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  • Jalilzadehazhari, Elaheh
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Vadiee, Amir
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    The profitability of various energy supply systems considering variations in future climate conditions2019In: International Conference on Applied Energy (ICAE 2019). August 12-15, Västerås, Sweden, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ambitious targets were set in Sweden to increase the share of renewable energy resources and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Renovating old detached houses can assist in achieving the abovementioned targets, since they make up a great share of the final energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in Sweden. Although, several attempts were taken to improve the energy performance of the detached houses, the implementation of energy efficient renovation is yet low due to mainly high investment cost. Former studies evaluated the cost effectiveness of various energy efficient renovations in renovating detached houses in Sweden, but they provided no information how possible climate futures affect the determination and adoption of energy efficiency policies, such as monetary instruments. Accordingly, this study considered three distinct energy renovation packages and analyzed the subsidies required for implementing renovation packages for given interest rates and lifetimes. Furthermore, three different climate scenarios were considered to analyze the effect of possible climate futures on subsidies required. The analyses of results show that increasing the lifetime have greater impact on required subsidies than increasing the interest rate. Furthermore, the results show that variation in future climate conditions changes the required subsidies when implementing energy efficiency renovations. Results can be used as an aid when adopting energy efficiency policies. 

  • Syssner, Josefina
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies – CKS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Varför längtar vi till skogen?2018Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    VARFÖR LÄNGTAR VI TILL SKOGEN? är en bildsvit och en samling röster om skogen. Här förenas längtan efter fjällskogar, myrmarker och nordisk blandskog med längtan efter lugn och stillhet, samhörighet och frihet, rörelseglädje, adrenalin och arbetsvilja. I boken ger jägare, skogsbrukare, orienterare, naturguider och andra med skogen i hjärtat sina personliga perspektiv på just skog. Josefina Syssner fångar skogens mångfald och föränderlighet i enkla och stundtals naivistiska teckningar i blyerts och tusch.

    JOSEFINA SYSSNER är forskare och författare. Hon har gett ut tre monografier, varit redaktör för sex antologier och publicerat en lång rad vetenskapliga artiklar och rapporter. Syssner har varit forskningsledare i flera stora forskningsprojekt och är en flitigt anlitad föreläsare. Hennes forskning handlar framförallt om lokal utveckling, politik och planering och om landsbygdens framtid. I den här boken publicerar hon för första gången ut en del av sin omfattande bildproduktion - en bildsvit om skogen i blyerts och tusch.

  • Mansouri, Masoumeh
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lacerda, Bruno
    Oxford Robotics Institute, University of Oxford, UK.
    Hawes, Nick
    Oxford Robotics Institute, University of Oxford, UK.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Multi-Robot Planning Under Uncertain Travel Times and Safety Constraints2019In: Proceedings of the Twenty-Eighth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI-19), 2019, p. 478-484Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a novel modelling and planning approach for multi-robot systems under uncertain travel times. The approach uses generalised stochastic Petri nets (GSPNs) to model desired team behaviour, and allows to specify safety constraints and rewards. The GSPN is interpreted as a Markov decision process (MDP) for which we can generate policies that optimise the requirements. This representation is more compact than the equivalent multi-agent MDP, allowing us to scale better. Furthermore, it naturally allows for asynchronous execution of the generated policies across the robots, yielding smoother team behaviour. We also describe how the integration of the GSPN with a lower-level team controller allows for accurate expectations on team performance. We evaluate our approach on an industrial scenario, showing that it outperforms hand-crafted policies used in current practice.

  • Vorobyeva, Anzhelika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Schulga, Alexey
    Russian Acad Sci, Shemyakin & Ovchinnikov Inst Bioorgan Chem, Mol Immunol Lab, Moscow, Russia.
    Konovalova, Elena
    Russian Acad Sci, Shemyakin & Ovchinnikov Inst Bioorgan Chem, Mol Immunol Lab, Moscow, Russia.
    Guler, Rezan
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Dept Prot Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lofblom, John
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Dept Prot Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Garousi, Javad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Chernov, Vladimir
    Russian Acad Sci, Tomsk Natl Res Med Ctr, Canc Res Inst, Nucl Med Dept, Tomsk, Russia.
    Bragina, Olga
    Russian Acad Sci, Tomsk Natl Res Med Ctr, Canc Res Inst, Nucl Med Dept, Tomsk, Russia.
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Theranostics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Deyev, Sergey M.
    Russian Acad Sci, Shemyakin & Ovchinnikov Inst Bioorgan Chem, Mol Immunol Lab, Moscow, Russia;Natl Res Tomsk Polytech Univ, Tomsk, Russia;Natl Res Nucl Univ MEPhI, Inst Engn Phys Biomed PhysBio, Bionanophoton Lab, Moscow, Russia.
    Optimal composition and position of histidine-containing tags improves biodistribution of Tc-99m-labeled DARP in G32019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 9405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radionuclide molecular imaging of HER2 expression in disseminated cancer enables stratification of patients for HER2-targeted therapies. DARP in G3, a small (14 kDa) engineered scaffold protein, is a promising probe for imaging of HER2. We hypothesized that position (C- or N-terminus) and composition (hexahistidine or (HE)(3)) of histidine-containing tags would influence the biodistribution of [Tc-99m]Tc(CO)(3)-labeled DARP in G3. To test the hypothesis, G3 variants containing tags at N-terminus (H-6-G3 and (HE)(3)-G3) or at C-terminus (G3-H-6 and G3-(HE)(3)) were labeled with [Tc-99m]Tc(CO)(3). Labeling yield, label stability, specificity and affinity of the binding to HER2, biodistribution and tumor targeting properties of these variants were compared side-by-side. There was no substantial influence of position and composition of the tags on binding of [Tc-99m]Tc(CO)(3)-labeled variants to HER2. The specificity of HER2 targeting in vivo was confirmed. The tumor uptake in BALB/c nu/nu mice bearing SKOV3 xenografts was similar for all variants. On the opposite, there was a strong influence of the tags on uptake in normal tissues. The tumor-to-liver ratio for [Tc-99m]Tc(CO)(3)-(HE)(3)-G3 was three-fold higher compared to the hexahistidine-tag containing variants. Overall, [Tc-99m]Tc(CO)(3)-(HE)(3)-G3 variant provided the highest tumor-to-lung, tumor-to-liver, tumor-to-bone and tumor-to-muscle ratios, which should improve sensitivity of HER2 imaging in these common metastatic sites.

  • Bastani, Spencer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Fiscal Studies. Linnaeus Univ, Dept Econ & Stat, Vaxjo, Sweden;Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Integrat & Discriminat Studies, Vaxjo, Sweden;Uppsala Ctr Labor Studies, Uppsala, Sweden;CESifo, Munich, Germany.
    Blomquist, Sören
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Fiscal Studies.
    Micheletto, Luca
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Fiscal Studies. CESifo, Munich, Germany;Univ Milan, Dept Law, Milan, Italy;Bocconi Univ, Dondena Ctr Res Social Dynam, Milan, Italy.
    Nonlinear and piecewise linear income taxation, and the subsidization of work-related goods2019In: International Tax and Public Finance, ISSN 0927-5940, E-ISSN 1573-6970, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 806-834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate how the social welfare gain of subsidizing work-related goods depends on whether the underlying income tax system is linear, piecewise linear or fully nonlinear, focusing on child care services as a paradigmatic example of goods/services that are complements with labor supply. Our quantitative analysis employs an empirically relevant labor supply model and shows that the welfare gain of an optimally chosen subsidy is negligible when the optimal income tax is restricted to be linear but about the same as under fully nonlinear taxation when the optimal income tax is restricted to be piecewise linear. Our findings enhance the policy relevance of the optimal tax argument in favor of providing subsidies to work-related goods and also shed light on the relative welfare gains of employing piecewise linear rather than fully nonlinear income taxes.

  • Lindberg, Terese
    et al.
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden;Blekinge Ctr Competence, Karlskrona, Sweden;Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden.
    Wimo, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elmstahl, Solve
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden.
    Qiu, Chengxuan
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bohman, Doris M.
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Berglund, Johan Sanmartin
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden;Blekinge Ctr Competence, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Prevalence and Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation and Other Arrhythmias in the General Older Population: Findings From the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care2019In: Gerontology and geriatric medicine, E-ISSN 2333-7214, Vol. 5, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study the prevalence and cumulative incidence of arrhythmias in the general population of adults aged 60 and older over a 6-year period. Study Design and Setting: Data were taken from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care (SNAC), a national, longitudinal, multidisciplinary study of the general elderly population (defined as 60 years of age or older). A 12-lead resting electrocardiography (ECG) was performed at baseline and 6-year follow-up. Results: The baseline prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) was 4.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = [4.5%, 5.5%]), and other arrhythmias including ventricular premature complexes (VPCs), supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), and supraventricular extrasystole (SVES) were seen in 8.4% (7.7%, 9.0%) of the population. A first- or second-degree atrioventricular (AV) block was found in 7.1% of the population (95% CI = [6.5%, 7.7%]), and there were no significant differences between men and women in baseline arrhythmia prevalence. The 6-year cumulative incidence of AF was 4.1% (95% CI = [3.5%, 4.9%]), or 6.9/1,000 person-years (py; 95% CI = [5.7, 8.0]). The incidence of AF, other arrhythmias, AV block, and pacemaker-induced rhythm was significantly higher in men in all cohorts except for the oldest. Conclusion: Our data highlight the prevalence and incidence of arrhythmias, which rapidly increase with advancing age in the general population.

  • Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Hartmann, Jens
    Univ Hamburg, Ctr Earth Syst Res & Sustainabil CEN, Inst Geol, Bundesstr 55, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany.
    Hessen, Dag O.
    Univ Oslo, CBA, Dept Biosci, Box 1066, N-0316 Blindern, Norway.
    Kopacek, Jiri
    CAS, Biol Ctr, Inst Hydrobiol, Na Sadkach 7, Ceske Budejovice 37005, Czech Republic.
    Hejzlar, Josef
    CAS, Biol Ctr, Inst Hydrobiol, Na Sadkach 7, Ceske Budejovice 37005, Czech Republic.
    Jacquet, Stephan
    INRA CARRTEL, 75 Bis Ave Corzent, F-74203 Thonon Les Bains, CX, France.
    Hamilton, Stephen K.
    Michigan State Univ, Kellogg Biol Stn, Hickory Corners, MI 49060 USA;Michigan State Univ, Dept Integrat Biol, Hickory Corners, MI 49060 USA;Cary Inst Ecosyst Studies, Millbrook, NY 12545 USA.
    Verburg, Piet
    Natl Inst Water & Atmospher Res, Hamilton, New Zealand.
    Leach, Taylor H.
    Rensselaer Polytech Inst, Dept Biol Sci, Troy, NY 12180 USA.
    Schmid, Martin
    Eawag Swiss Fed Inst Aquat Sci & Technol, Surface Waters Res & Management, Seestr 79, CH-6047 Kastanienbaum, Switzerland.
    Flaim, Giovanna
    Fdn Edmund Mach, Res & Innovat Ctr, Dept Sustainable Agroecosyst & Bioresources, Via E Mach 1, I-38010 San Michele All Adige, Italy.
    Nöges, Tiina
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Agr & Environm Sci, Kreutzwaldi 5, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Nöges, Peeter
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Agr & Environm Sci, Kreutzwaldi 5, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Wentzky, Valerie C.
    Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Dept Lake Res, Magdeburg, Germany;Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Dept Aquat Ecosyst Anal, Magdeburg, Germany.
    Rogora, Michela
    CNR Water Res Inst, Lgo Tonolli 50, I-28922 Verbania, Italy.
    Rusak, James A.
    Dorset Environm Sci Ctr, Dorset, ON P0A 1E0, Canada.
    Kosten, Sarian
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Inst Water & Wetland Res, Dept Aquat Ecol & Environm Biol, NL-6525 AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Paterson, Andrew M.
    Dorset Environm Sci Ctr, Dorset, ON P0A 1E0, Canada.
    Teubner, Katrin
    Univ Vienna, Dept Limnol & Biol Oceanog, Althanstr 14, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.
    Higgins, Scott N.
    IISD Expt Lakes Area Inc, 111 Lombard Ave Suite 325, Winnipeg, MB R3B 0T5, Canada.
    Lawrence, Gregory
    US Geol Survey, NewYork Water Sci Ctr, Troy, NY 12180 USA.
    Kangur, Kulli
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Agr & Environm Sci, Ctr Limnol, EE-51117 Tartu, Estonia.
    Kokorite, Ilga
    Univ Latvia, Inst Biol, Miera Str 3, LV-2169 Salaspils, Latvia.
    Cerasino, Leonardo
    Fdn Edmund Mach, Res & Innovat Ctr, Dept Sustainable Agroecosyst & Bioresources, Via E Mach 1, I-38010 San Michele All Adige, Italy.
    Funk, Clara
    US Environm Protect Agcy, Clean Air Markets Div, Washington, DC 20460 USA.
    Harvey, Rebecca
    Vermont Dept Environm Serv, 1 Natl Life Dr, Montpelier, VT USA.
    Moatar, Florentina
    Irstea, 5 Rue Doua, F-69625 Villeurbanne, France.
    de Wit, Heleen A.
    Norwegian Inst Water Res, Gaustadalleen 23, NO-0349 Oslo, Norway.
    Zechmeister, Thomas
    Biol Stn Lake Neusiedl, A-7142 Illmitz, Austria.
    Widespread diminishing anthropogenic effects on calcium in freshwaters2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 10450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calcium (Ca) is an essential element for almost all living organisms. Here, we examined global variation and controls of freshwater Ca concentrations, using 440 599 water samples from 43 184 inland water sites in 57 countries. We found that the global median Ca concentration was 4.0 mg L-1 with 20.7% of the water samples showing Ca concentrations <= 1.5 mg L-1, a threshold considered critical for the survival of many Ca-demanding organisms. Spatially, freshwater Ca concentrations were strongly and proportionally linked to carbonate alkalinity, with the highest Ca and carbonate alkalinity in waters with a pH around 8.0 and decreasing in concentrations towards lower pH. However, on a temporal scale, by analyzing decadal trends in > 200 water bodies since the 1980s, we observed a frequent decoupling between carbonate alkalinity and Ca concentrations, which we attributed mainly to the influence of anthropogenic acid deposition. As acid deposition has been ameliorated, in many freshwaters carbonate alkalinity concentrations have increased or remained constant, while Ca concentrations have rapidly declined towards or even below pre-industrial conditions as a consequence of recovery from anthropogenic acidification. Thus, a paradoxical outcome of the successful remediation of acid deposition is a globally widespread freshwater Ca concentration decline towards critically low levels for many aquatic organisms.

  • Abou-Zeid, M.
    et al.
    Georg August Univ Gottingen, SUB, Pl Gottinger Sieben 1, D-37073 Gottingen, Germany.
    Hull, C. M.
    Imperial Coll London, Blackett Lab, Theory Grp, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Lindström, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Physics. Imperial Coll London, Blackett Lab, Theory Grp, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.
    Rocek, M.
    SUNY Stony Brook, CN Yang Inst Theoret Phys, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA.
    T-duality in (2,1) superspace2019In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 6, article id 138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We find the T-duality transformation rules for 2-dimensional (2,1) supersymmetric sigma-models in (2,1) superspace. Our results clarify certain aspects of the (2,1) sigma model geometry relevant to the discussion of T-duality. The complexified duality transformations we find are equivalent to the usual Buscher duality transformations (including an important refinement) together with diffeomorphisms. We use the gauging of sigma-models in (2,1) superspace, which we review and develop, finding a manifestly real and geometric expression for the gauged action. We discuss the obstructions to gauging (2,1) sigma-models, and find that the obstructions to (2,1) T-duality are considerably weaker.

  • Arabi Ardehali, Arash
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Physics. Inst Res Fundamental Sci IPM, Sch Phys, POB 19395-5531, Tehran, Iran.
    Cardy-like asymptotics of the 4d N=4 index and AdS(5) blackholes2019In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 6, article id 134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Choi, Kim, Kim, and Nahmgoong have recently pioneered analyzing a Cardy-like limit of the superconformal index of the 4d N=4 theory with complexified fugacities which encodes the entropy of the dual supersymmetric AdS(5) blackholes. Here we study the Cardy-like asymptotics of the index within the rigorous framework of elliptic hypergeometric integrals, thereby filling a gap in their derivation of the blackhole entropy function, finding a new blackhole saddle-point, and demonstrating novel bifurcation phenomena in the asymptotics of the index as a function of fugacity phases. We also comment on the relevance of the supersymmetric Casimir energy to the blackhole entropy function in the present context.

  • Towner, Jamie
    et al.
    Univ Reading, Dept Geog & Environm Sci, Reading RG6 6AB, Berks, England.
    Cloke, Hannah L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Univ Reading, Dept Geog & Environm Sci, Reading RG6 6AB, Berks, England;Univ Reading, Dept Meteorol, Reading RG6 6BB, Berks, England;CNDS, Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zsoter, Ervin
    Univ Reading, Dept Geog & Environm Sci, Reading RG6 6AB, Berks, England;European Ctr Medium Range Weather Forecasts, Shinfield Pk, Reading RG6 9AX, Berks, England.
    Flamig, Zachary
    Univ Chicago, Ctr Data Intens Sci, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Hoch, Jannis M.
    Univ Utrecht, Dept Phys Geog, POB 80115, NL-3508 TC Utrecht, Netherlands;POB 177, NL-2600 MH Delft, Netherlands.
    Bazo, Juan
    Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Ctr, NL-2521 CV The Hague, Netherlands;UTP, Lima, Peru.
    de Perez, Erin Coughlan
    Columbia Univ, Int Res Inst Climate & Soc, Palisades, NY 10964 USA;Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Ctr, NL-2521 CV The Hague, Netherlands.
    Stephens, Elisabeth M.
    Univ Reading, Dept Geog & Environm Sci, Reading RG6 6AB, Berks, England.
    Assessing the performance of global hydrological models for capturing peak river flows in the Amazon basin2019In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, ISSN 1027-5606, E-ISSN 1607-7938, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 3057-3080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extreme flooding impacts millions of people that live within the Amazon floodplain. Global hydrological models (GHMs) are frequently used to assess and inform the management of flood risk, but knowledge on the skill of available models is required to inform their use and development. This paper presents an intercomparison of eight different GHMs freely available from collaborators of the Global Flood Partnership (GFP) for simulating floods in the Amazon basin. To gain insight into the strengths and shortcomings of each model, we assess their ability to reproduce daily and annual peak river flows against gauged observations at 75 hydrological stations over a 19-year period (1997-2015). As well as highlighting regional variability in the accuracy of simulated streamflow, these results indicate that (a) the meteorological input is the dominant control on the accuracy of both daily and annual maximum river flows, and (b) ground-water and routing calibration of Lisflood based on daily river flows has no impact on the ability to simulate flood peaks for the chosen river basin. These findings have important relevance for applications of large-scale hydrological models, including analysis of the impact of climate variability, assessment of the influence of long-term changes such as land-use and anthropogenic climate change, the assessment of flood likelihood, and for flood forecasting systems.

  • Lona-Durazo, Frida
    et al.
    Univ Toronto, Dept Anthropol, Hlth Sci Complex,Room 352, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6, Canada.
    Hernandez-Pacheco, Natalia
    Univ La Laguna, Res Unit, Hosp Univ NS de Candelaria, Santa Cruz De Tenerife, Spain;Univ La Laguna, Genom & Hlth Grp, Dept Biochem Microbiol Cell Biol & Genet, Tenerife, Spain.
    Fan, Shaohua
    Univ Penn, Dept Genet, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Zhang, Tongwu
    NCI, Lab Translat Genom, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Choi, Jiyeon
    NCI, Lab Translat Genom, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Kovacs, Michael A.
    NCI, Lab Translat Genom, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Loftus, Stacie K.
    NHGRI, Genet Dis Res Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Le, Phuong
    Edwards, Melissa
    Univ Toronto, Dept Anthropol, Hlth Sci Complex,Room 352, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6, Canada.
    Fortes-Lima, Cesar A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution. Univ Paris Diderot, Evolutionary Anthropol Team, Lab Ecoanthropol & Ethnobiol UMR7206, CNRS,MNHN,Musee Homme, Paris, France.
    Eng, Celeste
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Bioengn & Therapeut Sci, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Huntsman, Scott
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Bioengn & Therapeut Sci, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Hu, Donglei
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Bioengn & Therapeut Sci, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Javier Gomez-Cabezas, Enrique
    Ctr Sociol & Psychol Res, Havana, Cuba.
    Caridad Marin-Padron, Lilia
    Med Univ Havana, Natl Ctr Med Genet, Havana, Cuba.
    Grauholm, Jonas
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Congenital Disorders, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mors, Ole
    Aarhus Univ, Translat Neuropsychiat Unit, Dept Clin Med, Aarhus, Denmark;Aarhus Univ, Lundbeck Fdn Initiat Integrat Psychiat Res, Aarhus, Denmark;Aarhus Univ Hosp, Psychiat Dept, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Burchard, Esteban G.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Bioengn & Therapeut Sci, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Norton, Heather L.
    Univ Cincinnati, Dept Anthropol, Cincinnati, OH USA.
    Pavan, William J.
    NHGRI, Genet Dis Res Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Brown, Kevin M.
    NCI, Lab Translat Genom, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Tishkoff, Sarah
    Univ Penn, Dept Genet, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA;Univ Penn, Dept Biol, Sch Arts & Sci, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Pino-Yanes, Maria
    Univ La Laguna, Genom & Hlth Grp, Dept Biochem Microbiol Cell Biol & Genet, Tenerife, Spain;Inst Salud Carlos III, CIBER Enfermedades Resp, Madrid, Spain;Univ La Laguna, ITB, Santa Cruz De Tenerife, Spain.
    Beleza, Sandra
    Univ Leicester, Dept Genet & Genome Biol, Coll Life Sci, Leicester, Leics, England.
    Marcheco-Teruel, Beatriz
    Med Univ Havana, Natl Ctr Med Genet, Havana, Cuba.
    Parra, Esteban J.
    Univ Toronto, Dept Anthropol, Hlth Sci Complex,Room 352, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6, Canada.
    Meta-analysis of GWA studies provides new insights on the genetic architecture of skin pigmentation in recently admixed populations2019In: BMC Genetics, ISSN 1471-2156, E-ISSN 1471-2156, Vol. 20, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Association studies in recently admixed populations are extremely useful to identify the genetic architecture of pigmentation, due to their high genotypic and phenotypic variation. However, to date only four Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have been carried out in these populations.

    Results: We present a GWAS of skin pigmentation in an admixed sample from Cuba (N=762). Additionally, we conducted a meta-analysis including the Cuban sample, and admixed samples from Cape Verde, Puerto Rico and African-Americans from San Francisco. This meta-analysis is one of the largest efforts so far to characterize the genetic basis of skin pigmentation in admixed populations (N=2,104). We identified five genome-wide significant regions in the meta-analysis, and explored if the markers observed in these regions are associated with the expression of relevant pigmentary genes in human melanocyte cultures. In three of the regions identified in the meta-analysis (SLC24A5, SLC45A2, and GRM5/TYR), the association seems to be driven by non-synonymous variants (rs1426654, rs16891982, and rs1042602, respectively). The rs16891982 polymorphism is strongly associated with the expression of the SLC45A2 gene. In the GRM5/TYR region, in addition to the rs1042602 non-synonymous SNP located on the TYR gene, variants located in the nearby GRM5 gene have an independent effect on pigmentation, possibly through regulation of gene expression of the TYR gene. We also replicated an association recently described near the MFSD12 gene on chromosome 19 (lead variant rs112332856). Additionally, our analyses support the presence of multiple signals in the OCA2/HERC2/APBA2 region on chromosome 15. A clear causal candidate is the HERC2 intronic variant rs12913832, which has a profound influence on OCA2 expression. This variant has pleiotropic effects on eye, hair, and skin pigmentation. However, conditional and haplotype-based analyses indicate the presence of other variants with independent effects on melanin levels in OCA2 and APBA2. Finally, a follow-up of genome-wide signals identified in a recent GWAS for tanning response indicates that there is a substantial overlap in the genetic factors influencing skin pigmentation and tanning response.

    Conclusions: Our meta-analysis of skin pigmentation GWAS in recently admixed populations provides new insights about the genetic architecture of this complex trait.

  • Urban, Philip
    et al.
    La Tour Hosp, Geneva, Switzerland;Cardiovasc European Res Ctr, Massy, France.
    Mehran, Roxana
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, New York, NY 10029 USA.
    Colleran, Roisin
    Tech Univ Munich, Deutsch Herzzentrum Munchen, Munich, Germany.
    Angiolillo, Dominick J.
    Univ Florida, Coll Med, Div Cardiol, Jacksonville, FL USA.
    Byrne, Robert A.
    Tech Univ Munich, Deutsch Herzzentrum Munchen, Munich, Germany.
    Capodanno, Davide
    Ctr Alte Specialita & Trapianti, Cardiothorac Vasc Dept, Catania, Italy;Univ Catania, Azienda Osped Univ Vittorio Emanuele Policlin, Catania, Italy.
    Cuisset, Thomas
    Ctr Hosp Univ Timone, Dept Cardiol, Marseille, France;Aix Marseille Univ, Fac Med, Ctr Rech Cardiovasc & Nutr, Inserm,Inra, Marseille, France.
    Cutlip, Donald
    Harvard Med Sch, Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiol Div, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Eerdmans, Pedro
    DEKRA Certificat BV, Notified Body, Boston, MA USA.
    Eikelboom, John
    McMaster Univ, Dept Med, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Farb, Andrew
    US FDA, Silver Spring, MD USA.
    Gibson, C. Michael
    Baim Inst Clin Res, Brookline, MA USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Gregson, John
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, London, England.
    Haude, Michael
    Lukaskrankenhaus GmbH, Stadt Kliniken Neuss, Neuss, Germany.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Kim, Hyo-Soo
    Seoul Natl Univ Hosp, Cardiovasc Ctr, Seoul, South Korea.
    Kimura, Takeshi
    Kyoto Univ, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Grad Sch Med, Kyoto, Japan.
    Konishi, Akihide
    Pharmaceut & Med Devices Agcy, Off Med Devices 1, Tokyo, Japan.
    Laschinger, John
    US FDA, Silver Spring, MD USA.
    Leon, Martin B.
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, New York, NY USA;Cardiovasc Res Fdn, New York, NY USA.
    Magee, P. F. Adrian
    US FDA, Silver Spring, MD USA.
    Mitsutake, Yoshiaki
    Pharmaceut & Med Devices Agcy, Off Med Devices 1, Tokyo, Japan.
    Mylotte, Darren
    Univ Hosp, Galway, Ireland;Natl Univ Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
    Pocock, Stuart
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, London, England.
    Price, Matthew J.
    Scripps Clin, La Jolla, CA 92037 USA.
    Rao, Sunil V.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA.
    Spitzer, Ernest
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Thoraxctr, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Cardialysis Clin Trial Management & Core Labs, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Stockbridge, Norman
    US FDA, Silver Spring, MD USA.
    Valgimigli, Marco
    Univ Bern, Dept Cardiol, Inselspital, Bern, Switzerland.
    Varenne, Olivier
    Hop Cochin, AP HP, Serv Cardiol, Paris, France;Univ Paris 05, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, France.
    Windhoevel, Ute
    Cardiovasc European Res Ctr, Massy, France.
    Yeh, Robert W.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Krucoff, Mitchell W.
    Duke Clin Res Inst, Durham, NC USA;Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Durham, NC USA.
    Morice, Marie-Claude
    Cardiovasc European Res Ctr, Massy, France.
    Defining High Bleeding Risk in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A Consensus Document From the Academic Research Consortium for High Bleeding Risk2019In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 140, no 3, p. 240-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identification and management of patients at high bleeding risk undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention are of major importance, but a lack of standardization in defining this population limits trial design, data interpretation, and clinical decision-making. The Academic Research Consortium for High Bleeding Risk (ARC-HBR) is a collaboration among leading research organizations, regulatory authorities, and physician-scientists from the United States, Asia, and Europe focusing on percutaneous coronary intervention-related bleeding. Two meetings of the 31-member consortium were held in Washington, DC, in April 2018 and in Paris, France, in October 2018. These meetings were organized by the Cardiovascular European Research Center on behalf of the ARC-HBR group and included representatives of the US Food and Drug Administration and the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, as well as observers from the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. A consensus definition of patients at high bleeding risk was developed that was based on review of the available evidence. The definition is intended to provide consistency in defining this population for clinical trials and to complement clinical decision-making and regulatory review. The proposed ARC-HBR consensus document represents the first pragmatic approach to a consistent definition of high bleeding risk in clinical trials evaluating the safety and effectiveness of devices and drug regimens for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

  • Ny, Sofia
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Microbiol, Alfred Nobels Alle 10, S-14152 Stockholm, Sweden;Publ Hlth Agcy Sweden, Nobels Vag 18, S-17182 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandegren, Linus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Salemi, Marco
    Univ Florida, Dept Pathol, Emerging Pathogens Inst, POB 100009, Gainesville, FL 32610 USA.
    Giske, Christian G.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Microbiol, Alfred Nobels Alle 10, S-14152 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Genome and plasmid diversity of Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase-producing Escherichia coli ST131-tracking phylogenetic trajectories with Bayesian inference2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 10291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clonal lineages of ESBL (Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase)-producing E. coli belonging to sequence type 131 (ST131) have disseminated globally during the last 30 years, leading to an increased prevalence of resistance to fluoroquinolones and extended-spectrum cephalosporins in clinical isolates of E. coli. We aimed to study if Swedish ESBL-producing ST131 isolates originated from single or multiple introductions to the population by assessing the amount of genetic variation, on chromosomal and plasmid level, between Swedish and international E. coli ST131. Bayesian inference of Swedish E. coli ST131 isolates (n = 29), sequenced using PacBio RSII, together with an international ST131 dataset showed that the Swedish isolates were part of the international ST131 A, C1 and C2 clades. Highly conserved plasmids were identified in three clusters although they were separated by several years, which indicates a strong co-evolution between some ST131 lineages and specific plasmids. In conclusion, the tight clonal relationship observed within the ST131 clades, together with highly conserved plasmids, challenges investigation of strain transmission events. A combination of few SNPs on a genome-wide scale and an epidemiological temporospatial link, are needed to track the spread of the ST131 subclones.

  • Sejkot, Petr
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för byggteknik (BY).
    Ormarsson, Sigurdur
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för byggteknik (BY).
    Vessby, Johan
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för byggteknik (BY).
    Numerical and experimental study of punched metal plate connection used for long-span pitched timber roof truss structure2018In: WCTE 2018 - World Conference on Timber Engineering, World Conference on Timber Engineering (WCTE) , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the harmonized European design code for timber structures, Eurocode 5, all pitched timber trusses used in load bearing roofs are designed as in-plane structures which means that a bracing system must be designed and put in place to prevent the out-of-plane instability. Results from numerical 3D stability analyses of the whole roof structure indicate that the out of plane stability is often the critical factor. Therefore, influence of stiffness properties of that system is studied in detail herein for long-span timber roofs. Focus is put on how the stiffness of the mechanical connections in the roof structure influences the load carrying capacity of the roof. The punched metal plate connections are modelled as non-coupled spring elements connecting the various beam elements in the timber truss respectively. The spring stiffness of the connections is derived from full-scale tests, which were made for all in- and out-of-plane degrees of freedom. To evaluate the experimental testing, a digital image correlation method was used. The results from the digital image correlation tests were compared with numerical simulations of the experimentally tested connections to check the potential of using the numerical simulations instead of the experimental testing to get the stiffness properties of various connections used in the whole roof stability analysis. Based on such analysis, punched metal plate fasteners showed to be an important contributor to the roof stability because of its relatively high stiffness in all six degrees of freedom.

  • Robinson, Darrel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Tannenberg, Marcus
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Polit Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Self-censorship of regime support in authoritarian states: Evidence from list experiments in China2019In: Res Rhetorica, ISSN 1652-8581, E-ISSN 2053-1680, Vol. 6, no 3, article id UNSP 2053168019856449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of popular support for authoritarian regimes has long relied on the assumption that respondents provide truthful answers to surveys. However, when measuring regime support in closed political systems there is a distinct risk that individuals are less than forthright due to fear that their opinions may be made known to the public or the authorities. In order to test this assumption, we conducted a novel web-based survey in China in which we included four list experiments of commonly used items in the comparative literature on regime support. We find systematic bias for all four measures; substantially more individuals state that they support the regime with direct questioning than when presented with our indirect list experiments. The level of self-censorship, which ranges from 24.5 to 26.5 percentage points, is considerably higher than previously thought. Self-censorship is further most prevalent among the wealthy, urban, female and younger respondents.

  • Vessby, Johan
    et al.
    Växjö universitet, Institutionen för teknik och design.
    Enquist, Bertil
    Växjö universitet, Institutionen för teknik och design.
    Petersson, Hans
    Växjö universitet, Institutionen för teknik och design.
    Alsmarker, Tomas
    Tyréns.
    Experimental study of cross-laminated timber wall panels2009In: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 211-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of cross-laminated structural timber elementsis becoming increasingly popular. The number of layersvaries normally from three upwards. The structural performanceof five-layer cross-laminated timber elements was investigated.The five layers consisted of 19mm thick boards,laid successively at right angles to each other and gluedtogether with PU-adhesive, layers 1, 3 and 5 lying in onedirection and layers 2 and 4 in the other. The stiffness andstrength of four cross-laminated timber elements (4955mmlong, 1250mm wide and 96mm thick) were studied duringin-plane bending. Two of the elements were first partitionedinto two parts that were reconnected in two different waysprior to testing. The influence of the way in which the crosslaminatedtimber elements were reconnected was studied,the behaviour observed being compared with the test resultsfor the unpartitioned specimens with respect to both strengthand stiffness. The experimental tests performed showed thecross-laminated timber elements to possess a high degree ofstiffness and strength. There was also found to be a markeddifference in behaviour between the two different ways inwhich the elements were connected to each other. One of thetwo connecting methods studied, being of less good designbut earlier frequently used in Sweden, showed as expectedpoor structural performance, whereas the other one appliedas a safer alternative performed well.

  • Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Div Cardiovasc Med, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Gender difference and genetic variance in lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 is associated with mortality2019In: BIOMEDICAL REPORTS, ISSN 2049-9434, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 3-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular diseases are an important health resource problem and studies have shown a genetic association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and cardiovascular diseases. According to the literature, lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is associated with coronary artery disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible association between different genotypes of LRP1 and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality from a gender perspective. In the present study, 489 elderly community-living people were invited to participate. Clinical examination, echocardiography and blood sampling including SNP analyses of LRP1 (rs1466535) were performed, including the T/T, C/T and C/C genotypes, and the participants were followed for 6.7 years. During the follow-up period, 116 (24%) all-cause and 75 (15%) cardiovascular deaths were registered. In the female population, the LRP1 of the T/T or C/T genotype exhibited a 5.6-fold increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and a 2.8-fold increased risk of all-cause mortality compared with the C/C genotype. No such genotype differences could be seen in the male population. Gender differences could be seen regarding the risk of mortality in the different genotypes. Females with the LRP1 T/T or C/T genotypes exhibited a significantly increased risk of both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality compared with the C/C genotypes. Therefore, more individualized cardiovascular prevention and treatment should be prioritized. However, since this was a small study, the observations should only be regarded as hypothesis-generating.

  • Müller, Matias I.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Automatic Control.
    Rojas, Cristian R.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Automatic Control.
    Gain estimation of linear dynamical systems using Thompson Sampling2019In: Proceedings of Machine Learning Research / [ed] Kamalika Chaudhuri, Masashi Sugiyama, 2019, Vol. 89, p. 1535-1543Conference paper (Refereed)
  • Syk, Jörgen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research. Karolinska Inst, Care Sci & Soc, Dept Neurobiol, Stockholm, Sweden;Acad Primary Hlth Care Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vinge, Ines
    Lidingo Hosp, Asthma Allergy Lung Dept, Lidingo, Sweden.
    Sorberg, Mikael
    Orion Pharma, Sollentuna, Sweden.
    Vahteristo, Mikko
    Orion Corp, Orion Pharma, Kuopio, Finland.
    Rytila, Paula
    Orion Corp, Orion Pharma, Espoo, Finland.
    A Multicenter, Observational, Prospective Study of the Effectiveness of Switching from Budesonide/Formoterol Turbuhaler® to Budesonide/Formoterol Easyhaler®2019In: Advances in Therapy, ISSN 0741-238X, E-ISSN 1865-8652, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 1756-1769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    In real-life practice, asthma remains poorly controlled, with a considerable burden on patients’ quality of life. Budesonide/formoterol (B/F) Easyhaler® has demonstrated similar dose consistency, therapeutic equivalence, and equivalent bronchodilator efficacy to B/F Turbuhaler®, but no real-life comparisons are yet available in patients switching from B/F Turbuhaler® to B/F Easyhaler®.

    Methods

    The primary objective of this real-life, non-interventional, observational study was to show non-inferiority of asthma control when adult patients in Swedish primary care with persistent asthma switched from B/F Turbuhaler® to B/F Easyhaler®. At visit 1, baseline demographic and endpoint data were recorded, and eligible patients switched to B/F Easyhaler®. The study comprised a control visit (visit 2) and a concluding examination (visit 3) after 12 weeks. Asthma control was assessed using the Asthma Control Test (ACT). The mini-Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) and lung function test were performed, and participants and investigators answered questionnaires about ease-of-use and teaching.

    Results

    A total of 117 patients were enrolled in the on-treatment population; 81 (64.8%) were female. At visit 3, B/F Easyhaler® demonstrated non-inferiority to B/F Turbuhaler®; the mean difference in change from baseline ACT was statistically significant (18.9 vs. 20.7, respectively; p < 0.0001) and met the non-inferiority criteria of B/F Easyhaler® being greater than − 1.5 points versus the reference product. Asthma was well controlled in 62 (53.0%) patients at baseline, increasing to 83 patients (70.9%) at visit 3. Patients experienced statistically significant improvements in mini-AQLQ score after B/F Easyhaler® treatment and lung function remained stable across the treatment period. B/F Easyhaler® was easy to learn and prepare for use.

    Conclusion

    This real-life, non-interventional, non-inferiority study in adults with persist asthma demonstrates equivalent or better disease control when patients switch from B/F Turbuhaler® to B/F Easyhaler®. A further study with direct comparison between treatments could add to the understanding of inhaler switch.

  • Vessby, Johan
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för teknik, TEK.
    Serrano, Erik
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för teknik, TEK.
    Enquist, Bertil
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för teknik, TEK.
    Contact-free measurement and numerical and analytical evaluation of the strain distribution in a wood-FRP lap-joint2010In: Materials and Structures, ISSN 1359-5997, E-ISSN 1871-6873, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 1085-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood specimens to each of which alaminate of carbon fibre reinforcement polymers(FRP) was glued (creating a lap joint in each case)were loaded to failure. A total of 15 specimens ofthree types differing in the glued length (anchoragelength) of the FRP laminate (50, 150 and 250 mmrespectively) were tested, their strength, stiffness andstrain distribution being evaluated. Synchronizeddigital cameras (charge-coupled devices) used intesting enabled strain fields on surfaces they weredirected at during the loading procedure to bemeasured. These results were also evaluated bothanalytically on the basis of generalized Volkersentheory and numerically by use of the finite elementmethod. The lap joints showed a high level ofstiffness as compared with mechanical joints. A highdegree of accuracy in the evaluation of stiffness wasachieved through the use of the contact-free evaluationsystem. The load-bearing capacity of joints ofthis type was found to be dependent upon theanchorage length in a non-linear fashion. The experimental,analytical and numerical results were shownto be in close agreement with respect to the strengthand the strain distribution obtained.

  • Vessby, Johan
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för teknik, TEK.
    Serrano, Erik
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för teknik, TEK.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för teknik, TEK.
    Coupled and uncoupled nonlinear elastic finite element models formonotonically loaded sheathing-to-framing joints in timber based shear walls2010In: Engineering structures, ISSN 0141-0296, E-ISSN 1873-7323, Vol. 32, no 11, p. 3433-3442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four different elastic models for sheathing-to-framing connections are presented and evaluated on asingle connection level and on a shear wall level. Since the models are elastic in their nature they aresuitable mainly for cases where the sheathing-to-framing connections are subjected to monotonicallyincreasing displacements. Of the four models one is uncoupled and the others are coupled with respect tothe two perpendicular displacement directions in a two-dimensional model. Two of the coupled modelsare non-conservative, while the third is conservative, indicating a path independency with respect to thework done to reach a defined state of deformation. When the different models are compared it is obviousthat the uncoupled model gives strength and stiffness values higher than the others; however it is notobvious which of the models to use in a shear wall analysis, each of the models having its advantages anddisadvantages. For the experimental data used as input in the analyses of this study however, a couplednon-conservative model seems the most appropriate.

  • Public defence: 2019-09-20 13:15 Universitetshuset, Uppsala
    Fält, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    A cross-service approach to identify mental health problems in 3–5-year-old children using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Child Healthcare Services (CHS) in Sweden offer regular health check-ups and reach almost all 0–5-year-old children. Although one of the objectives of the CHS is to detect mental health problems, evidence-based methods are not used for this purpose at the Child Health Clinics (CHCs). Therefore, an evidence-based instrument to assess children’s emotional and behavioural problems through parent and teacher reports, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), was introduced, as part of the Children and Parents in Focus trial, run between 2013 and 2017 in Uppsala, Sweden. The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate the introduction of the procedure, including the facilitation strategies provided to support implementation, and to provide inter-rater correlations and norms for the SDQ in this population.

    Data were collected through individual interviews with nurses, parents and preschool teachers; group interviews with nurses; and a survey performed at the end of the trial to evaluate nurses’ experiences of the SDQ-procedure and the implementation process. In addition, delivery, response rate and population coverage of the questionnaires were calculated. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlations and Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC), and qualitative data using Grounded Theory and content analysis.

    Results showed that nurses found it useful for their assessment to have access to preschool teachers’ SDQ-ratings. Parents were also positive to the procedure but had concerns regarding confidentiality of the responses. Preschool teachers were least positive, fearing labelling of children and negative parental reactions. Significant, albeit poor, agreement (ICC) was found between parent and teacher ratings and good agreement between parents’ ratings. Teachers were found to report lower levels of problems compared to parents. Cut-off values differed for age and were somewhat higher for boys (lower for prosocial), suggesting that boys display more behaviour problems. Nurses perceived facilitation strategies used by the research team useful to support implementation and delivered the procedure, essentially, as intended. However, response rate remained lower than expected, around 50%.

    The findings suggest that implementing the SDQ to aid CHC-nurses’ assessment of 3-5-year-olds’ mental health is feasible, but requires further effort in regular services to reach all children.

  • Ekspong, Joakim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Stainless Steel as A Bi-Functional Electrocatalyst-A Top-Down Approach2019In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 12, no 13, article id 2128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For a hydrogen economy to be viable, clean and economical hydrogen production methods are vital. Electrolysis of water is a promising hydrogen production technique with zero emissions, but suffer from relatively high production costs. In order to make electrolysis of water sustainable, abundant, and efficient materials has to replace expensive and scarce noble metals as electrocatalysts in the reaction cells. Herein, we study activated stainless steel as a bi-functional electrocatalyst for the full water splitting reaction by taking advantage of nickel and iron suppressed within the bulk. The final electrocatalyst consists of a stainless steel mesh with a modified surface of layered NiFe nanosheets. By using a top down approach, the nanosheets stay well anchored to the surface and maintain an excellent electrical connection to the bulk structure. At ambient temperature, the activated stainless steel electrodes produce 10 mA/cm(2) at a cell voltage of 1.78 V and display an onset for water splitting at 1.68 V in 1M KOH, which is close to benchmarking nanosized catalysts. Furthermore, we use a scalable activation method using no externally added electrocatalyst, which could be a practical and cheap alternative to traditionally catalyst-coated electrodes.

  • Rytkönen, Paulina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Larsson Segerlind, Tommy
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies.
    Onn, Gustaf
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Tourism Studies.
    Degerstedt, Lars
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Kaipainen, Mauri
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Facing business challenges with the Stockholm Archipelago as a context: A comparative study of entrepreneurial responses and local development on three islands2019In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, E-ISSN 2001-7308, Vol. XII, no 2, p. 74-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By conducting a comparative qualitative and systematic study of the local (island) pre-conditions for creating sustainable socio-economic development through entrepreneurship, here defined as a process of identifying, evaluating, and exploiting entrepreneurial opportunities, this study aims to shed light on entrepreneurial responses to challenges and opportunities on three islands in the Stockholm Archipelago and how context influences these responses.

  • Nordal, Ellen
    et al.
    Univ Hosp North Norway, Dept Pediat, N-9038 Tromso, Norway;UIT Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Clin Med, Tromso, Norway.
    Rypdal, Veronika
    Univ Hosp North Norway, Dept Pediat, N-9038 Tromso, Norway;UIT Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Clin Med, Tromso, Norway.
    Arnstad, Ellen Dalen
    NTNU Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Clin & Mol Med, Trondheim, Norway;Nord Trondelag Hosp Trust, Levanger Hosp, Dept Pediat, Levanger, Norway.
    Aalto, Kristiina
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.
    Berntson, Lillemor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Ekelund, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Dept Pediat, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Fasth, Anders
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Pediat, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Glerup, Mia
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Herlin, Troels
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Susan
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Dept Pediat, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Peltoniemi, Suvi
    Univ Helsinki, Childrens Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.
    Zak, Marek
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Dept Pediat, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Songstad, Nils Thomas
    Univ Hosp North Norway, Dept Pediat, N-9038 Tromso, Norway;UIT Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Clin Med, Tromso, Norway.
    Rygg, Marite
    NTNU Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Clin & Mol Med, Trondheim, Norway;St Olavs Hosp, Dept Pediat, Trondheim, Norway.
    Participation in school and physical education in juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a Nordic long-term cohort study2019In: Pediatric Rheumatology, ISSN 1546-0096, E-ISSN 1546-0096, Vol. 17, article id 44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of the study was to describe school attendance and participation in physical education in school among children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

    Methods: Consecutive cases of JIA from defined geographical areas of Finland, Sweden and Norway with disease onset in 1997 to 2000 were followed for 8 years in a multi-center cohort study, aimed to be as close to population-based as possible. Clinical characteristics and information on school attendance and participation in physical education (PE) were registered.

    Results: Participation in school and in PE was lowest initially and increased during the disease course. Eight years after disease onset 228/274 (83.2%) of the children reported no school absence due to JIA, while 16.8% reported absence during the last 2 months due to JIA. Full participation in PE was reported by 194/242 (80.2%), partly by 16.9%, and none by 2.9%. Lowest participation in PE was found among children with ERA and the undifferentiated categories. Absence in school and PE was associated with higher disease activity measures at the 8-year visit. School absence >1day at baseline predicted use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, including biologics (DMARDs) (OR 1.2 (1.1-1.5)), and non-remission off medication (OR 1.4 (1.1-1.7) 8 years after disease onset.

    Conclusion: School absence at baseline predicted adverse long-term outcome. In children and adolescents with JIA participation in school activities is mostly high after 8years of disease. For the minority with low participation, special attention is warranted to promote their full potential of social interaction and improve long-term outcome.

  • Aster, Alexander
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström. Univ Geneva, Dept Phys Chem, 30 Quai Ernest Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland.
    Wang, Shihuai
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Mirmohades, Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Esmieu, Charlène
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics. CNRS, LCC, 205 Route Narbonne,BP 44099, F-31077 Toulouse 4, France.
    Berggren, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics.
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström.
    Lomoth, Reiner
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström.
    Metal vs. ligand protonation and the alleged proton-shuttling role of the azadithiolate ligand in catalytic H-2 formation with FeFe hydrogenase model complexes2019In: Chemical Science, ISSN 2041-6520, E-ISSN 2041-6539, Vol. 10, no 21, p. 5582-5588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electron and proton transfer reactions of diiron complexes [Fe(2)adt(CO)(6)] (1) and [Fe(2)adt(CO)(4)(PMe3)(2)] (4), with the biomimetic azadithiolate (adt) bridging ligand, have been investigated by real-time IR- and UV-vis-spectroscopic observation to elucidate the role of the adt-N as a potential proton shuttle in catalytic H-2 formation. Protonation of the one-electron reduced complex, 1(-), occurs on the adt-N yielding 1H and the same species is obtained by one-electron reduction of 1H(+). The preference for ligand vs. metal protonation in the Fe-2(i,0) state is presumably kinetic but no evidence for tautomerization of 1H to the hydride 1Hy was observed. This shows that the adt ligand does not work as a proton relay in the formation of hydride intermediates in the reduced catalyst. A hydride intermediate 1HHy(+) is formed only by protonation of 1H with stronger acid. Adt protonation results in reduction of the catalyst at much less negative potential, but subsequent protonation of the metal centers is not slowed down, as would be expected according to the decrease in basicity. Thus, the adtH(+) complex retains a high turnover frequency at the lowered overpotential. Instead of proton shuttling, we propose that this gain in catalytic performance compared to the propyldithiolate analogue might be rationalized in terms of lower reorganization energy for hydride formation with bulk acid upon adt protonation.

  • Public defence: 2019-09-13 13:00 Sal B, Kista
    Sollami Delekta, Szymon
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electronics.
    Inkjet Printing of Graphene-based Microsupercapacitors for Miniaturized Energy Storage Applications2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Printing technologies are becoming increasingly popular because they enable the large-scale and low-cost production of functional devices with various designs, functions, mechanical properties and materials. Among these technologies, inkjet printing is promising thanks to its direct (mask-free) patterning, non-contact nature, low material waste, resolution down to 10 µm, and compatibility with a broad range of materials and substrates. As a result, inkjet printing has applications in several fields like wearables, opto-electronics, thin-film transistors, displays, photovoltaic devices, and in energy storage. It's in energy storage that the technique shows its full potential by allowing the production of miniaturized devices with a compact form factor, high power density and long cycle life, called microsupercapacitors (MSCs). To this end, graphene has a number of remarkable properties like high electrical conductivity, large surface area, elasticity and transparency, making it a top candidate as an electrode material for MSCs.

    Some key drawbacks limit the use of inkjet printing for the production of graphene-based MSCs. This thesis aims at improving its scalability by producing fully inkjet printed devices, and extending its applications through the integration of inkjet printing with other fabrication techniques.

    MSCs typically rely on the deposition by hand of gel electrolyte that is not printable or by submerging the whole structure into liquid electrolyte. Because of this, so far large-scale production of more than 10 interconnected devices has not been attempted. In this thesis, a printable gel electrolyte ink based on poly(4-styrene sulfonic acid) was developed, allowing the production of large arrays of more than 100 fully inkjet printed devices connected in series and parallel that can be reliably charged up to 12 V. Also, a second electrolyte ink based on nano-graphene oxide, a solid-state material with high ionic conductivity, was formulated to optimize the volumetric performance of these devices. The resulting MSCs were also fully inkjet printed and exhibited an overall device thickness of around 1 µm, yielding a power density of 80 mW cm-3.

    Next, the use of inkjet printing of graphene was explored for the fabrication of transparent MSCs. This application is typically hindered by the so-called coffee-ring effect, which creates dark deposits on the edges of the drying patterns and depletes material from the inside area. In light of this issue, inkjet printing was combined with etching to remove the dark deposits thus leaving uniform and thin films of graphene with vertical sidewalls. The resulting devices showed a transmittance of up to 90%.

    Finally, the issue of the substrate compatibility of inkjet printed graphene was addressed. Although inkjet printing is considered to have broad substrate versatility, it is unreliable on hydrophilic or porous substrates and most inks (including graphene inks) require thermal annealing that damages substrates that are not resistant to heat. Accordingly, a technique based on inkjet printing and wet transfer was developed to reliably deposit graphene-based MSCs on a number of substrates, including flat, 3D, porous, plastics and biological (plants and fruits) with adverse surfaces.

    The contributions of this thesis have the potential to boost the use of inkjet printed MSCs in applications requiring scalability and resolution (e.g. on-chip integration) as well as applications requiring conformability and versatility (e.g. wearable electronics).

  • Herrmann, François R
    et al.
    Geneva Univ Hosp, Dept Rehabil & Geriatr, Div Geriatr, Geneva, Switzerland;Univ Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Rodriguez, Cristelle
    Univ Geneva, Dept Psychiat, Geneva, Switzerland;Geneva Univ Hosp, Med Direct, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Haller, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. CIRO Ctr Imagerie Rive Droite, Geneva, Switzerland;Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Garibotto, Valentina
    Univ Geneva, Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland;Geneva Univ Hosp, Div Nucl Med & Mol Imaging, Diagnost Dept, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Montandon, Marie-Louise
    Geneva Univ Hosp, Dept Rehabil & Geriatr, Div Geriatr, Geneva, Switzerland;Univ Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland;Univ Geneva, Dept Psychiat, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon
    Univ Geneva, Dept Psychiat, Geneva, Switzerland;Geneva Univ Hosp, Med Direct, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Gray Matter Densities in Limbic Areas and APOE4 Independently Predict Cognitive Decline in Normal Brain Aging2019In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 11, article id 157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies reported significant associations between gray matter (GM) density changes in various limbic and neocortical areas and worst cognitive performances in elderly controls. Longitudinal studies in this field remain scarce and led to conflicting data. We report a clinico-radiological investigation of 380 cognitively preserved individuals who undergo neuropsychological assessment at baseline and after 18 months. All cases were assessed using a continuous cognitive score taking into account the global evolution of neuropsychological performances. The vast majority of Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) 29 and 30 cases showed equal or worst performance at follow-up due to a ceiling effect. GM densities, white matter hyperintensities and arterial spin labeling (ASL) values were assessed in the hippocampus, amygdala, mesial temporal and parietal cortex at inclusion using 3 Tesla MRI Scans. Florbetapir positron emission tomography (PET) amyloid was available in a representative subsample of 64 cases. Regional amyloid uptake ratios (SUVr), mean cortical SUVr values (mcSUVr) and corresponding z-scores were calculated. Linear regression models were built to explore the association between the continuous cognitive score and imaging variables. The presence of an APOE-epsilon 4 allele was negatively related to the continuous cognitive score. Among the areas studied, significant associations were found between GM densities in the hippocampus and amygdala but not mesial temporal and parietal areas and continuous cognitive score. Neither ASL values, Fazekas score nor mean and regional PET amyloid load was related to the cognitive score. In multivariate models, the presence of APOE-epsilon 4 allele and GM densities in the hippocampus and amygdala were independently associated with worst cognitive evolution at follow-up. Our data support the idea that early GM damage in the hippocampus and amygdala occur long before the emergence of the very first signs of cognitive failure in brain aging.

  • Memon, Shahbaz
    et al.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich Supercomp Ctr, Leo Brandt Str, D-52428 Julich, Germany;Univ Iceland, Fac Ind Engn Mech Engn & Comp Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Vallot, Dorothée
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Zwinger, Thomas
    CSC IT Ctr Sci Ltd, Espoo, Finland.
    Åstrom, Jan
    CSC IT Ctr Sci Ltd, Espoo, Finland.
    Neukirchen, Helmut
    Univ Iceland, Fac Ind Engn Mech Engn & Comp Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Riedel, Morris
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich Supercomp Ctr, Leo Brandt Str, D-52428 Julich, Germany;Univ Iceland, Fac Ind Engn Mech Engn & Comp Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Book, Matthias
    Univ Iceland, Fac Ind Engn Mech Engn & Comp Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Scientific workflows applied to the coupling of a continuum (Elmer v8.3) and a discrete element (HiDEM v1.0) ice dynamic model2019In: Geoscientific Model Development, ISSN 1991-959X, E-ISSN 1991-9603, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 3001-3015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientific computing applications involving complex simulations and data-intensive processing are often composed of multiple tasks forming a workflow of computing jobs. Scientific communities running such applications on computing resources often find it cumbersome to manage and monitor the execution of these tasks and their associated data. These workflow implementations usually add overhead by introducing unnecessary input/output (I/O) for coupling the models and can lead to sub-optimal CPU utilization. Furthermore, running these workflow implementations in different environments requires significant adaptation efforts, which can hinder the reproducibility of the underlying science. High-level scientific workflow management systems (WMS) can be used to automate and simplify complex task structures by providing tooling for the composition and execution of workflows - even across distributed and heterogeneous computing environments. The WMS approach allows users to focus on the underlying high-level workflow and avoid low-level pitfalls that would lead to non-optimal resource usage while still allowing the workflow to remain portable between different computing environments. As a case study, we apply the UNICORE workflow management system to enable the coupling of a glacier flow model and calving model which contain many tasks and dependencies, ranging from pre-processing and data management to repetitive executions in heterogeneous high-performance computing (HPC) resource environments. Using the UNICORE workflow management system, the composition, management, and execution of the glacier modelling workflow becomes easier with respect to usage, monitoring, maintenance, reusability, portability, and reproducibility in different environments and by different user groups. Last but not least, the workflow helps to speed the runs up by reducing model coupling I/O overhead and it optimizes CPU utilization by avoiding idle CPU cores and running the models in a distributed way on the HPC cluster that best fits the characteristics of each model.

  • Sawalha, Sami
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Backman, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Stenfors, Nikolai
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lundback, Bo
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    The impact of comorbidities on mortality among men and women with COPD: report from the OLIN COPD study2019In: THERAPEUTIC ADVANCES IN RESPIRATORY DISEASE, ISSN 1753-4658, Vol. 13, article id 1753466619860058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Comorbidities probably contribute to the increased mortality observed among subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but sex differences in the prognostic impact of comorbidities have rarely been evaluated in population-based studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of common comorbidities, cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus (DM), and anxiety/depression (A/D), on mortality among men and women with and without airway obstruction in a population-based study. Methods: All subjects with airway obstruction [forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/(forced) vital capacity ((F)VC) <0.70, n = 993] were, together with age- and sex-matched referents, identified after examinations of population-based cohorts in 2002-2004. Spirometric groups: normal lung function (NLF) and COPD (post-bronchodilator FEV1/(F)VC <0.70) and additionally, LLN-COPD (FEV1/(F)VC <lower limit of normal). Mortality data was collected until December 2015. Results: In COPD, the prevalence of CVD and DM was higher in men, whereas the prevalence of A/D was higher in women. The cumulative mortality was significantly higher in COPD than NLF, and higher in men than women in both groups. Among women with COPD, CVD and A/D but not DM increased the risk of death independent of age, body mass index, smoking habits, and disease severity, whereas among men DM and A/D but not CVD increased the risk for death. When the LLN criterion was applied, the pattern was similar. Conclusion: There were sex-dependent differences regarding the impact of comorbidities on prognosis in COPD. Even though the prevalence of CVD was higher in men, the impact of CVD on mortality was higher in women, and despite higher prevalence of A/D in women, the impact on mortality was similar in both sexes. The reviews of this paper are available via the supplemental material section.

  • Huang, Jing
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci, Dept Appl Phys, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Xu, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Tian, Lei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Pati, Palas Baran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Etman, Ahmed S.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem MMK, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sun, Junliang
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem MMK, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hammarström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    Tian, Haining
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Physical Chemistry.
    A heavy metal-free CuInS2 quantum dot sensitized NiO photocathode with a Re molecular catalyst for photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction2019In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 55, no 55, p. 7918-7921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heavy metal-free CuInS2 quantum dots (QDs) were employed as a photosensitizer on a NiO photocathode to drive an immobilized molecular Re catalyst for photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction for the first time. A photocurrent of 25 mu A cm(-2) at -0.87 V vs. NHE was obtained, providing a faradaic efficiency of 32% for CO production.

  • Sharma, Vaibhav
    et al.
    AIIMS, Dept Biophys, New Delhi, India.
    Srinivasan, Alagiri
    Jamia Hamdard, Dept Biochem, New Delhi, India.
    Roychoudhury, Ajoy
    AIIMS, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Surg, CDER, New Delhi, India.
    Rani, Komal
    AIIMS, Dept Biophys, New Delhi, India.
    Tyagi, Mitali
    AIIMS, Dept Biophys, New Delhi, India.
    Dev, Kapil
    Jamia Milia Islamia, Dept Biotechnol, New Delhi, India.
    Nikolajeff, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Kumar, Saroj
    AIIMS, Dept Biophys, New Delhi, India.
    Characterization of protein extracts from different types of human teeth and insight in biomineralization2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 9314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study describes an efficient method for isolation and purification of protein extracts from four types of human teeth i.e. molar, premolar, canine, and incisor. Detailed structural characterization of these protein extracts was done by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) which showed that a major fraction of the proteins present are unstructured in nature including primarily random coils in addition to the other structures like extended beta (beta) structure, poly-l-proline-type II (PPII) helix, turns, with only a small fraction constituting of ordered structures like alpha (alpha) helix and beta sheets. These resultant labile structures give the proteins the necessary flexibility that they require to interact with a variety of substrates including different ions like calcium and phosphates and for other protein-protein interactions. We also did initial studies on the mineralization of calcium phosphate with the protein extracts. Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) show an increase in the size of calcium phosphate accumulation in the presence of protein extracts. We propose that protein extracts elevate the crystallization process of calcium phosphate. Our current biophysical study provides novel insights into the structural characterization of proteins from human teeth and their implications in understanding the tooth biomineralization. As per our knowledge, this is the first report which focuses on the whole protein extraction from different types of human teeth as these extracts imitate the in vivo tooth mineralization.

  • Alerstam, Thomas
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Bäckman, Johan
    Lund University.
    Johanna, Grönroos
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Olofsson, Patrik
    Heberg, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Roine
    Lund University.
    Hypotheses and tracking results about the longest migration: the case of the arctic tern2019In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The arctic tern Sterna paradisaea completes the longest known annual return migration on Earth, traveling between breeding sites in the northern arctic and temperate regions and survival/molt areas in the Antarctic pack‐ice zone. Salomonsen (1967, Biologiske Meddelelser, Copenhagen Danske Videnskabernes Selskab24, 1) put forward a hypothetical comprehensive interpretation of this global migration pattern, suggesting food distribution, wind patterns, sea ice distribution, and molt habits as key ecological and evolutionary determinants. We used light‐level geolocators to record 12 annual journeys by eight individuals of arctic terns breeding in the Baltic Sea. Migration cycles were evaluated in light of Salomonsen's hypotheses and compared with results from geolocator studies of arctic tern populations from Greenland, Netherlands, and Alaska. The Baltic terns completed a 50,000 km annual migration circuit, exploiting ocean regions of high productivity in the North Atlantic, Benguela Current, and the Indian Ocean between southern Africa and Australia (sometimes including the Tasman Sea). They arrived about 1 November in the Antarctic zone at far easterly longitudes (in one case even at the Ross Sea) subsequently moving westward across 120–220 degrees of longitude toward the Weddell Sea region. They departed from here in mid‐March on a fast spring migration up the Atlantic Ocean. The geolocator data revealed unexpected segregation in time and space between tern populations in the same flyway. Terns from the Baltic and Netherlands traveled earlier and to significantly more easterly longitudes in the Indian Ocean and Antarctic zone than terns from Greenland. We suggest an adaptive explanation for this pattern. The global migration system of the arctic tern offers an extraordinary possibility to understand adaptive values and constraints in complex pelagic life cycles, as determined by environmental conditions (marine productivity, wind patterns, low‐pressure trajectories, pack‐ice distribution), inherent factors (flight performance, molt, flocking), and effects of predation/piracy and competition.

  • Ablikim, M.
    et al.
    Adlarson, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Biernat, Jacek
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Ikegami Andersson, Walter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Johansson, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Kupsc, Andrzej
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Li, Cui
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Papenbrock, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Pettersson, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Schönning, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Thorén, Viktor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Wolke, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Zou, J. H.
    Observation of psi(3686) -> p(p)over-bar phi2019In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 99, no 11, article id 112010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a data sample of 4.48 x 10(8) psi(3686) events collected with the BESIII detector, we present a first observation of psi(3686) -> p (p) over bar phi, and we measure its branching fraction to be [6.06 +/- 0.38(stat)+/- 0.48(syst)] x 10(-6). In contrast to the earlier discovery of a threshold enhancement in the p (p) over bar -mass spectrum of the channel j/psi -> gamma p (p) over bar, denoted as X(p (p) over bar), we do not find a similar enhancement in psi(3686) -> p (p) over bar phi. An upper limit of 1.82 x 10(-7) at the 90% confidence level on the branching fraction of psi(3686) -> X(p (p) over bar)phi -> p (p) over bar phi is obtained.

  • Public defence: 2019-09-12 13:00 F3, Stockholm
    Bütepage, Judith
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Generative models for action generation and action understanding2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of how to build intelligent machines raises the question of how to rep-resent the world to enable intelligent behavior. In nature, this representation relies onthe interplay between an organism’s sensory input and motor input. Action-perceptionloops allow many complex behaviors to arise naturally. In this work, we take these sen-sorimotor contingencies as an inspiration to build robot systems that can autonomouslyinteract with their environment and with humans. The goal is to pave the way for robotsystems that can learn motor control in an unsupervised fashion and relate their ownsensorimotor experience to observed human actions. By combining action generationand action understanding we hope to facilitate smooth and intuitive interaction betweenrobots and humans in shared work spaces.To model robot sensorimotor contingencies and human behavior we employ gen-erative models. Since generative models represent a joint distribution over relevantvariables, they are flexible enough to cover the range of tasks that we are tacklinghere. Generative models can represent variables that originate from multiple modali-ties, model temporal dynamics, incorporate latent variables and represent uncertaintyover any variable - all of which are features required to model sensorimotor contin-gencies. By using generative models, we can predict the temporal development of thevariables in the future, which is important for intelligent action selection.We present two lines of work. Firstly, we will focus on unsupervised learning ofmotor control with help of sensorimotor contingencies. Based on Gaussian Processforward models we demonstrate how the robot can execute goal-directed actions withthe help of planning techniques or reinforcement learning. Secondly, we present anumber of approaches to model human activity, ranging from pure unsupervised mo-tion prediction to including semantic action and affordance labels. Here we employdeep generative models, namely Variational Autoencoders, to model the 3D skeletalpose of humans over time and, if required, include semantic information. These twolines of work are then combined to implement physical human-robot interaction tasks.Our experiments focus on real-time applications, both when it comes to robot ex-periments and human activity modeling. Since many real-world scenarios do not haveaccess to high-end sensors, we require our models to cope with uncertainty. Additionalrequirements are data-efficient learning, because of the wear and tear of the robot andhuman involvement, online employability and operation under safety and complianceconstraints. We demonstrate how generative models of sensorimotor contingencies canhandle these requirements in our experiments satisfyingly.

  • Halvorsen, Cecilia Pegelow
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Res & Educ, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden;Sachs Children & Youth Hosp, Neonatal Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olson, Linus
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden;TRAC Sweden Vietnam, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Araujo, Ana Catarina
    Calmark Sweden AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mathias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry. Calmark Sweden AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nguyen, Trang Thi
    Khu, Dung T. K.
    TRAC Sweden Vietnam, Hanoi, Vietnam;Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Le, Ha T. T.
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Hanoi, Vietnam;Res Inst Child Hlth, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Nguyen, Hoa T. B.
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Hanoi, Vietnam;Res Inst Child Hlth, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Winbladh, Birger
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Res & Educ, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Div Nanobiotechnol, Dept Prot Sci, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth,Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A rapid smartphone-based lactate dehydrogenase test for neonatal diagnostics at the point of care2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 9301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing recognition of the importance of point-of-care tests (POCTs) for detecting critical neonatal illnesses to reduce the mortality rate in newborns, especially in low-income countries, which account for 98 percent of reported neonatal deaths. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a marker of cellular damage as a result of hypoxia-ischemia in affected organs. Here, we describe and test a POC LDH test direct from whole blood to provide early indication of serious illness in the neonate. The sample-inresult- out POC platform is specifically designed to meet the needs at resource-limited settings. Plasma is separated from whole blood on filter paper with dried-down reagents for colorimetric reaction, combined with software for analysis using a smartphone. The method was clinically tested in newborns in two different settings. In a clinical cohort of newborns of Stockholm (n = 62) and Hanoi (n = 26), the value of R using Pearson's correlation test was 0.91 (p < 0.01) and the R-2 = 0.83 between the two methods. The mean LDH (+/- SD) for the reference method vs. the POC-LDH was 551 (+/- 280) U/L and 552 (+/- 249) U/L respectively, indicating the clinical value of LDH values measured in minutes with the POC was comparable with standardized laboratory analyses.

  • Sorensen, Julie
    et al.
    Johansson, Helene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Jerdén, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Dalton, James
    Sheikh, Henna
    Jenkins, Paul
    May, John
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Health-Care Administrator Perspectives on Prevention Guidelines and Healthy Lifestyle Counseling in a Primary Care Setting in New York State2019In: HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH AND MANAGERIAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, ISSN 2333-3928, Vol. 6, article id UNSP 2333392819862122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The incidence of chronic disease and treatment costs have been steadily increasing in the United States over the past few decades. Primary prevention and healthy lifestyle counseling have been identified as important strategies for reducing health-care costs and chronic disease prevalence. This article seeks to examine decision-makers' experiences and self-perceived roles in guideline and lifestyle counseling implementation in a primary care setting in the United States. Methods: Qualitative interviews were conducted with administrators at a health-care network in Upstate New York and with state-level administrators, such as insurers. Decision-makers were asked to discuss prevention guidelines and healthy lifestyle counseling, as well as how they support implementation of these initiatives. Interviews were analyzed using a thematic analysis framework and relevant sections of text were sorted using a priori codes. Results: Interviews identified numerous barriers to guideline implementation. These included the complexity and profusion of guidelines, the highly politicized nature of health-care provision, and resistance from providers who sometimes prefer to make decisions autonomously. Barriers to supporting prevention counseling included relatively time-limited patient encounters, the lack of reimbursement mechanisms for counseling, lack of patient resources, and regulatory complexities. Conclusions: Our research indicates that administrators and administrative structures face barriers to supporting prevention activities such as guideline implementation and healthy lifestyle counseling in primary care settings. They also identified several solutions for addressing existing primary prevention barriers, such as relying on nurses to provide healthy lifestyle support to patients. This article provides an important assessment of institutional readiness to support primary prevention efforts.

  • Dederichs, Anne (Editor)
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Safety. DTU Technical University of Denmark.
    Zawadowska, Aleksandra (Editor)
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Safety.
    Hemmarö, Linnea (Editor)
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Safety.
    NFSD Nordic Fire & Safety Days: Book of abstracts from the NFSD Nordic Fire & Safety Days 20-21 August 2019 in Copenhagen, Denmark2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is our pleasure to hand over to you this book of abstracts for the Nordic Fire & SafetyDays 2019 organized by RISE Research Institutes of Sweden in collaboration Technical University of Denmark, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Lund University, Aalto University, Luleå University, University of Stavanger, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences and Iceland University as well as VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd and Danish Institute of Fire and Security Technology.We are very proud to present the abstracts of 63 Nordic and international contributions in the present book of abstracts. The work demonstrates a significant scientific depth and societal relevance. The conference is a response to the extensive interest in the areas of fire and safety engineering in the Nordic countries in the past decades. As the programme and the abstracts show, the NFSD follow up on challenges with respect to safety dealing with aspects of fire and human behaviour as well as rescue service and risk management.

    Anne S. Dederichs, RISE Research Institutes of SwedenConference chair

  • Public defence: 2019-09-06 10:00 F3, Stockholm
    Abdalmoaty, Mohamed
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Automatic Control. KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Identification of Stochastic Nonlinear Dynamical Models Using Estimating Functions2019Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Data-driven modeling of stochastic nonlinear systems is recognized as a very challenging problem, even when reduced to a parameter estimation problem. A main difficulty is the intractability of the likelihood function, which renders favored estimation methods, such as the maximum likelihood method, analytically intractable. During the last decade, several numerical methods have been developed to approximately solve the maximum likelihood problem. A class of algorithms that attracted considerable attention is based on sequential Monte Carlo algorithms (also known as particle filters/smoothers) and particle Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms. These algorithms were able to obtain impressive results on several challenging benchmark problems; however, their application is so far limited to cases where fundamental limitations, such as the sample impoverishment and path degeneracy problems, can be avoided.

    This thesis introduces relatively simple alternative parameter estimation methods that may be used for fairly general stochastic nonlinear dynamical models. They are based on one-step-ahead predictors that are linear in the observed outputs and do not require the computations of the likelihood function. Therefore, the resulting estimators are relatively easy to compute and may be highly competitive in this regard: they are in fact defined by analytically tractable objective functions in several relevant cases. In cases where the predictors are analytically intractable due to the complexity of the model, it is possible to resort to {plain} Monte Carlo approximations. Under certain assumptions on the data and some conditions on the model, the convergence and consistency of the estimators can be established. Several numerical simulation examples and a recent real-data benchmark problem demonstrate a good performance of the proposed method, in several cases that are considered challenging, with a considerable reduction in computational time in comparison with state-of-the-art sequential Monte Carlo implementations of the ML estimator.

    Moreover, we provide some insight into the asymptotic properties of the proposed methods. We show that the accuracy of the estimators depends on the model parameterization and the shape of the unknown distribution of the outputs (via the third and fourth moments). In particular, it is shown that when the model is non-Gaussian, a prediction error method based on the Gaussian assumption is not necessarily more accurate than one based on an optimally weighted parameter-independent quadratic norm. Therefore, it is generally not obvious which method should be used. This result comes in contrast to a current belief in some of the literature on the subject. 

    Furthermore, we introduce the estimating functions approach, which was mainly developed in the statistics literature, as a generalization of the maximum likelihood and prediction error methods. We show how it may be used to systematically define optimal estimators, within a predefined class, using only a partial specification of the probabilistic model. Unless the model is Gaussian, this leads to estimators that are asymptotically uniformly more accurate than linear prediction error methods when quadratic criteria are used. Convergence and consistency are established under standard regularity and identifiability assumptions akin to those of prediction error methods.

    Finally, we consider the problem of closed-loop identification when the system is stochastic and nonlinear. A couple of scenarios given by the assumptions on the disturbances, the measurement noise and the knowledge of the feedback mechanism are considered. They include a challenging case where the feedback mechanism is completely unknown to the user. Our methods can be regarded as generalizations of some classical closed-loop identification approaches for the linear time-invariant case. We provide an asymptotic analysis of the methods, and demonstrate their properties in a simulation example.

  • Public defence: 2019-09-09 10:15 Hörsal 2, Uppsala
    Larsson, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Att översätta Lean till praktik i hälso- och sjukvården2019Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean has been widely discussed and introduced in Sweden as well as internationally. This thesis deals with the question of how Lean has been translated from idea into practice in healthcare. It contributes to Scandinavian institutional theory, more specifically translation theory. The thesis shows how Lean is translated at the micro level, i.e. at two healthcare units that deal directly with patients. Lean is quite a broad and flexible management idea. In this thesis Lean has been specified into the central concepts of value and flow. The thesis focuses on how these concepts have been translated in healthcare, investigating the role of translators and arenas in local translation processes at the micro level. The thesis is based on a comparative case study of two healthcare units, at two different hospitals, within public healthcare. In 2009 the healthcare units started to implement Lean with the aim that they would improve patient flow and increase quality. The thesis includes a vast number of internal documents, interviews and observations. It also includes a follow-up of the two cases a few years after the initial interviews were carried out. The study presents a number of contributions. Analysis shows that the local translation process in each case resulted in a mutual adaptation between Lean and practice. Furthermore, the introduction of Lean didn´t change the work of the units completely. Lean was translated in a way that supported how the units were organized already before the introduction of Lean instead of changing them. The analysis also shows that the translation of Lean was not isolated within the healthcare units, but spilled over into and was influenced by the surrounding context, both to the private sphere and to other organizations. The findings indicate that translation is something that is going on everywhere, all the time and that the connection between the public and the private sphere, through conversations and small talk about Lean, can be a way of spreading and translating ideas. The introduction of Lean at the units started as a top-down process. But Lean was also translated horizontally to and from friends and family members who had met Lean in other contexts. The translators and arenas at the micro-level filled an important function in the way in which Lean was translated into practice in the operational core where small talk and discussions seemed to be important. But in addition to this the thesis also shows that an actor in a formal position is required to add energy and drive the work with Lean forward.

  • Wøien, Mari
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordregio.
    Is the coast clear?: The role of digitalisation for enabling blue growth in the cross-border region of Svinesund2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalisation is impacting various facets of society and holds great potential in radically changing the ways businesses are operating. Despite these radical changes, little has been said about the impact of digitalisation on micro-, small and medium-sized businesses within the marine sector.

    To close this gap, this complimentary report, Is the coast clear? The role of digitalisation for enabling blue growth in the cross-border region of Svinesund is a follow-up study of Randal and Berlina’s report Governing the digital transition in Nordic regions: The human element (2019).

    The latter report was written on behalf of the Nordic thematic group for innovative and resilient regions 2017–2020, under the Nordic Council of Ministers’ Committee of Civil Servants for Regional Affairs.

    The present, complimentary study on digitalisation and blue growth has been developed on behalf of the Nordic thematic working group’s member Svinesundskommittén (The Svinesund committee).

    The study explores what role digitalisation plays in the context of business development and growth in the marine sector in the Svinesund area; the different challenges and opportunities that surface in this context; and what role the Svinesund mega-region may play for the future of blue growth.

  • Svedbo Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Borg, Sixten
    Palaszewski, Bo
    Franzén, Stefan
    Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia
    Eeg-Olofsson, Katarina
    Health-related quality of life and glycaemic control among adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes: a nationwide cross-sectional study2019In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health-related quality of life and glycaemic control are some of the central outcomes in clinical diabetes care and research. The purpose of this study was to describe the health-related quality of life and assess its association with glycaemic control in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes in a nationwide setting.

    Methods: In this cross-sectional survey, people with type 1 (n = 2479) and type 2 diabetes (n = 2469) were selected at random without replacement from the Swedish National Diabetes Register. Eligibility criteria were being aged 18–80 years with at least one registered test of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) the last 12 months. The generic 36- item Short Form version 2 (SF-36v2) was answered by 1373 (55.4%) people with type 1 diabetes and 1353 (54.8%) with type 2 diabetes.

    Results: Correlation analyses showed weak correlations between scores on the SF-36v2 and glycaemic control for both diabetes types. After the participants were divided into three groups based on their levels of HbA1c, multivariate regression analyses adjusted for demographics, other risk factors and diabetes complications showed that among participants with type 1 diabetes, the high-risk group (≥70 mmol/mol/8.6%) had statistically significantly lower means in five out of eight domains of the SF-36v2 and the mental component summary measure, as compared with the well-controlled group (< 52 mmol/mol/6.9%). Among the participants with type 2 diabetes, the high-risk group had the lowest statistically significantly means in seven domains and both summary measures.

    Conclusions: Among people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, adults with high-risk HbA1c levels have lower levels of health-related quality of life in most but not all domains of the SF-36v2. This finding was not explained by demographics, other risk factors, or diabetes complications. The weak individual-level correlations between HRQOL scores and levels of glycaemic control argues for the need to not focus exclusively on either HbA1c levels or HRQOL scores but rather on both because both are important parts of a complex, life-long, challenging condition.

  • Balachandran, Chanchal
    et al.
    The Netherlands.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Linköping University.
    Umans, Timurs
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, Research environment Auditing, Organisation and Society (AOS). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Business, Avdelningen för ekonomi. Jönköping University.
    National culture diversity in new venture boards: the role of founders' relational demography2019In: Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, ISSN 1932-4391, E-ISSN 1932-443XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract/Research Summary: This study explains the conditions underwhich new venture boards are less or more culturallydiverse in terms of their directors' country of birth. Longitudi-nal data on 5,515 Swedish ventures suggest that most direc-tors are recruited from founders' proximate social settings neighborhoods in which they reside and past workplaces and that diversity levels in these social settings strongly predict the national culture diversity in venture boards. Given the rapid internationalization of workplaces and region saround the world, this paper provides important clues regarding how culturally diverse upper echelons are being incorporated into the organizational design of new ventures.

    Managerial Summary: Most New Venture Boards exhibitlimited diversity in terms of their directors' country of birth, as they are drawn from the venture founders' network. Yet,some new venture boards are indeed born diverse. Our study reveals that founders with prior exposure to culturally diverse workplaces and residential neighborhoods are much more likely to design a culturally diverse board at founding. Given the rapid internationalization of workplaces andregions in most countries around the world, our paper provides important clues regarding how national culture diversity in top management emerges and is being incorporatedinto the organizational design of new ventures.

  • Public defence: 2019-09-06 13:15 sal IV, Uppsala
    Jönson Ring, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Nocturnal enuresis and rapid maxillary expansion: – long-term effect, prognostic variables, respiration during sleep and quality of life2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:The orthodontic technique rapid maxillary expansion (RME) has been reported to have a potentially curative effect on nocturnal enuresis (NE). The mechanism behind this is unknown but could possibly be due to placebo and/or effects on respiration during sleep. 

    Aim: This thesis aims to approach an answer to the following questions, with a randomized, placebo-controlled method: 1) Does rapid maxillary expansion have a curative effect on therapy-resistant NE? 2) Is the potential curative effect due to respiratory events that can be measured during sleep? 3) Do enuretic children have an impaired quality of life (QoL)?  

    Subjects & Methods: In study I we evaluated the QoL in enuretic children while assessing the test re-test reliability of a Swedish version of an established QoL questionnaire. Study II and IV assess respiration during sleep in children with NE; in study II comparisons are made with healthy control children and in study IV we evaluate the respiratory effects of RME. Study III is a randomized placebo-controlled study investigating whether RME is a useful therapy for NE and if the treatment effect is due to placebo.

    Results: Study I:The Swedish version of the questionnaire proved to be a reliable tool (Chronbach’s alpha 0.87) with excellent test-retest stability (ICC = 0.762). Enuresis affects the children’s QoL and interactions with peers.

    Study II:The hypopnea index (HI) and the oxygen desaturation index were both significantly higher in the enuretic children compared to the healthy controls, (p=0.04 and p=0.05) but all values fell within the normal range.

    Study III:RME resulted in a significant reduction in wet nights i.e. the mean number of wet nights out of 14 was 11.4 before and 9.2 after RME. (p=0.003) This was not observed in the placebo group (p=0.40).

    Study IV:There was a significant reduction of sleep efficiency during RME. (p=0.001) The mean HI was also affected. (p=0.005)

    Conclusions:

    Children with nocturnal enuresis have an impaired self-esteem and their quality of life is affected in their relationship with friends.

    There were no major differences in respiration during sleep between enuretic children and controls.

    Rapid maxillary expansion reduces the number of wet nights in children with enuresis, but the effect is of limited clinical value.

    The antienuretic effect does not seem to be due to a placebo effect of the appliance.

    The majority of the children in our study sample did not have sleep disordered breathing as a co-morbidity to their nocturnal enuresis. 

  • Anderson, Lotta
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Möllås, Gunvie
    Jönköping University.
    Ohlsson, Lisbeth
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap inriktning grundskola, gymnasium och specialpedagogik. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Education, Forskningsmiljön Forskning Relationell Pedagogik (FoRP).
    Characteristics of independent schools directed at students in need of special support: a study of school website presentation2019In: Problems of Education in the 21st Century, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 317-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the research was to explore how 55 Swedish independent schools, directed at (or limited to) students in need of special support (SNSS), describe their organisation, work and visions. The empirical data of the research consisted of the schools’ website presentations, which were processed and analysed in consecutive steps. The results showed that the students’ complicated school- and life situations were often combined with disabilities mainly in the neuropsychiatric field. The majority of the schools (76%) practiced both schooling and methods for treatment and care, differentiating their role from the mainstream track. Neuropsychiatric and psychological perspectives had a significant influence, reflected in how the schools describe their daily routines, therapeutic methods of treatment and access to specific categories of staff. Small groups, individual instruction and competent staff were described as specific features. Teaching content and didactic aspects were seldom highlighted. The focus on the websites was on socialisation and subjectification while qualification, i.e. knowledge development, had a more limited role. The study points to a need for further research exploring daily pedagogical practice in more depth and calls for a greater focus on student perspectives. Consequences for learning contexts are discussed in the concluding part of the article. The specialist role, the independent schools in the present study tended to take on are most urgent issues to discuss in an educational context striving for equity and inclusive learning environments. 

  • Public defence: 2019-09-06 10:00 Lindahlsalen, Uppsala
    van der Valk, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Genomics of population decline2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With human populations forecasted to grow in the next decades, many mammals face increasing anthropogenic threats. The consequential population declines are a precursor to extinctions, as small populations are not only more sensitive to stochastic events, but reduction in population size is generally also followed by a decrease in genetic diversity, which in turn reduces adaptive potential and fitness of the population. By using molecular methods I aimed to estimate the magnitude of the genomic consequences as a result of rapid population declines with a focus on the endangered eastern gorillas. First, I genotyped Grauer’s gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) faecal samples, which revealed lower genetic diversity and high differentiation in the peripheral compared to the central populations, indicating a strong effect of genetic drift and limited gene flow among the small, isolated forest fragments (Chapter 1). Next, by using a target capture approach I obtained complete mitochondrial genomes from degraded Grauer’s and mountain (Gorilla beringei beringei) gorilla faecal and museum samples (Chapter 2) which showed a loss of mitochondrial diversity within the last century in Grauer’s gorillas, mainly driven by the extinction of peripheral populations (Chapter 3). Genome-wide sequence data from historical samples suggests that this loss has also affected the nuclear genome, as modern Grauer’s gorillas carry on average more genetic variants with putatively negative fitness consequences than historically. No significant temporal changes were observed in the closely related mountain gorillas, which might be due to their contrasting demographic history (Chapter 4). I then switched study species to the endangered Dryas monkey and find that, despite its possible small population size, the current Dryas monkey population is genetically diverse with low levels of inbreeding and as such likely viable in the long-term if appropriate conservation measures are taken (Chapter 5). Finally, I aimed to estimate the strength of genetic purging across a range of mammalian species. This revealed that although genetic purging might be common among endangered species, it mainly acts on long evolutionary time scales with limited strength during the rapid population declines as experienced by many species today (Chapter 6).

  • Johansson, Sandra
    et al.
    Golub, Koraljka
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    LibraryThing for Libraries: How Tag Moderation and Size Limitations Affect Tag Clouds2019In: Knowledge organization, ISSN 0943-7444, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 245-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to analyse differences between tags on LibraryThing’s web page and tag clouds in their “LibraryThing for Libraries” service, and assess if, and how, the LibraryThing tag moderation and limitations to the size of the tag cloud in the library catalogue affect the description of the information resource. An e-mail survey was conducted with personnel at LibraryThing, and the results were compared against tags for twenty different fiction books, collected from two different library catalogues with disparate tag cloud sizes, and LibraryThing’s web page. The data were analysed using a modified version of Golder and Huberman’s tag categories (2006). The results show that while LibraryThing claims to only remove the inherently personal tags, several other types of tags are found to have been discarded as well. Occasionally a certain type of tag is included in one book, and excluded in another. The comparison between the two tag cloud sizes suggests that the larger tag clouds provide a more pronounced picture regarding the contents of the book but at the cost of an increase in the number of tags with synonymous or redundant information.

  • Landqvist, Mats
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Semiotic spaces in antidiscriminatory political discourse: Naming practices as indexes2019In: Language in society (London. Print), ISSN 0047-4045, E-ISSN 1469-8013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the semiotic spaces occupied by organizations working against discrimination in Sweden. Expressions of identity, norm critique, and political goals are studied in relation to word production and language policy and planning. The study departs from interviews with representatives from three organizations within the hbtqi, antiracist, and disability movements. Other resources connected to them have also been analyzed, such as glossaries. Theoretically, this study draws on Yuri Lotman's concept of semiospheres, allowing the analysis to weigh in the whole semiotic process, including meaning production, policy work, and concrete word production. This approach completes an analysis of indexical orders. The results show that (a) organizations are aware of the importance of linguistic choices, (b) when new concepts and words are spread to the public, tension can arise and sometimes objections, and (c) word meanings change when used in public discourse. (Language policy and planning, semiosphere, indexical order, hbtqi, antiracism, disability, discrimination). 

  • Public defence: 2019-09-06 09:15 C2:305, Uppsala
    Carvalho, Carla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    The Role of Kidney Oxygen Homeostasis for the Development of Kidney Disease2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The relation between oxygen supply and demand determines tissue oxygen tension (PO2). When intrarenal tissue PO2 decreases, any compensatory increase in oxygen supply via increased renal blood flow is likely to increase glomerular filtration rate. The resulting increased tubular load of electrolytes destined for active transport increases oxygen consumption, thus affecting intrarenal tissue PO2. Consequently, the kidney is particularly sensitive to alterations in oxygen homeostasis and kidney hypoxia is acknowledged as a common pathway to end stage renal disease. Different factors that can affect intrarenal oxygen homeostasis, including alterations in blood pressure and sodium intake dietary or pathologies such as diabetes mellitus, anemia or atherosclerosis. This thesis focuses on understanding how these factors influence kidney oxygen homeostasis.

    Pronounced reduction in sodium intake caused tissue hypoxia in kidney cortex via activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone leading to increased tubular sodium reabsorption. Angiotensin II and aldosterone affect kidney oxygen handling differently. Whereas angiotensin II mainly affects kidney oxygen delivery, aldosterone mainly affects oxygen consumption.

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) system is a cellular defense mechanism against prolonged hypoxia. Although diabetes causes intrarenal hypoxia, hyperglycemia per se also prevents HIF-activation. Therefore, the effects of type 1 diabetes were evaluated in genetically modified mice with chronic HIF-activation. Diabetic mice with globally increased HIF activity, due to heterozygote prolyl hydroxylase-2 deficiency, displayed reduced mitochondria leak respiration and preserved cortical PO2. Diabetic mice with kidney-specific HIF activation, due to homozygous deficiency of von Hippel-Lindau, developed reduced mitochondria leak respiration and reduced urinary albumin excretion.

    The normal age-related decline in kidney function has been proposed to be due to, at least in part, increased oxidative stress, which can induce mitochondrial leak respiration via activation of uncoupling proteins. Indeed, two-year old mice deficient of uncoupling protein-2 presented with improved mitochondria efficiency and reduced urinary protein excretion.

    Summarizing, the data presented in this thesis provide clear support for potent influence of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, HIF activation and mitochondria function on intrarenal oxygen availability. Maintaining kidney oxygen homeostasis may be a unifying strategy to protect kidney function.

  • Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Pedersen, Christina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Evaluating a model for the capacity building of midwifery eduators in Bangladesh through a blended, web-based master's programme2019In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1652022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: While setting international standards for midwifery education has attracted considerable global attention, the education and training of midwifery educators has been relatively neglected, particularly in low-resource settings where capacity building is crucial. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the expectations of midwifery educators in Bangladesh who took part in a blended web-based master's programme in SRHR and the extent to which these were realized after 12 months of part-time study. Methods: Both quantitative and qualitative methods have been used to collect data. A structured baseline questionnaire was distributed to all participants at the start of the first course (n = 30) and a second endpoint questionnaire was distributed after they (n = 29) had completed the core courses one year later. At the start of the first course, five focus group discussions (FGD) were held with the midwifery educators. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used for the analyses. Results: Midwifery educators who took part in the study identified expectations that can be grouped into three distinct areas. They hoped to become more familiar with technology, anticipated they would learn pedagogical and other skills that would enable them to better support their students' learning and thought they might acquire skills to empower their students as human beings. Participants reported they realized these ambitions, attributing the master's programme with helping them take responsibility for their own teaching and learning, showing them how to enhance their students' learning and how to foster reflective and critical thinking among them. Conclusions: Midwifery educators have taken part in a creative learning environment which has developed their engagement in teaching and learning. They have done this using a blended learning model which combines online learning with face-to-face contact. This model can be scaled up in low resource and remote settings.