docent i statsvetenskap från Mittuniversitetet, som universitetslektor i vid CKS, i konkurrens med ett stort antal sökande. Under våren anställdes även Erik Eriksson som biträdande lektor och Richard Öhrvall erhöll en tjänst som postdoktor. CKS har fortsatt sin satsning på kommunikation och under året knutit kommunikatör Marie- Louise Elebring till verksamheten. Under hösten 2019 har CKS utlyst ytterligare två postdoktorsanställningar och totalt fyra forskningsassistenter har rekryterats till avdelningen under året. Våren 2019 hade CKS även samarbete med avdelningen för statsvetenskap genom tre praktikplatser för studenter vid mastersutbildningen i statsvetenskap. För att ytterligare stärka upp våra forskningsfält och enskilda forskningsprojekt samarbetar CKS med flera avdelningar på Linköpings universitet, där forskare erbjuds forskningstid på CKS genom delade anställningar.

    Bokslutet för verksamhetsåret 2019 visar ett minskat överskott, vilket är i linje med intentionerna i budget inför 2019. I förhållande till tidigare år har större del av de ackumulerade medlen har tagits i anspråk för att bemanna forskningsprojekt och samverkansaktiviteter. Som beskrivs ovan har detta skett såväl genom långsiktig rekrytering, som tidsbegränsade anställningar och delade tjänster.

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  • Gorini, Giacomo
    et al.
    NCI, Anim Models & Retroviral Vaccines Sect, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Fourati, Slim
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Pathol, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Vaccari, Monica
    NCI, Anim Models & Retroviral Vaccines Sect, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Rahman, Mohammad Arif
    NCI, Anim Models & Retroviral Vaccines Sect, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Gordon, Shari N.
    GlaxoSmithKline R&D, Dept Infect Dis, Res Triangle Pk, NC USA..
    Brown, Dallas R.
    NCI, Anim Models & Retroviral Vaccines Sect, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Law, Lynn
    Univ Washington, Ctr Innate Immun & Immune Dis, Dept Immunol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Washington Natl Primate Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Chang, Jean
    Univ Washington, Ctr Innate Immun & Immune Dis, Dept Immunol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Washington Natl Primate Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Green, Richard
    Univ Washington, Ctr Innate Immun & Immune Dis, Dept Immunol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Washington Natl Primate Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Barrenäs, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics. Univ Washington, Ctr Innate Immun & Immune Dis, Dept Immunol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Washington Natl Primate Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Liyanage, Namal P. M.
    NCI, Anim Models & Retroviral Vaccines Sect, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;Ohio State Univ, Coll Med, Dept Microbial Infect & Immun, Columbus, OH 43210 USA..
    Doster, Melvin N.
    NCI, Anim Models & Retroviral Vaccines Sect, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Schifanella, Luca
    NCI, Anim Models & Retroviral Vaccines Sect, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Bissa, Massimiliano
    NCI, Anim Models & Retroviral Vaccines Sect, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    de Castro, Isabela Silva
    NCI, Anim Models & Retroviral Vaccines Sect, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Washington-Parks, Robyn
    NCI, Anim Models & Retroviral Vaccines Sect, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Galli, Veronica
    NCI, Anim Models & Retroviral Vaccines Sect, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Fuller, Deborah H.
    Univ Washington, Ctr Innate Immun & Immune Dis, Dept Immunol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Washington Natl Primate Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Santra, Sampa
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Agy, Michael
    Duke Univ, Sch Med, Div Surg Sci, Durham, NC USA..
    Pal, Ranajit
    Adv Biosci Labs, Rockville, MD USA..
    Palermo, Robert E.
    Univ Washington, Ctr Innate Immun & Immune Dis, Dept Immunol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Washington Natl Primate Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Tomaras, Georgia D.
    Duke Univ, Sch Med, Div Surg Sci, Durham, NC USA..
    Shen, Xiaoying
    Duke Univ, Sch Med, Div Surg Sci, Durham, NC USA..
    LaBranche, Celia C.
    Duke Univ, Sch Med, Div Surg Sci, Durham, NC USA..
    Montefiori, David C.
    Duke Univ, Sch Med, Div Surg Sci, Durham, NC USA..
    Venzon, David J.
    NCI, Biostat & Data Management Sect, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Trinh, Hung, V
    US Mil HIV Res Program, Walter Reed Army Inst Res, Silver Spring, MD USA..
    Rao, Mangala
    US Mil HIV Res Program, Walter Reed Army Inst Res, Silver Spring, MD USA..
    Gale, Michael, Jr.
    Univ Washington, Ctr Innate Immun & Immune Dis, Dept Immunol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Washington Natl Primate Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Sekaly, Rafick P.
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Pathol, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA..
    Franchini, Genoveffa
    NCI, Anim Models & Retroviral Vaccines Sect, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Engagement of monocytes, NK cells, and CD4(+) Th1 cells by ALVAC-SIV vaccination results in a decreased risk of SIVmac251 vaginal acquisition2020In: PLoS Pathogens, ISSN 1553-7366, E-ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 16, no 3, article id e1008377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ALVAC-HIV/gp120/alum regimen tested in 8,197 human volunteers (61.4% males, 38.6% females) in the RV144 trial decreased the risk of HIV infection similarly in both sexes. The ALVAC-SIV/gp120/alum vaccine also reduced the risk of intrarectal SIVmac251 acquisition in both female and male vaccinated macaques at an average of 44% per exposure. In the current work, we tested whether this vaccine modality could also reduce the risk of intravaginal SIVmac251 exposure. In order to detect correlates of risk, we administered the virus by the intravaginal route and tested another vaccine regimen based on the vaccinia derivative poxvirus NYVAC in parallel. We demonstrate here that the ALVAC-SIV/gp120/alum regimen decreases the risk of vaginal SIVmac251 acquisition (50% vaccine efficacy) and, importantly, we confirmed that subsets of monocytes and CD4(+) T cells are correlates of risk of acquisition. In addition, we uncovered cytotoxic vaginal NKG2A(+) cells and gut-homing alpha(4)beta(7) positive plasmablasts as novel correlates of risk of intravaginal virus acquisition. In contrast, NYVAC-SIV vaccination induced high levels of activated T cells and did not protect against SIVmac251 acquisition. We examined the contrasting immune responses to better understand the correlate of protection and found that the unique ability of ALVAC-SIV to activate early interferon responses and the inflammasome during priming differentiates the two poxvirus vectors. This work demonstrates the reproducibility of the efficacy observed in the ALVAC-based regimen and defines novel correlates of risk in the rigorous SIVmac251 macaque model, establishing a benchmark for future improvement of this vaccine approach. The recombinant Canarypox ALVAC-HIV/gp120/alum vaccine regimen was the first to significantly decrease the risk of HIV acquisition in humans, with equal effectiveness in both males and females. Similarly, an equivalent SIV-based ALVAC vaccine regimen decreased the risk of virus acquisition in Indian rhesus macaques of both sexes following intrarectal exposure to low doses of SIVmac251. Here, we demonstrate that the ALVAC-SIV/gp120/alum vaccine is also efficacious in female Chinese rhesus macaques following intravaginal exposure to low doses of SIVmac251 and we confirm that CD14(+) classical monocytes are a strong correlate of decreased risk of virus acquisition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the frequency of CD14(+) cells and/or their gene expression correlates with blood Type 1 CD4(+) T helper cells, alpha(4)beta(+)(7) plasmablasts, and vaginal cytocidal NKG2A(+) cells. To better understand the correlate of protection, we contrasted the ALVAC-SIV vaccine with a NYVAC-based SIV/gp120 regimen that used the identical immunogen. We found that NYVAC-SIV induced higher immune activation via CD4(+)Ki67(+)CD38(+) and CD4(+)Ki67(+)alpha(4)beta(+)(7) T cells, higher SIV envelope-specific IFN-gamma producing cells, equivalent ADCC, and did not decrease the risk of SIVmac251 acquisition. Using the systems biology approach, we demonstrate that specific expression profiles of plasmablasts, NKG2A(+) cells, and monocytes elicited by the ALVAC-based regimen correlated with decreased risk of virus acquisition.

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  • Pfeiffer, Andreas F. H.
    et al.
    German Inst Human Nutr Potsdam Rehbrucke, Clin Nutr DZD, Arthur Scheunert Allee 114-116, D-14558 Nuthetal, Germany.;Charite, Dept Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Campus Benjamin Franklin,Hindenburgdamm 30, D-12203 Berlin, Germany.;German Ctr Diabet Res DZD, D-85764 Munich, Germany..
    Pedersen, Eva
    Univ South Australia, Sch Pharm & Med Sci, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia..
    Schwab, Ursula
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Publ Hlth & Clin Nutr, Sch Med, Kuopio Campus, Kuopio 70211, Finland.;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Dept Med Endocrinol & Clin Nutr, Kys Kuopio 70029, Finland..
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Aas, Anne-Marie
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Div Med, Sect Nutr & Dietet, Dept Clin Serv, N-0424 Oslo, Norway..
    Uusitupa, Matti
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Publ Hlth & Clin Nutr, Sch Med, Kuopio Campus, Kuopio 70211, Finland..
    Thanopoulou, Anastasia
    Natl & Kapodistian Univ Athens, Sch Med, Dept Internal Med 2, Ctr Diabet, Athens 11527, Greece..
    Kendall, Cyril
    Univ Toronto, Dept Nutr Sci, Fac Med, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada.;St Michaels Hosp, Toronto 3D Knowledge Synth & Clin Trials Unit, Clin Nutr & Risk Factor Modificat Ctr, Toronto, ON M5C 2T2, Canada..
    Sievenpiper, John L.
    Univ Toronto, Dept Nutr Sci, Fac Med, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada.;St Michaels Hosp, Toronto 3D Knowledge Synth & Clin Trials Unit, Clin Nutr & Risk Factor Modificat Ctr, Toronto, ON M5C 2T2, Canada.;St Michaels Hosp, Div Endocrinol & Metab, Dept Med, Toronto, ON M5C 2T2, Canada.;St Michaels Hosp, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Inst, Toronto, ON M5C 2T2, Canada..
    Kahleova, Hana
    Inst Clin & Expt Med, Prague 14021, Czech Republic.;Phys Comm Responsible Med, Washington, DC 20016 USA..
    Rahelic, Dario
    Merkur Univ Hosp, Endocrinol & Metab Dis, Vuk Vrhovac Univ Clin Diabet, Zagreb 10000, Croatia.;Univ Zagreb, Sch Med, Zagreb 10000, Croatia..
    Salas-Salvado, Jordi
    Univ Rovira & Virgili, Human Nutr Unit, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Inst Hlth Pere Virgili, Reus 43201, Spain.;Inst Salud Carlos III, CIBER Fisiopatol Obesidad & Nutr CIBEROBN, Madrid 28029, Spain..
    Gebauer, Stephanie
    German Inst Human Nutr Potsdam Rehbrucke, Clin Nutr DZD, Arthur Scheunert Allee 114-116, D-14558 Nuthetal, Germany.;German Ctr Diabet Res DZD, D-85764 Munich, Germany..
    Hermansen, Kjeld
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol & Metab, DK-8200 Aarhus, Denmark..
    The Effects of Different Quantities and Qualities of Protein Intake in People with Diabetes Mellitus2020In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recommended amount and quality of protein in diets of diabetic patients are highly controversial. In order to provide evidence-based information, the Diabetes Nutrition Study Group (DNSG) used a grading procedure used for quality of evidence and strength of recommendations (GRADE). A protein intake of 10% to 20% of energy intake (E%) or about 0.8 to 1.3 g/kg body weight in people below 65 years of age, and 15% to 20% of E% in people above 65 years of age appeared safe in weight-stable conditions. There were no intervention studies addressing metabolic effects, mortality, or cardiovascular events over prolonged periods. Body weight is closely linked to metabolic control and high protein diets are often recommended. Weight-loss diets that include 23% to 32% of E% as protein for up to one year reduced blood pressure and body weight slightly but significantly more than lower protein diets, whereas blood lipids, fasting blood glucose, and HbA1c improved similarly with higher or lower protein intakes in participants with a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) >60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Patients with a GFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) did not show a faster decline of GFR or kidney function with protein intakes around 0.8 g/kg body weight as compared with lower intakes, thereby arguing against a restriction. The effects of protein intake on diabetic eye or nerve disease have not been reported. There are a number of studies that have compared different types of animal proteins (milk, chicken, beef, pork, and fish) or compared animal with plant protein in diabetic patients and have reported a greater reduction of serum cholesterol with plant protein. In summary, the suggested range of protein intake appears to be safe and can be adapted according to personal dietary preferences.

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  • Hoppe, Julia A.
    et al.
    University of Paderborn, Germany.
    Johansson-Pajala, Rose-Marie
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Christine
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Health and Welfare.
    Melkas, Helinä
    Lappeenranta-Lahti University of technology, Finland.
    Tuisku, Outi
    Lappeenranta-Lahti University of technology, Finland.
    Pekkarinen, Satu
    Lappeenranta-Lahti University of technology, Finland.
    Hennala, Lea
    Lappeenranta-Lahti University of technology, Finland.
    Thommes, Kirsten
    University of Paderborn, Germany.
    Assistive robots in care: Expectations and pereceptions of older people2020In: Aging between Participation and Simulation, De Gruyter Open, 2020, p. 139-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter analyzes older people’s expectations and perceptions about welfare technology and in particular about robots in elderly care. Assistive robots may serve as a means to prolonged autonomy in old age as well as support for nursing staff. Justified by a rapid change in the health care sector, the need to focus on user driven and not technology driven development of assistive robots must be emphasized to ensure an adequate and sustainable orientation process toward assistive robots. This study presents an inventory of the expectations and perceptions of older people regarding assistive robots, by conducting a qualitative approach with focus group discussions. Our findings reveal that seven themes in particular need to be addressed in order to improve older people’s perceptions of robot technology: (1) independence and safety, (2) physical and mental assistance, (3) communication and socialization, (4) relief to nursing staff, (5) individual’s right to decide, (6) data protection, and (7) liability. Additionally, the focus group interviews stress that dissemination of information on how robots can provide assistance may change older people’s attitudes towards technology

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  • Laustsen, Christine E.
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Peterson, Pia
    Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Westergren, Albert
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment PRO-CARE, Patient Reported Outcomes - Clinical Assessment Research and Education. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Haak, Maria
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.
    Exploring health professionals´ experiences of being involved in a research project2020In: Knowledge Management Research & Practice, ISSN 1477-8238, E-ISSN 1477-8246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The involvement of health professionals in research may ensure the acquisition of relevant and sustainable knowledge that is applicable in practice. However, knowledge is lacking about how professionals experience being involved. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore how health professionals experienced the process of being involved in a project related to research on ageing and health. Data was collected through seventeen interviews and analysed using a grounded theory approach. The findings illustrate the health professionals’ experiences of an adaptation process that occurred, e.g., adapting practice and research to facilitate collaboration and the ability to co-create. Influenced by circumstances and through ongoing negotiations and breakthroughs, co-creation was experienced, based on the health professionals’ and researchers’ trustful relationships. In conclusion, this new knowledge may be useful in designing and implementing future studies that involve health professionals in research projects on ageing and health.

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  • Nilsson, Kerstin
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för folkhälsovetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Forskningsmiljön Människa - Hälsa - Samhälle (MHS). Lunds universitet.
    When is work a cause of early retirement and are there any effective organizational measures to combat this?: a population-based study of perceived work environment and work-related disorders among employees in Sweden2020In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 20, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The ageing workforce has an impact on public health. The aim of this study was to evaluate work-related disorders, work tasks and measures associated with the possibility of working beyond 65 years of age or not.

    METHOD: The data comprised two sample surveys based on the Swedish population: the Survey of National Work-Related Health Disorders, and the National Work Environment Survey.

    RESULTS: A logistic regression analysis showed that an active systematic work environmental management in the workplace was a statistically significant association with whether individuals could work in their current occupation until 65 years of age (OR 1.7). The final multivariate model stated that whether individuals could work until 65 years was associated with bodily exhaustion after work, frequent feeling of the own work effort being insufficient at the end of the day, experience of the work as restricted and with a lack of freedom, working alone and at risk of unsafe or threatening situations, and generally feeling dissatisfied with the work tasks. Women-dominated workplaces were more highly associated with both male and female employees not being able to work until age 65 (OR 1.6).

    CONCLUSION: Deficiencies in the working environment seems to be a threat to the public health. An active systematic work environmental management in the workplace increases the possibility to extend the working life. Tools for managers, like the swAge-model, to easily perform active systematic work environmental controls could therefore be a possible way to decrease the risk of work injury as well as increase the possibility for a sustainable extended working life.

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  • Sauciuc, Gabriela-Alina
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Zlakowska, Jagoda
    Polen.
    Persson, Tomas
    Lunds universitet.
    Lenninger, Sara M.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning fritidshem och förskola.
    Alenkaer Madsen, Elainie
    Lunds universitet.
    Imitation recognition and its prosocial effects in 6-month old infants2020In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 15, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The experience of being imitated is theorised to be a driving force of infant social cognition, yet evidence on the emergence of imitation recognition and the effects of imitation in early infancy is disproportionately scarce. To address this lack of empirical evidence, in a within-subjects study we compared the responses of 6-month old infants when exposed to ipsilateral imitation as opposed to non-imitative contingent responding. To examine mediating mechanisms of imitation recognition, infants were also exposed to contralateral imitation and bodily imitation with suppressed emotional mimicry. We found that testing behaviours-the hallmark of high-level imitation recognition-occurred at significantly higher rates in each of the imitation conditions compared to the contingent responding condition. Moreover, when being imitated, infants showed higher levels of attention, smiling and approach behaviours compared to the contingent responding condition. The suppression of emotional mimicry moderated these results, leading to a decrease in all social responsiveness measures. The results show that imitation engenders prosocial effects in 6-month old infants and that infants at this age reliably show evidence of implicit and high-level imitation recognition. In turn, the latter can be indicative of infants' sensitivity to others' intentions directed toward them.

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  • Shirdel, Mona
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Anderson, Fredrick
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Axelsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Rutegård, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Blomqvist, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Gylling, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Body composition measured by computed tomography is associated with colorectal cancer survival, also in early-stage disease2020In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cachexia and sarcopenia are associated with poor survival after colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis. Computed tomography (CT) can be used to measure aspects of cachexia including sarcopenia, myosteatosis and the amount of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue. The aim of this study was to relate CT-based body composition variables with survival outcomes in CRC. Material and methods: In this population-based, retrospective cohort study, CT scans of 974 patients with pathological stages I-IV CRCs, collected at or very near diagnosis (years 2000-2016), were used to measure cross-sectional fat and muscle tissue areas. Body composition variables based on these measurements were assessed in relation to tumor stage and site and cancer-specific survival in stages I-III CRC (n = 728) using Cox proportional hazards models and Kaplan-Meier estimators. Results: Sarcopenia was associated with decreased cancer-specific survival, especially in patients with stages I-II tumors. The hazard ratio (HR) for the lowest versus highest tertile of skeletal muscle index (SMI) was 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.08-2.58 for all stages, and HR 2.22; 95% CI 1.06-4.68, for stages I-II. Myosteatosis was also associated with decreased cancer-specific survival [(HR 2.03; 95% CI 1.20-3.34 for the lowest versus the highest tertile of skeletal muscle radiodensity (SMR)]. SMI and SMR were lower in patients with right-sided CRC, independent of age and sex. No adipose tissue measurement was significantly associated with cancer-specific survival. Conclusion: In concordance with previous studies, sarcopenia and myosteatosis were associated with decreased cancer-specific survival. The strong association between sarcopenia and poor cancer-specific survival in early-stage disease could have clinical implications for personalizing therapy decisions, including nutritional support.

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  • van Wietmarschen, Herman A.
    et al.
    Louis Bolk Institute, Bunnik, 3981, Netherlands.
    Busch, Martine
    Van Praag Institute, Utrecht 3511, Netherlands.
    van Oostveen, Annemiek
    Rivas Zorggroep, Sliedrecht, Netherlands.
    Pot, Gerda
    Louis Bolk Institute, Bunnik, 3981, Netherlands.
    Jong, Miek C.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Probiotics use for antibiotic-associated diarrhea: a pragmatic participatory evaluation in nursing homes2020In: BMC Gastroenterology, ISSN 1471-230X, E-ISSN 1471-230X, Vol. 20, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) occurs in 2-25% of nursing home residents, which may lead to dehydration, malnutrition, severe complications and hospitalizations. Research shows that probiotics can be effective and safe in reducing AAD. However, probiotics are not routinely used in Dutch nursing homes. The objectives of this evaluation were to develop a procedure for the implementation of probiotics to prevent AAD in nursing homes, to evaluate effects on AAD occurrence, and to evaluate the implementation process of probiotics in daily care. METHODS: A pragmatic participatory evaluation (PPE) design was chosen, as it seemed a suitable approach for implementation of probiotics, as well as for evaluation of its effectiveness in daily nursing home practice. Probiotics administration was implemented in three nursing homes of the Rivas Zorggroep for residents with somatic and/or psychogeriatric conditions. Ninety-three residents provided data on 167 episodes of antibiotics use, of which 84 episodes that included supplementation with probiotics and 83 episodes with no probiotics supplementation. A multispecies probiotics was administered twice daily upon start of antibiotic treatment, up to 1 week after completing the antibiotics course. The occurrence of AAD was monitored and a process evaluation was conducted to assess facilitators and barriers of probiotics implementation. RESULTS: The number of episodes with AAD when using probiotics was significantly lower than when no probiotics was used (20% vs 36%; p = 0,022, Chi-square). No significant differences in the occurrence of AAD were found between the residents taking amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or ciprofloxacin. Reported facilitators for implementation were perceived benefits of probiotics and prescription by medical staff. Reported challenges were probiotics intake by residents and individual decision-making as to which resident would benefit from it. CONCLUSION: Successful implementation of probiotics demonstrated the prevention of AAD in nursing home residents. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN 94786163, retrospectively registered on 3 February 2020.

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  • Mosleh, Marwan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Ministry of Health, Gaza, Palestine.
    Al Jeesh, Y.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty, Kazakhstan.
    Eriksson, C.
    Carlerby, Heidi
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Viitasara, Eija
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Barriers to managing and delivery of care to war-injured survivors or patients with non-communicable disease: a qualitative study of Palestinian patients' and policy-makers' perspectives2020In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 20, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Improving access to optimal quality of care is a core priority and ambitious health policy goal in spite of impediments, threats and challenges in Palestine. Understanding the factors that may impede quality of care is essential in developing an effective healthcare intervention for patient with non-communicable disease (NCD) or war-injured survivors. METHODS: Qualitative interviews were performed using a purposive sampling strategy of 18 political-key informants, 10 patients with NCD and 7 war-injured survivors from different health facilities in Gaza Strip. A semi-structured interview guide was developed for data collection. The interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Important field notes of the individual interviews were also reported. Thematic-driven analytic approach was used to identify key themes and patterns. RESULTS: From the policy maker's perspective, the following important barriers to accessing optimal healthcare for patients with NCD or war-injured survivors' treatment were identified; 1) organizational/structural 2) availability 3) communication 4) personnel/lack of staff 5) financial and political barriers. Patient with NCD or war-injury had similar experiences of barriers as the policy makers. In addition, they also identified socioeconomic, physical and psychological barriers for accessing optimal healthcare and treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The main perceived barriers explored through this study will be very interesting and useful if they are considered seriously and handled carefully, in order to ensure efficient, productive, cost-effective intervention and delivery of a high-standard quality of care and better disease management.

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  • Henriksson, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Astrophysics.
    Aristotle, King David, King Zhou and Pharao Thutmosis III have seen comet Encke2020In: MEDITERRANEAN ARCHAEOLOGY & ARCHAEOMETRY, ISSN 1108-9628, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 29-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aristotle saw a great winter comet with a tail reaching up to Orion. It was Comet Encke on 31 December in 372 BC. When it became visible in the morning, after 9 January 371 BC, Ephoros saw its nucleus split up in two parts. The sword of the Angel of the Lord seen above Jerusalem, as punishment for the sins by King David, was Comet Encke in 964 BC. The sword was redrawn at Ornan.s threshing floor on 8 June 964 BC. David bought this place and built an altar that later became the Altar of Salomon.s Temple in Jerusalem. A second century BC text contains a unique record of a bright comet observed at the end of the Shang Dynasty:.When King Wu [of Zhou] attacked King Zhou [of Shang], a comet appeared and tendered its handle to Yin.. This was Comet Encke on 22 June 1060 BC and 17 days later, on 9 July in 1060 BC, Encke was depicted on a rock carving in Sweden. A stele at the temple of Amon at Gebel Barkal in Nubia, mentions first the important victories at Megiddo, in year 33, and Mittani, in year 23 of the reign of Pharaoh Thutmosis III. However, the text also mentions an important celestial phenomenon during his 47th year of reign. The description fits very well with the bright appearance of Comet Encke at the end of January in 1460 BC. This supports the High Chronology for Egypt with 1506 BC as the first year of reign of Thutmosis III, the sixth Pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty in Egypt.

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  • Kovacs, Alexander
    et al.
    Danube Univ Krems, Dept Integrated Sensor Syst, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt, Austria..
    Fischbacher, Johann
    Danube Univ Krems, Dept Integrated Sensor Syst, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt, Austria..
    Gusenbauer, Markus
    Danube Univ Krems, Dept Integrated Sensor Syst, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt, Austria..
    Oezelt, Harald
    Danube Univ Krems, Dept Integrated Sensor Syst, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt, Austria..
    Herper, Heike C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Vekilova, Olga Yu.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Nieves, Pablo
    Univ Burgos, Int Res Ctr Crit Raw Mat Adv Ind Technol, Burgos 09001, Spain.;VSB Tech Univ Ostrava, IT4Innovat, Ostrava 70833, Czech Republic..
    Arapan, Sergiu
    Univ Burgos, Int Res Ctr Crit Raw Mat Adv Ind Technol, Burgos 09001, Spain.;VSB Tech Univ Ostrava, IT4Innovat, Ostrava 70833, Czech Republic..
    Schrefl, Thomas
    Danube Univ Krems, Dept Integrated Sensor Syst, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt, Austria..
    Computational Design of Rare-Earth Reduced Permanent Magnets2020In: ENGINEERING, ISSN 2095-8099, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 148-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiscale simulation is a key research tool in the quest for new permanent magnets. Starting with first principles methods, a sequence of simulation methods can be applied to calculate the maximum possible coercive field and expected energy density product of a magnet made from a novel magnetic material composition. Iron (Fe)-rich magnetic phases suitable for permanent magnets can be found by means of adaptive genetic algorithms. The intrinsic properties computed by ab intro simulations are used as input for micromagnetic simulations of the hysteresis properties of permanent magnets with a realistic structure. Using machine learning techniques, the magnet's structure can be optimized so that the upper limits for coercivity and energy density product for a given phase can be estimated. Structure property relations of synthetic permanent magnets were computed for several candidate hard magnetic phases. The following pairs (coercive field (T), energy density product (kJ.m(-3))) were obtained for iron-tin-antimony (Fe3Sn0.75Sb0.25): (0.49, 290), L1(0) -ordered iron-nickel (L1(0) FeNi): (1, 400), cobalt-iron-tantalum (CoFe6Ta): (0.87, 425), and manganese-aluminum (MnAl): (0.53, 80).

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  • Ignatov, Dmitriy
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Vaitkevicius, Karolis
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Durand, Sylvain
    Cahoon, Laty
    Sandberg, Stefanie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Liu, Xijia
    Kallipolitis, Birgitte H.
    Ryden, Patrik
    Freitag, Nancy
    Condon, Ciaran
    Johansson, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    An mRNA-mRNA Interaction Couples Expression of a Virulence Factor and Its Chaperone in Listeria monocytogenes2020In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 30, no 12, p. 4027-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial pathogens often employ RNA regulatory elements located in the 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) to control gene expression. Using a comparative structural analysis, we examine the structure of 5' UTRs at a global scale in the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes under different conditions. In addition to discovering an RNA thermoswitch and detecting simultaneous interaction of ribosomes and small RNAs with mRNA, we identify structural changes in the 5' UTR of an mRNA encoding the post-translocation chaperone PrsA2 during infection conditions. We demonstrate that the 5' UTR of the prsA2 mRNA base pairs with the 3' UTR of the full-length hly mRNA encoding listeriolysin O, thus preventing RNase J1-mediated degradation of the prsA2 transcript. Mutants lacking the hly-prsA2 interaction exhibit reduced virulence properties. This work highlights an additional level of RNA regulation, where the mRNA encoding a chaperone is stabilized by the mRNA encoding its substrate.

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  • Schmedes, Clare M
    et al.
    Grover, Steven P
    Hisada, Yohei M
    Goeijenbier, Marco
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Nilsson, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Thunberg, Therese
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Mackman, Nigel
    Connolly-Andersen, Anne-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Increased circulating extracellular vesicle tissue factor activity during orthohantavirus infection is associated with intravascular coagulation.2019In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0022-1899, E-ISSN 1537-6613, article id jiz597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Puumala (PUUV) orthohantavirus causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). HFRS patients have an activated coagulation system with increased risk of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and venous thromboembolism (VTE). The aim of the study was to determine if circulating extracellular vesicle tissue factor (EVTF) activity levels associates with DIC and VTE (grouped as intravascular coagulation) in HFRS patients.

    METHODS: Longitudinal samples were collected from 88 HFRS patients. Patients were stratified into groups of those with intravascular coagulation (n=27) and those who did not (n=61). We measured levels of circulating EVTF activity, fibrinogen, activated partial prothrombin time, prothrombin time international normalized ratio, D-dimer, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and platelets.

    RESULTS: Plasma EVTF activity was transiently increased during HFRS. Levels of EVTF activity significantly associated with plasma tPA and PAI-1, suggesting endothelial cells as a potential source. Patients with intravascular coagulation had significantly higher peak EVTF activity levels compared to those who did not. The peak EVTF activity value predicting intravascular coagulation was 0.51 ng/L with 63% sensitivity and 61% specificity with AUC 0.63 (95% CI 0.51 - 0.76), p-value 0.046.

    CONCLUSIONS: Increased circulating EVTF activity during HFRS is associated with intravascular coagulation.

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  • Carpentier, Nico
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media. Charles Univ Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.;Vrije Univ Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    Communicating Academic Knowledge Beyond the Written Academic Text: An Autoethnographic Analysis of the Mirror Palace of Democracy Installation Experiment2020In: International Journal of Communication, ISSN 1932-8036, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 14, p. 2120-2143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article first discusses five approaches that aim to transcend, complement, or overturn the hegemony of the written academic text. These five approaches are (1) the cluster of science communication, science popularization, and knowledge dissemination; (2) the cluster of knowledge exchange, and participatory, transformative, and interventionist (action) research; (3) multimodal academic communication; (4) the cluster of visual anthropology and visual sociology; and (5) arts-based research. As each approach deals with (overcoming) the hegemony of the written academic text differently, the first part of the article details these approaches. In the second part, the Mirror Palace of Democracy installation experiment, which had the explicit objective of moving beyond the written academic text while still remaining in the realm of academic knowledge communication, is autoethnographically analyzed. The experiment allowed reflection on the integrated and iterative nature of academic communication, on the hybrid academic-artistic identity, and on the diversification of publics. Both the theoretical discussion on the five approaches and the Mirror Palace of Democracy installation are part of a call for more experimentation with, and theorization of, multimodal and/or arts-based academic communication.

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  • Norefjäll, Fredric
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Talalasova, Elena
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Tekie, Haben
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Barriers for industrial waste recycling in the context of circular transition: lessons from Mistra Closing the Loop2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the final deliverable from a task within the national research program Mistra Closing the Loop (CTL). It aimed at analysing the barriers and drivers for industrial waste recycling as a part of transition towards a circular society. In doing so, we drew on the experiences from five projects participating in CTL. Found below is a graphical abstract capturing both of the logic behind the research and the main results.

    Industrial recycling as part of a broader transition towards a more circular society faces an overwhelming number of obstacles on all system levels. Apart from being a source of despair, long, unprioritised lists of barriers can lead to diffusion of efforts and resources while attempting to tackle them all at once. In addition, these barriers have traditionally been regarded as separate entities, and little is known about the relationships between them. In this report, we argue for a shift in how we study and act on the barriers for circular transition. More specifically, we call for:

    • a need to better understand the links, relationships and dynamics between different barriers and barrier groups• a need for methodological experimentation and more action-oriented research• a more targeted approach, where resources are pulled towards tackling a few barriers with a scientifically demonstrated potential to accelerate the change

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  • Valge, Claudia
    et al.
    Estonian Academy of Arts.
    Bertacchi, Silvia
    University of Bologna.
    Carlsten, Susanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History, Conservation.
    Kormpaki, Theodora
    Estonian Academy of Arts.
    Õunapuu, Varje
    Estonian Academy of Arts.
    Ribelus, Kristiina
    Estonian Academy of Arts.
    Toom, Johanna
    Estonian Academy of Arts.
    Vinnal, Hannes
    Estonian Academy of Arts.
    Coulour Measurement and Documentation in Architectural Paint Research: International workshop - Final report2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The international workshop titled “Colour Measurement and Documentation in Architectural Paint Research” took place on the 22nd–25th of October, 2019 in Tallinn and Kirna, Estonia. The workshop was organised by the Department of Cultural Heritage and Conservation of the Estonian Academy of Arts. Lecturers, conservators, heritage officials, architectural conservation students and architectural paint research specialists from Estonia, Italy, Sweden, the Netherlands, Latvia and Lithuania made up the 25 participants of the workshop.

    After the international participants arrived on the 21st of October, the workshop formally begun on the following day. In the first half of the day, keynote lectures by Estonian and international speakers were held at the Estonian Academy of Arts. In the afternoon, the workshop participants left Tallinn for Järva County, first visiting the Purdi manor house to get acquainted with the architectural paint research practice in Estonia. Then, the group headed to the Kirna manor house and received an introductory tour of the building from one of its owners. Next morning, everyone once again assembled at the Kirna manor house and some of the participants presented case studies about their previous paint research projects. Subsequently, the 2-day long practical workshop begun with the participants being split into five research teams, each assigned a vault in the manor house entrance hall for paint investigation.

    The main aim of the workshop and the research in the entrance hall was to test out different paint investigation and colour measuring methods, techniques and tools (including colour measurement devices like colourimeters and spectrophotometers). The wider objective of this was to optimise and modernise the way historical colour information on architectural surfaces is identified, documented and preserved in Estonia and abroad. To learn from international expertise, the five research teams were assigned leaders from different countries (the Netherlands, Lithuania, Italy, Sweden, and Estonia), with each leader instructing their team members according to the prevalent architectural paint research methods in their respective country. Thus, every team had a distinct methodology and the participants were introduced to various research styles and techniques, which differ significantly between countries and researchers.

    In addition to the professional and educational purpose, it was also intended to investigate the finishes of the five vaults (one assigned to each team) and their adjacent architectural features. The preliminary research questions for the entrance hall are presented in chapter 4.1. In order to ascertain the historical paint layers and constructional stages, mechanical paint exposures and smaller openings were made in strategic areas like the vaults, pillars and pilasters, walls, window and door openings, doors, and the stucco decor on the vaults. Additionally, a few research teams took cross-sections of the finishes, some of which were microscopically examined to clarify the paint stratigraphy and pigments. The results were documented separately by each team in the form of reports and paint exposure/cross-section charts included in chapter 5. The team reports were mainly compiled by the participating students from the EAA Department of Cultural Heritage and Conservation, however, other team members contributed as well. The main results of the architectural paint research in the entrance hall, as well as a relative chronology of the discovered decorative finishes are presented in chapter 6. As the Kirna manor house is a listed building, permission for the aforementioned research was acquired beforehand by presenting the Estonian National Heritage Board a plan of action, which was approved by the Senior Inspector for Järva County.1

    Simultaneously with the paint research, a colour vision test was conducted with the workshop participants. In the first part of the experiment, the test subjects were asked to describe and determine the colour of two different historical paint layers on one entrance hall wall in two different lighting conditions using the NCS INDEX 1950 colour chart. After the experiment was performed by all of the participants present, the colours were scientifically ascertained with the colourimeters NCS Colourpin SE and NCS Colour Scan 1.0 RM200, as well as the Konica Minolta Spectrophotometer CM 2300d. In the second part of the experiment, the test subjects took the Jean Jouannic's colour blindness test and the X-Rite hue test online to test their general colour perception and the ability to differentiate similar hues. Later, the results of these tests were compared with the colours they determined using a colour chart to see if the discoveries correlate. The outcome of this experiment is presented in chapter 7.

    The workshop was concluded on the 25th of October at the Estonian Academy of Arts with a presentation and discussion of the initial results. Each research team presented their methods and findings, and there were general discussions about the accuracy and preservability of different methods in identifying and collecting historical colour information. The conclusions of the participants are summarised in chapter 8. Thereafter, the preliminary results of the colour determination experiment were revealed. Finally, all of the participants received a certificate for part-taking in the workshop and a tour of the Department of Cultural Heritage and Conservation was conducted for the international participants.

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  • Cripps, Helen
    et al.
    Singh, Abhay
    Mejtoft, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Salo, Jari
    The use of Twitter for innovation in business markets2020In: Marketing Intelligence & Planning, ISSN 0263-4503, E-ISSN 1758-8049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this research is to investigate the use of Twitter in business as a medium for knowledge sharing and to crowdsource information to support innovation and enhance business relationships in the context of business-to-business (B2B) marketing. Design/methodology/approach This study uses a combination of methodologies for gathering data in 52 face-to-face interviews across five countries and the downloaded posts from each of the interviewees' Twitter accounts. The tweets were analysed using structural topic modelling (STM), and then compared to the interview data. This method enabled triangulation between stated use of Twitter and respondent's actual tweets. Findings The research confirmed that individuals used Twitter as a source of information, ideas, promotion and innovation within their industry. Twitter facilitates building relevant business relationships through the exchange of new, expert and high-quality information within like-minded communities in real time, between companies and with their suppliers, customers and also their peers. Research limitations/implications - As this study covered five countries, further comparative research on the use of Twitter in the B2B context is called for. Further investigation of the formalisation of social media strategies and return on investment for social media marketing efforts is also warranted. Practical implications - This research highlights the business relationship building capacity of Twitter as it enables customer and peer conversations that eventually support the development of product and service innovations. Twitter has the capacity for marketers to informand engage customers and peers in their networks on wider topics thereby building the brand of the individual users and their companies simultaneously. Originality/value This study focuses on interactions at the individual level illustrating that Twitter is used for both customer and peer interactions that can lead to the sourcing of ideas, knowledge and ultimately innovation. The study is novel in its methodological approach of combining structured interviews and text mining that found the topics of the interviewees' tweets aligned with their interview responses.

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    et al.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Akmete, A.
    Middle East Tech Univ, Ankara, Turkey..
    Albanese, R.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia.;Consorzio CREATE, Naples, Italy..
    Alexandrov, A.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;PN Lebedev Phys Inst LPI RAS, Moscow, Russia.;Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    Anokhina, A.
    Moscow State Univ SINP MSU, Skobeltsyn Inst Nucl Phys, Moscow, Russia..
    Aoki, S.
    Kobe Univ, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan..
    Arduini, G.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Atkin, E.
    Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Azorskiy, N.
    Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna, Russia..
    Back, J. J.
    Univ Warwick, Warwick, England..
    Bagulya, A.
    PN Lebedev Phys Inst LPI RAS, Moscow, Russia..
    Dos Santos, F. Baaltasar
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Baranov, A.
    Yandex Sch Data Anal, Moscow, Russia..
    Bardou, F.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Barker, G. J.
    Univ Warwick, Warwick, England..
    Battistin, M.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Bauche, J.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Bay, A.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Bayliss, V
    STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab, Didcot, Oxon, England..
    Bencivenni, G.
    Lab Nazl INFN Frascati, Frascati, Italy..
    Berdnikov, A. Y.
    St Petersburg Polytech Univ SPbPU, St Petersburg, Russia..
    Berdnikov, Y. A.
    St Petersburg Polytech Univ SPbPU, St Petersburg, Russia..
    Bertani, M.
    Lab Nazl INFN Frascati, Frascati, Italy..
    Betancourt, C.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Bezshyiko, I
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Bezshyyko, O.
    Taras Shevchenko Natl Univ Kyiv, Kiev, Ukraine..
    Bick, D.
    Univ Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany..
    Bieschke, S.
    Univ Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany..
    Blanco, A.
    LIP Lab Instrumentat & Expt Particle Phys, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Boehm, J.
    STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab, Didcot, Oxon, England..
    Bogomilov, M.
    Sofia Univ, Fac Phys, Sofia, Bulgaria..
    Boiarska, I
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Bondarenko, K.
    Leiden Univ, Leiden, Netherlands.;CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Bonivento, W. M.
    Sez INFN Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy..
    Borburgh, J.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Boyarsky, A.
    Leiden Univ, Leiden, Netherlands.;Taras Shevchenko Natl Univ Kyiv, Kiev, Ukraine..
    Brenner, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Breton, D.
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Saclay, IN2P3, CNRS,LAL, Orsay, France..
    Buescher, V
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Mainz, Germany.;Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, PRISMA Cluster Excellence, Mainz, Germany..
    Buonaura, A.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Buontempo, S.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy..
    Cadeddu, S.
    Sez INFN Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy..
    Calcaterra, A.
    Lab Nazl INFN Frascati, Frascati, Italy..
    Calviani, M.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Campanelli, M.
    UCL, London, England..
    Casolino, M.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Charitonidis, N.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Chau, P.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Mainz, Germany.;Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, PRISMA Cluster Excellence, Mainz, Germany..
    Chauveau, J.
    Sorbonne Univ, Univ Paris Diderot, CNRS, IN2P3,LPNHE, F-75252 Paris, France..
    Chepurnov, A.
    Moscow State Univ SINP MSU, Skobeltsyn Inst Nucl Phys, Moscow, Russia..
    Chernyavskiy, M.
    PN Lebedev Phys Inst LPI RAS, Moscow, Russia..
    Choi, K-Y
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Suwon, Gyeong Gi Do, South Korea..
    Chumakov, A.
    Univ Tecn Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso, Chile.;Ctr Cient Tecnol Valparaiso, Valparaiso, Chile..
    Ciambrone, P.
    Lab Nazl INFN Frascati, Frascati, Italy..
    Cicero, V
    Sez INFN Bologna, Bologna, Italy..
    Congedo, L.
    Sez INFN Bari, Bari, Italy.;Univ Bari, Bari, Italy..
    Cornelis, K.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Cristinziani, M.
    Univ Bonn, Phys Inst, Bonn, Germany..
    Crupano, A.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    Dallavalle, G. M.
    Sez INFN Bologna, Bologna, Italy..
    Datwyler, A.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Zurich, Switzerland..
    D'Ambrosio, N.
    Lab Nazl INFN Gran Sasso, Laquila, Italy..
    D'Appollonio, G.
    Sez INFN Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.;Univ Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy..
    de Asmundis, R.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy..
    De Carvalho Saraiva, J.
    LIP Lab Instrumentat & Expt Particle Phys, Lisbon, Portugal..
    De Lellis, G.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia.;CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    de Magistris, M.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    De Roeck, A.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    De Serio, M.
    Sez INFN Bari, Bari, Italy.;Univ Bari, Bari, Italy..
    De Simone, D.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Dedenko, L.
    Moscow State Univ SINP MSU, Skobeltsyn Inst Nucl Phys, Moscow, Russia..
    Dergachev, P.
    Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia..
    Di Crescenzo, A.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    Di Giulio, L.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Di Marco, N.
    Lab Nazl INFN Gran Sasso, Laquila, Italy..
    Dib, C.
    Univ Tecn Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso, Chile.;Ctr Cient Tecnol Valparaiso, Valparaiso, Chile..
    Dijkstra, H.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Dmitrenko, V
    Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Dmitrievskiy, S.
    Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna, Russia..
    Dougherty, L. A.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Dolmatov, A.
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Inst Theoret & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia..
    Domenici, D.
    Lab Nazl INFN Frascati, Frascati, Italy..
    Donskov, S.
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Inst High Energy Phys, Protvino, Russia..
    Drohan, V
    Taras Shevchenko Natl Univ Kyiv, Kiev, Ukraine..
    Dubreuil, A.
    Univ Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Durhan, O.
    Middle East Tech Univ, Ankara, Turkey..
    Ehlert, M.
    Humboldt Univ, Berlin, Germany..
    Elikkaya, E.
    Middle East Tech Univ, Ankara, Turkey..
    Enik, T.
    Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna, Russia..
    Etenko, A.
    Kurchatov Inst, Natl Res Ctr, Moscow, Russia.;Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Fabbri, F.
    Sez INFN Bologna, Bologna, Italy..
    Fedin, O.
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Petersburg Nucl Phys Inst, Gatchina, Russia..
    Fedotovs, F.
    Imperial Coll London, London, England..
    Felici, G.
    Lab Nazl INFN Frascati, Frascati, Italy..
    Ferrillo, M.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Ferro-Luzzi, M.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Filippov, K.
    Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Fini, R. A.
    Sez INFN Bari, Bari, Italy..
    Fonte, P.
    LIP Lab Instrumentat & Expt Particle Phys, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Franco, C.
    LIP Lab Instrumentat & Expt Particle Phys, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Fraser, M.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Fresa, R.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Basilicata, Potenza, Italy..
    Froeschl, R.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Fukuda, T.
    Nagoya Univ, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Galati, G.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    Gall, J.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Gatignon, L.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Gavrilov, G.
    Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Gentile, V
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    Goddard, B.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Golinka-Bezshyyko, L.
    Taras Shevchenko Natl Univ Kyiv, Kiev, Ukraine..
    Golovatiuk, A.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    Golubkov, D.
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Inst Theoret & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia..
    Golutvin, A.
    Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia.;Imperial Coll London, London, England..
    Gorbounov, P.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Gorbunov, D.
    Russian Acad Sci INR RAS, Inst Nucl Res, Moscow, Russia..
    Gorbunov, S.
    PN Lebedev Phys Inst LPI RAS, Moscow, Russia..
    Gorkavenko, V
    Taras Shevchenko Natl Univ Kyiv, Kiev, Ukraine..
    Gorshenkov, M.
    Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia..
    Grachev, V
    Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Grandchamp, A. L.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Graverini, E.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Grenard, J-L
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Grenier, D.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Grichine, V
    PN Lebedev Phys Inst LPI RAS, Moscow, Russia..
    Gruzinskii, N.
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Petersburg Nucl Phys Inst, Gatchina, Russia..
    Guler, A. M.
    Middle East Tech Univ, Ankara, Turkey..
    Guz, Yu
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Inst High Energy Phys, Protvino, Russia..
    Haefeli, G. J.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Hagner, C.
    Univ Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany..
    Hakobyan, H.
    Univ Tecn Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso, Chile.;Ctr Cient Tecnol Valparaiso, Valparaiso, Chile..
    Harris, I. W.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    van Herwijnen, E.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Hessler, C.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Hollnagel, A.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Mainz, Germany.;Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, PRISMA Cluster Excellence, Mainz, Germany..
    Hosseini, B.
    Imperial Coll London, London, England..
    Hushchyn, M.
    Yandex Sch Data Anal, Moscow, Russia..
    Iaselli, G.
    Sez INFN Bari, Bari, Italy.;Univ Bari, Bari, Italy..
    Iuliano, A.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    Jacobsson, R.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Jokovic, D.
    Univ Belgrade, Inst Phys, Belgrade, Serbia..
    Jonker, M.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Kadenko, I
    Taras Shevchenko Natl Univ Kyiv, Kiev, Ukraine..
    Kain, V
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Kaiser, B.
    Univ Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany..
    Kamiscioglu, C.
    Ankara Univ, Ankara, Turkey..
    Karpenkov, D.
    Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia..
    Kershaw, K.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Khabibullin, M.
    Russian Acad Sci INR RAS, Inst Nucl Res, Moscow, Russia..
    Khalikov, E.
    Moscow State Univ SINP MSU, Skobeltsyn Inst Nucl Phys, Moscow, Russia..
    Khaustov, G.
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Inst High Energy Phys, Protvino, Russia..
    Khoriauli, G.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Mainz, Germany.;Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, PRISMA Cluster Excellence, Mainz, Germany..
    Khotyantsev, A.
    Russian Acad Sci INR RAS, Inst Nucl Res, Moscow, Russia..
    Kim, Y. G.
    Gwangju Natl Univ Educ, Gwangju, South Korea..
    Kim, V
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Petersburg Nucl Phys Inst, Gatchina, Russia.;St Petersburg Polytech Univ SPbPU, St Petersburg, Russia..
    Kitagawa, N.
    Nagoya Univ, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Ko, J-W
    Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Phys Educ Dept, Jinju, South Korea.;Gyeongsang Natl Univ, RINS, Jinju, South Korea..
    Kodama, K.
    Aichi Univ Educ, Kariya, Aichi, Japan..
    Kolesnikov, A.
    Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna, Russia..
    Kolev, D. , I
    Kolosov, V
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Inst High Energy Phys, Protvino, Russia..
    Komatsu, M.
    Nagoya Univ, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Kono, A.
    Toho Univ, Funabashi, Chiba, Japan..
    Konovalova, N.
    PN Lebedev Phys Inst LPI RAS, Moscow, Russia.;Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia..
    Kormannshaus, S.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Mainz, Germany.;Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, PRISMA Cluster Excellence, Mainz, Germany..
    Korol, I
    Humboldt Univ, Berlin, Germany..
    Korol'ko, I
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Inst Theoret & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia..
    Korzenev, A.
    Univ Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Kostyukhin, V
    Univ Bonn, Phys Inst, Bonn, Germany..
    Platia, E. Koukovini
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Kovalenko, S.
    Univ Tecn Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso, Chile.;Ctr Cient Tecnol Valparaiso, Valparaiso, Chile..
    Krasilnikova, I
    Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia..
    Kudenko, Y.
    Russian Acad Sci INR RAS, Inst Nucl Res, Moscow, Russia.;Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia.;MIPT, Moscow, Moscow Region, Russia..
    Kurbatov, E.
    Yandex Sch Data Anal, Moscow, Russia..
    Kurbatov, P.
    Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia..
    Kurochka, V
    Russian Acad Sci INR RAS, Inst Nucl Res, Moscow, Russia..
    Kuznetsova, E.
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Petersburg Nucl Phys Inst, Gatchina, Russia..
    Lacker, H. M.
    Humboldt Univ, Berlin, Germany..
    Lamont, M.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Lanfranchi, G.
    Lab Nazl INFN Frascati, Frascati, Italy..
    Lantwin, O.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Lauria, A.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    Lee, K. S.
    Korea Univ, Seoul, South Korea..
    Lee, K. Y.
    Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Phys Educ Dept, Jinju, South Korea.;Gyeongsang Natl Univ, RINS, Jinju, South Korea..
    Levy, J-M
    Sorbonne Univ, Univ Paris Diderot, CNRS, IN2P3,LPNHE, F-75252 Paris, France..
    Loschiavo, V. P.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Consorzio CREATE, Naples, Italy..
    Lopes, L.
    LIP Lab Instrumentat & Expt Particle Phys, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Sola, E. Lopez
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Lyubovitskij, V
    Univ Tecn Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso, Chile.;Ctr Cient Tecnol Valparaiso, Valparaiso, Chile..
    Maalmi, J.
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Saclay, IN2P3, CNRS,LAL, Orsay, France..
    Magnan, A.
    Imperial Coll London, London, England..
    Maleev, V
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Petersburg Nucl Phys Inst, Gatchina, Russia..
    Malinin, A.
    Kurchatov Inst, Natl Res Ctr, Moscow, Russia..
    Manabe, Y.
    Nagoya Univ, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Managadze, A. K.
    Moscow State Univ SINP MSU, Skobeltsyn Inst Nucl Phys, Moscow, Russia..
    Manfredi, M.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Marsh, S.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Marshall, A. M.
    Univ Bristol, HH Wills Phys Lab, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Mefodev, A.
    Russian Acad Sci INR RAS, Inst Nucl Res, Moscow, Russia..
    Mermod, P.
    Univ Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Miano, A.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    Mikado, S.
    Nihon Univ, Coll Ind Technol, Narashino, Chiba, Japan..
    Mikhaylov, Yu
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Inst High Energy Phys, Protvino, Russia..
    Milstead, D. A.
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mineev, O.
    Russian Acad Sci INR RAS, Inst Nucl Res, Moscow, Russia..
    Montanari, A.
    Sez INFN Bologna, Bologna, Italy..
    Montesi, M. C.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    Morishima, K.
    Nagoya Univ, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Movchan, S.
    Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna, Russia..
    Muttoni, Y.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Naganawa, N.
    Nagoya Univ, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Nakamura, M.
    Nagoya Univ, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Nakano, T.
    Nagoya Univ, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Nasybulin, S.
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Petersburg Nucl Phys Inst, Gatchina, Russia..
    Ninin, P.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Nishio, A.
    Nagoya Univ, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Novikov, A.
    Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Obinyakov, B.
    Kurchatov Inst, Natl Res Ctr, Moscow, Russia..
    Ogawa, S.
    Toho Univ, Funabashi, Chiba, Japan..
    Okateva, N.
    PN Lebedev Phys Inst LPI RAS, Moscow, Russia.;Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia..
    Opitz, B.
    Univ Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany..
    Osborne, J.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Ovchynnikov, M.
    Leiden Univ, Leiden, Netherlands.;Taras Shevchenko Natl Univ Kyiv, Kiev, Ukraine..
    Owtscharenko, N.
    Univ Bonn, Phys Inst, Bonn, Germany..
    Owen, P. H.
    Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Pacholek, P.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Paoloni, A.
    Lab Nazl INFN Frascati, Frascati, Italy..
    Park, B. D.
    Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Phys Educ Dept, Jinju, South Korea.;Gyeongsang Natl Univ, RINS, Jinju, South Korea..
    Pastore, A.
    Sez INFN Bari, Bari, Italy..
    Patel, M.
    Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia.;Imperial Coll London, London, England..
    Pereyma, D.
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Inst Theoret & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia..
    Perillo-Marcone, A.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Petkov, G. L.
    Sofia Univ, Fac Phys, Sofia, Bulgaria..
    Petridis, K.
    Univ Bristol, HH Wills Phys Lab, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Petrov, A.
    Kurchatov Inst, Natl Res Ctr, Moscow, Russia..
    Podgrudkov, D.
    Moscow State Univ SINP MSU, Skobeltsyn Inst Nucl Phys, Moscow, Russia..
    Poliakov, V
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Inst High Energy Phys, Protvino, Russia..
    Polukhina, N.
    PN Lebedev Phys Inst LPI RAS, Moscow, Russia.;Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia.;Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Prieto, J. Prieto
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Prokudin, M.
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Inst Theoret & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia..
    Prota, A.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    Quercia, A.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    Rademakers, A.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Rakai, A.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Ratnikov, F.
    Yandex Sch Data Anal, Moscow, Russia..
    Rawlings, T.
    STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab, Didcot, Oxon, England..
    Redi, F.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Ricciardi, S.
    STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab, Didcot, Oxon, England..
    Rinaldesi, M.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Rodin, Volodymyr
    Taras Shevchenko Natl Univ Kyiv, Kiev, Ukraine..
    Rodin, Viktor
    Taras Shevchenko Natl Univ Kyiv, Kiev, Ukraine..
    Robbe, P.
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Saclay, IN2P3, CNRS,LAL, Orsay, France..
    Cavalcante, A. B. Rodrigues
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Roganova, T.
    Moscow State Univ SINP MSU, Skobeltsyn Inst Nucl Phys, Moscow, Russia..
    Rokujo, H.
    Nagoya Univ, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Rosa, G.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    Rovelli, T.
    Sez INFN Bologna, Bologna, Italy.;Univ Bologna, Bologna, Italy..
    Ruchayskiy, O.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Ruf, T.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Samoylenko, V
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Inst High Energy Phys, Protvino, Russia..
    Samsonov, V
    Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Galan, F. Sanchez
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Diaz, P. Santos
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Ull, A. Sanz
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Saputi, A.
    Lab Nazl INFN Frascati, Frascati, Italy..
    Sato, O.
    Nagoya Univ, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Savchenko, E. S.
    Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia..
    Schliwinski, J. S.
    Humboldt Univ, Berlin, Germany..
    Schmidt-Parzefall, W.
    Univ Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany..
    Serra, N.
    Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia.;Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Sgobba, S.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Shadura, O.
    Taras Shevchenko Natl Univ Kyiv, Kiev, Ukraine..
    Shakin, A.
    Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia..
    Shaposhnikov, M.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Shatalov, P.
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Inst Theoret & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia.;Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia..
    Shchedrina, T.
    PN Lebedev Phys Inst LPI RAS, Moscow, Russia.;Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia..
    Shchutska, L.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Shevchenko, V
    Kurchatov Inst, Natl Res Ctr, Moscow, Russia.;Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia..
    Shibuya, H.
    Toho Univ, Funabashi, Chiba, Japan..
    Shihora, L.
    Humboldt Univ, Berlin, Germany..
    Shirobokov, S.
    Imperial Coll London, London, England..
    Shustov, A.
    Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Silverstein, S. B.
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Simone, S.
    Sez INFN Bari, Bari, Italy.;Univ Bari, Bari, Italy..
    Simoniello, R.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Mainz, Germany.;Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, PRISMA Cluster Excellence, Mainz, Germany..
    Skorokhvatov, M.
    Kurchatov Inst, Natl Res Ctr, Moscow, Russia.;Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Smirnov, S.
    Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Sohn, J. Y.
    Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Phys Educ Dept, Jinju, South Korea.;Gyeongsang Natl Univ, RINS, Jinju, South Korea..
    Sokolenko, A.
    Taras Shevchenko Natl Univ Kyiv, Kiev, Ukraine..
    Solodko, E.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Starkov, N.
    PN Lebedev Phys Inst LPI RAS, Moscow, Russia.;Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia..
    Stoel, L.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Stramaglia, M. E.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Sukhonos, D.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Suzuki, Y.
    Nagoya Univ, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Takahashi, S.
    Kobe Univ, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan..
    Tastet, J. L.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Teterin, P.
    Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Naing, S. Than
    PN Lebedev Phys Inst LPI RAS, Moscow, Russia..
    Timiryasov, I
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Tioukov, V
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy..
    Tommasini, D.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Torii, M.
    Nagoya Univ, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan..
    Tosi, N.
    Sez INFN Bologna, Bologna, Italy..
    Treille, D.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Tsenov, R.
    Sofia Univ, Fac Phys, Sofia, Bulgaria.;Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna, Russia..
    Ulin, S.
    Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Ursov, E.
    Moscow State Univ SINP MSU, Skobeltsyn Inst Nucl Phys, Moscow, Russia..
    Ustyuzhanin, A.
    Natl Univ Sci & Technol MISiS, Moscow, Russia.;Yandex Sch Data Anal, Moscow, Russia..
    Uteshev, Z.
    Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Vankova-Kirilova, G.
    Sofia Univ, Fac Phys, Sofia, Bulgaria..
    Vannucci, F.
    Sorbonne Univ, Univ Paris Diderot, CNRS, IN2P3,LPNHE, F-75252 Paris, France..
    Venturi, V.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Vilchinski, S.
    Taras Shevchenko Natl Univ Kyiv, Kiev, Ukraine..
    Vincke, Heinz
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Vincke, Helmut
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Visone, C.
    Sez INFN Napoli, Naples, Italy.;Univ Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Jinju, South Korea. PNPI, Gatchina, Russia..
    Vlasik, K.
    Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Moscow, Russia..
    Volkov, A.
    PN Lebedev Phys Inst LPI RAS, Moscow, Russia.;Kurchatov Inst, Natl Res Ctr, Moscow, Russia..
    Voronkov, R.
    PN Lebedev Phys Inst LPI RAS, Moscow, Russia..
    van Waasen, S.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany..
    Wanke, R.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Mainz, Germany.;Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, PRISMA Cluster Excellence, Mainz, Germany..
    Wertelaers, P.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Williams, O.
    CERN, European Org Nucl Res, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Woo, J-K
    Jeju Natl Univ, Jeju, South Korea..
    Wurm, M.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Mainz, Germany.;Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, PRISMA Cluster Excellence, Mainz, Germany..
    Xella, S.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Yilmaz, D.
    Ankara Univ, Ankara, Turkey..
    Yilmazer, A. U.
    Ankara Univ, Ankara, Turkey..
    Yoon, C. S.
    Gyeongsang Natl Univ, Phys Educ Dept, Jinju, South Korea.;Gyeongsang Natl Univ, RINS, Jinju, South Korea..
    Zaytsev, Yu
    NRC Kurchatov Inst, Inst Theoret & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia..
    Zimmerman, J.
    Humboldt Univ, Berlin, Germany..
    Measurement of the muon flux from 400 GeV/c protons interacting in a thick molybdenum/tungsten target2020In: European Physical Journal C, ISSN 1434-6044, E-ISSN 1434-6052, Vol. 80, no 3, article id 284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The SHiP experiment is proposed to search for very weakly interacting particles beyond the Standard Model which are produced in a 400 GeV/c proton beam dump at the CERN SPS. About 1011muons per spill will be produced in the dump. To design the experiment such that the muon-induced background is minimized, a precise knowledge of the muon spectrum is required. To validate the muon flux generated by our Pythia and GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulation (FairShip), we have measured the muon flux emanating from a SHiP-like target at the SPS. This target, consisting of 13 interaction lengths of slabs of molybdenum and tungsten, followed by a 2.4 m iron hadron absorber was placed in the H4 400 GeV/c proton beam line. To identify muons and to measure the momentum spectrum, a spectrometer instrumented with drift tubes and a muon tagger were used. During a 3-week period a dataset for analysis corresponding to (3.27 +/- 0.07)x1011protons on target was recorded. This amounts to approximatively 1% of a SHiP spill.

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  • Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Josefsson, Karin
    Hoglind, Sten
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Associations between physical activity and core affects within and across days: a daily diary study2020In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to investigate (a) if daily physical activity at the within-person level is related to four different core affects the same evening, (b) if core affects in the evening predict physical activity the following day, and (c) if physical activity predicts core affects the following day. Design: A total of 166 university students were asked to complete the affect and physical activity measures once a day (in the evening), for seven days. Bivariate unconditional latent curve model analyses with structured residuals were performed to investigate the relations within days and across days between the core affects and physical activity. Main outcome measures: Core affects and physical activity. Results: Physical activity had positive within-day associations with pleasant-activated and pleasant-deactivated core affects and a negative within-day association with unpleasant-deactivated affective responses. There were, however, no statistically significant relations between core affects and physical activity across days. Conclusion: These results highlight that the measurement interval might be an important factor that influences the association between core affects and physical activity behaviors.

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