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  • Biörnstad, Arne
    The Nordic Museum.
    Att flytta hus till museum1974In: Fataburen: Nordiska museets och Skansens årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1974, p. 107-122Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Biörnstad, Arne
    The Nordic Museum.
    Handlagets bank1974In: Fataburen: Nordiska museets och Skansens årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1974, p. 101-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Andrén, Erik
    The Nordic Museum.
    Skråtidens byggnadhantverkare1974In: Fataburen: Nordiska museets och Skansens årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1974, p. 69-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Bedoire, Fredric
    Arkivguide för byggnadsforskare1974In: Fataburen: Nordiska museets och Skansens årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1974, p. 29-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Grandien, Bo
    The Nordic Museum.
    Svensk monumentvård under 100 år: några anteckningar1974In: Fataburen: Nordiska museets och Skansens årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1974, p. 7-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Popov, Vladimir V.
    et al.
    Israel Institute of Metals, Haifa, Israel.
    Katz-Demyanetz, Alexander
    Israel Institute of Metals, Haifa, Israel.
    Koptioug, Andrei
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Bamberger, Menachem
    Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.
    Selective electron beam melting of Al0.5CrMoNbTa0.5 high entropy alloys using elemental powder blend2019In: Heliyon, ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 5, no 2, article id e01188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High Entropy Alloys (HEAs) is a novel promising class of multi-component materials which may demonstrate superior mechanical properties useful for high-temperature applications. Despite the high potential of HEAs, their production is complicated, using pre-alloyed powders in powder metallurgy route. This significantly complicates development and implementation of refractory BCC solid solution based HEAs. The present paper reports on experiments aiming at production of Al0.5CrMoNbTa0.5 multi-principle alloy using powder bed beam based additive manufacturing. Samples were manufactured using Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM) additive manufacturing technique from a blend of elemental powders aiming at achieving microstructure with high configurational entropy. Though it was not possible to achieve completely homogeneous microstructure, the as-printed material was composed of the zones with two multi-component solid solutions, which differed only by Al content confirming in situ alloying. The process parameters optimization was not carried out and the as-print material contained a notable amount of residual porosity. It was possible to reach lower porosity level using heat treatment at 1300 °C for 24 hours, however undesirable alloy composition changes took place. The main conclusion is that the production of the Al0.5CrMoNbTa0.5 multi-principle alloy from elemental powder blends using SEBM technique is achievable, but the process parameter optimization rather than post-process heat treatment should be performed to reduce the porosity of samples. 

  • Amiandamhen, Stephen
    et al.
    University of Benin, Nigeria.
    Izekor, David
    University of Benin, Nigeria.
    Effect of wood particle geometry and pre-treatments on the strength and sorption properties of cement-bonded particle boards2013In: Journal of Applied and Natural Science, ISSN 0974-9411, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 318-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of particle geometry and pretreatments on the strength and sorption properties of wood particlecement composite boards was investigated. Wood particles (flakes and sawdust) of Gmelina arborea were mixedwith cement and water in the production of composite boards. The wood particles were pretreated with hot water,calcium chloride and a combination of both treatments to enhance bonding with cement. The slurry was poured intorectangular moulds for board formation. After demoulding, the boards formed were tested for modulus of rupture(MOR), modulus of elasticity (MOE), water absorption (WA) and thickness swelling (TS). The results revealed thatthe mean MOR for flakes boards was 3.23N mm-2 while the mean MOR for sawdust boards was 3.01N mm-2. Hotwater and calcium chloride treatment produced the best effect in flake composite boards with MOR and MOE valuesof 6.90 N/mm2 and 1897.36 N mm-2 while sawdust composite boards had mean MOR and MOE values of 5.69Nmm-2 and 1664.31N mm-2 respectively. The WA rate after 24 hours of flakes and sawdust boards treated with hotwater and calcium chloride was 3.63% and 4.28% while the TS rate was 0.69% and 1.44% respectively. Particlegeometry and pretreatments significantly improved strength and sorption properties of wood particle cementcomposite boards (p<0.05).

  • Rantala, Andreas
    et al.
    Lund University & Linneaus University.
    Behm, Lina
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science. Lund University.
    Rosén, Helena
    Lund University.
    Quality is in the eye of the beholder: a focus group study from the perspective of ambulance clinicians, physicians, and managers2019In: Healthcare (Basel, Switzerland), ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 7, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality within all areas of healthcare should be systemically monitored and ensured. However, the definition of quality is complex and diverse. In the ambulance service (AS), quality has traditionally been defined as response time, but this measurement eliminates the possibility of addressing other characteristics of quality, such as the care provided. This study aimed to explore what constitutes quality in the context of the ambulance service as experienced by ambulance clinicians, physicians, and managers. A focus group study was conducted with 18 participants. The three focus groups were analyzed with the focus group method developed by Kreuger and Casey. The participants highlighted patient involvement, information and care, as well as adherence to policies, regulations, and their own standards as representing quality in the AS. This study demonstrates that quality is in the eye of the beholder. As quality seems to be viewed similarly by patients and ambulance clinicians, physicians, and managers, stakeholders should aim for a paradigm shift where patients' experience of the care is just as important as various time measures.

  • Public defence: 2019-04-12 13:15 Robergsalen, Uppsala
    Nilsson, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    On Virtual Surgical Planning in Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex three-dimensional (3D) anatomy of the cranio-maxillofacial (CMF) region makes surgery a challenging task. Virtual surgical planning (VSP) has the potential to increase accuracy, reproducibility and shorten operation time. Key challenges in VSP are to accurately separate, or segment, certain structures of interest, such as the orbit, from the rest of the image, as well as to create an accurate 3D model of the facial bones and dentition for orthognathic surgery planning. The time required for planning and fabrication of guides for trauma surgery is another challenge. The overall aim of this thesis was to develop and evaluate new virtual planning tools for CMF-surgery and to investigate their usefulness. Study I, II discuss and evaluate image fusion of CT/CBCT and intraoral scanning for orthognathic surgery. A method for virtual bite registration in centric relation (CR) was also proposed. The workflow has the potential to eliminate traditional laboratory work, and may facilitate 3D computer-assisted-planning in orthognathic surgery. Study III deals with orbit segmentation and presents a semi-automatic method, using a deformable model tracing the inside of the orbit via haptic 3D interaction. The method was validated in retrospective unilateral orbital fracture cases. The fractured orbits were compared to the intact side by volume and shape analyses. The method showed high accuracy, precision, time-efficiency and thereby potential to be a powerful tool for planning and evaluating reconstruction of orbital fractures. Study IV evaluates an in-house haptic-assisted VSP system for complex mandibular fractures on a series of retrospective cases and an artificial case. The system showed high precision and time-efficiency, but relatively low accuracy. This study proposes a novel, fast and user-friendly way of integrating VSP into planning mandible trauma surgery and could help in reducing operating time and increase accuracy. Study V is a systematic review and meta-analysis studying potential time benefits using VSP in CMF surgery. The study suggests that VSP shortens the operating time and ischemia time for reconstructive surgery. VSP also appears to shorten the preoperative planning time for orthognathic surgery.

  • Jakobsson, Mikael (Editor)
    Westerlind, Ann Mari (Editor)
    Kulturmiljöns hantering i MKB-processen: delrapport från projektet MKB med kulturvärde2004 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • Berkesand, Peter
    Linköping University, University Library.
    Linköping University Electronic Press: ett icke-kommersiellt open access-förlag2018In: Ett bibliotek i takt med tiden: Linköpings universitetsbibliotek 50 år / [ed] Peter Igelström och Christina Brage, Linköping: Linköpings universitetsbibliotek , 2018, p. 113-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    För dagens forskare är synlighet av avgörande betydelse och ett viktigt led i detta är att ens publikationer ska vinna spridning och vara tillgängliga för en så stor läsekrets som möjligt. Som ett av de första i sitt slag i världen startades 1996 Linköping University Electronic Press (LiU E-Press) med syftet att tillgodose Linköpings universitets behov av elektronisk publicering och för att tillhandhålla stöd och service till forskare och studenter om LiU:s publiceringsstrategi. Förlaget är sedan 2004 knutet till Linköpings universitetsbibliotek (LiUB).

    Ambitionen med detta kapitel är att i stora drag skildra förlagets tillkomst, personal, de tjänster och resurser som förlaget erbjuder och inte minst den process som LiU E-Press gått igenom alltsedan det grundades 1996. Framställningen gör inte anspråk på att vara vetenskaplig eller heltäckande.

  • Bertilsson, Ulf
    et al.
    Fredell, Åsa
    RockCare - Tanum Laboratory of Cultural Heritage: report from the documentation seminars in Tanum 8-21 July and Valcamonica 29 July-14 August, 20002003 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • Bengtsson, Bengt
    The Nordic Museum.
    Skansens stadskvarter som levande miljö1972In: Fataburen: Nordiska museets och Skansens årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1972, p. 113-118Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Brage, Christina
    Linköping University, University Library.
    Centrum för biblioteks- och IT-pedagogik (CeBIT)2018In: Ett bibliotek i takt med tiden: Linköpings universitetsbibliotek 50 år / [ed] Peter Igelström och Christina Brage, Linköping: Linköpings universitetsbibliotek , 2018, p. 106-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    CeBIT startade sin verksamhet den 1 april 2000 som en enhet inom Linköpings universitetsbibliotek (LiUB). Agneta Lantz, Christina Brage och Tommy Carlberg var de som planerade den kommande verksamheten. Agneta kom sedan att bli föreståndare för CeBIT. Under åren som gick växte verksamheten och fick ett positivt gensvar både från studenter och från lärarhåll. Centrets övergripande målsättning var att fungera som ett samlande organ för LiUB:s pedagogiska verksamhet och som en spjutspets för pedagogisk förnyelse och utveckling. Man verkade för att utveckla den egna bibliotekarieprofessionen och förbättra informationskompetensen hos bibliotekets användare. Då kompetensförsörjning troligen är den viktigaste frågan för att säkra kvalitet i en organisation måste det finnas utvecklingsmöjligheter i arbetet för personalen, vilket i högsta grad var ett ledord för CeBIT.

    Under uppbyggnadsfasen lades krafterna framför allt på att utveckla och genomföra poänggivande kurser, dels inom programmet för Informations- och medievetenskap (IMV), dels fristående. I CeBIT fanns en viktig resurs i arbetet med att höja beredskapen för det livslånga lärandet. Arbetet med att höja studenternas informationskompetens innebar en breddad pedagogisk uppgift för universitetsbiblioteket, vilket i sin tur ställde högre krav på bibliotekariernas pedagogiska kompetens. Detta gällde i alla planerade och oplanerade möten med bibliotekets användare i informations- och lånediskar, per telefon och via e-post liksom i den regelrätta undervisningen i informationssökning. CeBIT kom att kombinera två områden av stort intresse för bibliotekarier – pedagogik och informationskompetens.

  • Linder, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Linder, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Månsson, Christopher
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Treatment of de Garengeot's hernia: a meta-analysis2019In: Hernia, ISSN 1265-4906, E-ISSN 1248-9204, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 131-141Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purposede Garengeot's hernia is a rare entity in which the appendix is located within a femoral hernia and is almost invariably encountered incarcerated in an emergency setting with concomitant appendicitis. In the literature, there are mostly single-case reports. The purpose of the present study was to perform a review of the literature to study the incidence, pathogenesis, demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory and radiological investigations, differential diagnosis, delay in diagnosis and treatment, operative findings, surgical technique, histological findings, the postoperative course, use of antibiotics, and complications regarding de Garengeot's hernia.MethodsA literature search was performed through PubMed with the following search terms, single or in combination: Garengeot, femoral hernia, and appendicitis. Additional references were also found within the articles, and two patients from Uppsala University Hospital were added.ResultsBetween 1981 and 2016, 70 publications were identified, and with the additional two patients, the present series comprised 90 patients There were 75 women (median age 73.0years) and 15 men (median age 78.0years). On examination, an inguinal mass was found in 87 patients (97%), which was painful and the cause of primary complaint in 67 patients (74%): the median duration of symptoms was 3days. Radiological investigations or ultrasound were performed in 67 patients (74%); computed tomography was the most accurate with a positive diagnosis in 23/34 patients. Appendicitis was found in 76 patients, gangrenous in 23, and perforated in 9. The surgical approach was inguinal in 76 patients, including 15 with concomitant laparotomy. The preperitoneal route was chosen in six patients, and laparoscopy alone in four patients. A mesh/plug was used in 22 patients (7/22 normal appendix) and suture repair in 59 (4/59 normal appendix: p<0.01). Complications were analysed in 79 patients and occurred in 11%. There was no mortality.Conclusionsde Garengeot's hernia is rare, being indistinguishable from an incarcerated femoral hernia in general. A delay in surgery should be avoided but if needed, computed tomography may be used for differential diagnosis. Although there is no standard treatment, mesh material does not appear advisable in the presence of a perforation, and it is beneficial for the surgeons to perform their routine method rather than a specific technique.

  • Asp, Eva (Editor)
    Bildbruk med mening2003Book (Other academic)
  • Söderström, Johanna
    et al.
    Department of Government, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åkebo, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Jarstad, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Department of Government, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Friends, Fellows and Foes: A new framework for studying relational peace2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we suggest that taking a relational view of peace serious is a fruitful avenue for expanding current theoretical frameworks surrounding peace as a concept. Paving the way for such an approach, this paper conducts a review of the literature which takes on peace as a relational concept. We then return to how a relationship is conceptualized, before turning to how such components would be further defined in order to specify relational peace. Based on this framework, we argue that a peaceful relation entails non-domination, deliberation and cooperation between the actors in the dyad, the actors involved recognize and trust each other and believe that the relationship is one between legitimate actors and ultimately an expression of friendship. It clarifies the methodological implications of studying peace in this manner. It also demonstrates some of the advantages of this approach, as it shows how peace and war can co-exist in webs of multiple interactions, and the importance of studying relations, and how actors understand these relationships, as a way of studying varieties of peace.

  • Olsson, Jan
    et al.
    Umeå Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Virol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Johansson, Jörgen
    Umeå Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Umeå, Sweden; Umeå Univ Hosp, Lab Med, Clin Microbiol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Honkala, Emma
    Umeå Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Blomqvist, Bert
    Umeå Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Umeå, Sweden; Umeå Univ Hosp, Lab Med, Clin Microbiol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kok, Eloise
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Tampere, Finland.
    Weidung, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Lovheim, Hugo
    Umeå Univ, Community Med & Rehabil, Geriatr Med, Umeå, Sweden.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Umeå Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Urea dilution of serum for reproducible anti-HSV1 IgG avidity index2019In: BMC Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1471-2334, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 19, article id 164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), establishes life-long latency and can cause symptoms during both first-time infection and later reactivation. The aim of the present study was to describe a protocol to generate a reliable and discriminative avidity index (AI) for anti-HSV1 IgG content in human sera.

    Methods: Human serum from two distinct cohorts; one a biobank collection (Betula) (n = 28), and one from a clinical diagnostics laboratory at Northern Sweden University Hospital (NUS) (n = 18), were assessed for presence of IgG antibodies against HSV1 by a commercially available ELISA-kit. Addition of urea at the incubation step reduces effective binding, and the ratio between urea treated sample and non-treated sample was used to express an avidity index (AI) for individual samples.

    Results: AI score ranged between 43.2 and 73.4% among anti-HSV1 positive biobank sera. Clinical samples ranged between 36.3 and 74.9%. Reproducibility expressed as an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was estimated at 0.948 (95% CI: 0.900–0.979) and 0.989 (95% CI 0.969–0.996) in the biobank and clinical samples, respectively.

    Conclusion: The method allows for AI scoring of anti-HSV1 IgG from individual human sera with a single measurement. The least significant change between two measurements at the p < 0.05 level was estimated at 5.4 and 3.2 points, respectively, for the two assessed cohorts.

  • Pennells, Lisa
    et al.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Kaptoge, Stephen
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Wood, Angela
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Sweeting, Mike
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Zhao, Xiaohui
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Physiol Dev & Neurosci, Downing St, Cambridge CB2 3EG, England.
    White, Ian
    UCL, MRC Clin Trials Unit, 90 High Holborn, London WC1V 6LJ, England.
    Burgess, Stephen
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Univ Cambridge, Cambridge Inst Publ Hlth, MRC Biostat Unit, Forvie Site,Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0SR, England.
    Willeit, Peter
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Neurol & Neurosurg, Anichstra 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Bolton, Thomas
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Moons, Karel G. M.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Julius Ctr, Res Program Methodol, Epidemiol Methodol, Heidelberglaan 100, NL-3584 Utrecht, Netherlands.
    van der Schouw, Yvonne T.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Julius Ctr, Res Program Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Dept Epidemiol, Heidelberglaan 100, NL-3584 Utrecht, Netherlands;ProspectEPIC, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Selmer, Randi
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Epidemiol, Postboks 222 Skoyen, N-0213 Oslo, Norway.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;EPICNOR, London, England;RANCHO, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Iceland Heart Assoc, Hjartavernd Holtasmari 1, IS-201 Kopavogur, Iceland;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Vatnsmyrarvegur 16, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Assmann, Gerd
    Assmann Fdn Prevent, Gronowskistr 33, D-48161 Munster, Germany;PROCAM, Newton, MA USA.
    Amouyel, Philippe
    Inst Pasteur, 1 Rue Professeur Calmette, F-59019 Lille, France;PRIME, Newton, MA USA.
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Nat Inst Hlth & Welf, Mannerheimintie 166, Helsinki 00271, Finland;KAREL72, Isa Town, Bahrain.
    Kivimaki, Mika
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, 1-19 Torrington Pl, London WC1E 7HB, England;WHITE I, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal.
    Nordestgaard, Borge G.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Med, Blegdamsvej 3, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Blaha, Michael J.
    Johns Hopkins Univ Hosp, Ciccarone Ctr Prevent Heart Dis, 1800 Orleans St, Baltimore, MD 21287 USA.
    Kuller, Lewis H.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Epidemiol, 200 Lothrop St, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 USA;MRFIT, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Neuenheimer Feld 581, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Grabengasse 1, D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany;WCWC, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal.
    Gillum, Richard F.
    Howard Univ, Coll Med, Dept Med, 2041 Georgia Ave, Washington, DC 20060 USA;NHANES III, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Meisinger, Christa
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Ingolstadter Landstr 1, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany;MONICA KORA2, Karachi, Pakistan;MONICA KORA3, Karachi, Pakistan.
    Ford, Ian
    Univ Glasgow, Inst Hlth & Wellbeing, Boyd Orr Bldg,Univ Ave, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Lanark, Scotland;WOSCOPS, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal.
    Knuiman, Matthew W.
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, 35 Stirling Highway, Perth, WA 6009, Australia;BHS, London, England.
    Rosengren, Annika
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Medicinaregatan 3, S-41390 Gothenburg, Sweden;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Wallenberg Lab, Bla Stradket 5, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden;GOT043, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland;MOSWEGOT, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Lawlor, Debbie A.
    Univ Bristol, Dept Social Med, Bristol BS8 2PR, Avon, England.
    Volzke, Henry
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Ellernholzstr 1-2, D-17489 Greifswald, Germany.
    Cooper, Cyrus
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Tremona Rd, Southampton SO16 6YD, Hants, England.
    Ibanez, Alejandro Marin
    San Jose Norte Hlth Ctr, 16 Lugar Santuario Cabanas, Zaragoza 50013, Spain.
    Casiglia, Edoardo
    Univ Padua, Dept Med, 2 Via Giustiniani, I-35128 Padua, Italy;CASTEL, New York, NY USA.
    Kauhanen, Jussi
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Publ Hlth & Clin Nutr, 1 Yliopistonranta, Kuopio, Finland.
    Cooper, Jackie A.
    UCL, Ctr Cardiovasc Genet, 5 Univ St, London WC1E 6JF, England;NPHSII, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Rodriguez, Beatriz
    Univ Hawaii, Dept Geriatr Med, 1960 East West Rd, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA;HONOL, Tokyo, Japan.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth
    Univ Calif San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA.
    Dankner, Rachel
    Gertner Inst Epidemiol & Hlth Policy Res, Sheba Med Ctr, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, IL-52621 Tel Hashomer, Israel;Tel Aviv Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Sackler Fac Med, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent Med, IL-69978 Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Nietert, Paul J.
    Med Univ South Carolina, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, 135 Cannon St, Charleston, SC 29425 USA;CHARL, Greenville, SC USA.
    Davidson, Karina W.
    Columbia Univ Irving Med Ctr, Dept Med, 622 West 168th St, New York, NY 10032 USA.
    Wallace, Robert B.
    Univ Iowa, Coll Publ Hlth, 145 N Riverside Dr, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA.
    Blazer, Dan G.
    Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Surg, 2301 Erwin Rd, Durham, NC 27707 USA.
    Bjorkelund, Cecilia
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Medicinaregatan 16, S-41390 Gothenburg, Sweden;GOTOW, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland.
    Donfrancesco, Chiara
    ISS, Dysmetabol & Aging Associated Dis, Dept Cardiovasc, 299 Viale Regina Elena, I-00161 Rome, Italy;FINE IT, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Krumholz, Harlan M.
    Yale Sch Med, 1 Church St, New Haven, CT 06510 USA.
    Nissinen, Aulikki
    Nat Inst Hlth & Welf, Mannerheimintie 166, Helsinki 00271, Finland;FINE FIN, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Davis, Barry R.
    Univ Texas Houston, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, 1200 Pressler St, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Coady, Sean
    NHLBI, Div Cardiovasc Sci, 31 Ctr Dr, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Whincup, Peter H.
    St Georges Univ London, Populat Hlth Res Inst, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE, England;BRHS, Bridgewater, MA USA.
    Jorgensen, Torben
    Res Ctr Prevent & Hlth, 5 Oster Farimagsgade, DK-1014 Copenhagen, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Dept Publ Hlth, 5 Oster Farimagsgade, DK-1014 Copenhagen, Denmark;Aalborg Univ, Fredrik Bajers Vej 5, DK-9100 Aalborg, Denmark.
    Ducimetiere, Pierre
    Univ Paris 05, Fac Med, 12 Rue Ecole Med, F-75006 Paris, France.
    Trevisan, Maurizio
    CUNY, Sch Med, City Coll New York, 160 Convent Ave, New York, NY 10031 USA;RIFLE, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Engstrom, Gunnar
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden.
    Crespo, Carlos J.
    Portland State Univ, Sch Community Hlth, 506 SW Mill St, Portland, OR 97201 USA;PRHHP, Newton, MA USA.
    Meade, Tomw.
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Noncommunicable Dis Epidemiol, Keppel St, London WC1E 7HT, England.
    Visser, Marjolein
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, VU Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Hlth Sci, De Boelelaan 1085, NL-1081 Amsterdam, Netherlands;LASA, Karachi, Pakistan.
    Kromhout, Daan
    Univ Grogingen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, Hanzepl 1, NL-9713 Groningen, Netherlands.
    Kiechl, Stefan
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Neurol & Neurosurg, Anichstra 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    Daimon, Makoto
    Yamagata Univ, Fac Med, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa Machi, Yamagata 9908560, Japan.
    Price, Jackie F.
    Univ Edinburgh, Old Med Sch, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Teviot Pl, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, Midlothian, Scotland.
    de la Camara, Agustin Gomez
    Hosp 12 Octubre, Dept Clin Res, Av Cordoba, E-28041 Madrid, Spain;DRECE, Madrid, Spain.
    Jukema, J. Wouter
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 Leiden, Netherlands.
    Lamarche, Benoit
    Univ Laval, Pavillon Ferdinand Vandry,2440 Hochelaga, Quebec City, PQ G1V 0A6, Canada.
    Onat, Altan
    Istanbul Univ, Cerrahpasa Fac Med, Dept Cardiol, TR-34452 Istanbul, Turkey.
    Simons, Leon A.
    UNSW, Fac Med, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.
    Kavousi, Maryam
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Doctor Molewaterpl 40, NL-3015 Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Ben-Shlomo, Yoav
    Univ Bristol, Bristol Neurosci, Queens Rd, Bristol BS8 1QU, Avon, England;CAPS, Oxford, England.
    Gallacher, John
    Univ Oxford, Warneford Hosp, Dept Psychiat, Warneford Lane, Oxford OX3 7JX, England;CAPS, Oxford, England.
    Dekker, Jacqueline M.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Inst Hlth & Care Res, De Boelelaan 1085, NL-1081 Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Arima, Hisatomi
    Kyushu Univ, Nishi Ku, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 8190395, Japan.
    Shara, Nawar
    MedStar Hlth Res Inst, Dept Biostat & Bioinformat, 6525 Belcrest Rd, Hyattsville, MD 20782 USA.
    Tipping, RobertW.
    Merck, Clin Biostat, 2000 Galloping Hill Rd, Kenilworth, NJ 07033 USA.
    Roussel, Ronan
    INSERM, Ctr Rech Cordeliers, 15 Rue Ecole Med, F-57006 Paris, France.
    Brunner, Eric J.
    UCL, Inst Epidemiol & Hlth, 1-19 Torrington Pl, London WC1E 7HB, England;WHITE II, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal.
    Koenig, Wolfgang
    Tech Univ Munich, Deutsches Herzzentrum Munchen, 21 Arcisstr, D-80333 Munich, Germany;DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Biedersteiner Str 29, D-80802 Munich, Germany;MONICA KORA2, Karachi, Pakistan;MONICA KORA3, Karachi, Pakistan.
    Sakurai, Masaru
    Kanazawa Med Univ, Dept Social & Environm Med, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 9200293, Japan.
    Pavlovic, Jelena
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Doctor Molewaterpl 40, NL-3015 Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Gansevoort, Ron T.
    Univ Grogingen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Internal Med, Hanzeplein 1, NL-9713 Groningen, Netherlands.
    Nagel, Dorothea
    Univ Munich, Klinikum Univ Munchen, 15 Marchioninistr, D-81377 Munich, Germany;GRIPS, Tokyo, Japan.
    Goldbourt, Uri
    Tel Aviv Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Sackler Fac Med, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent Med, IL-69978 Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Barr, Elizabeth L. M.
    Baker Heart & Diabet Inst, Clin Diabet & Epidemiol, 75 Commercial Rd, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia.
    Palmieri, Luigi
    ISS, Dysmetabol & Aging Associated Dis, Dept Cardiovasc, 299 Viale Regina Elena, I-00161 Rome, Italy;CUORE, Madrid, Spain.
    Njolstad, Inger
    Univ Tromso, Dept Publ Hlth, Hansine Hansens Veg 18, Tromso, Norway.
    Sato, Shinichi
    Chiba Prefectural Inst Publ Hlth, Chuo Ku, 666-2 Nito No Machi, Chiba 2608715, Japan;IKNS, Isa Town, Bahrain.
    Verschuren, W. M. Monique
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth & Environm RIVM, Dept Determinants Chron Dis, Antonie Leeuwenhoeklaan 9, NL-3721 Bilthoven, Netherlands;MCVDRFP, Karachi, Pakistan;MORGEN, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Varghese, Cherian V.
    WHO, Noncommunicable Dis Disabil Violence & Injury Pre, 20 Ave Appia, CH-1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland.
    Graham, Ian
    Univ Dublin, Coll Green, Trinity Coll Dublin, Sch Med, Dublin 2, Ireland.
    Onuma, Oyere
    WHO, Noncommunicable Dis Disabil Violence & Injury Pre, 20 Ave Appia, CH-1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland.
    Greenland, Philip
    Northwestern Univ, Feinberg Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 420 East Super St, Chicago, IL 60611 USA.
    Woodward, Mark
    Univ Oxford, George Inst Global Hlth, 75 George St, Oxford OX1 2BQ, England;Univ New South Wales, George Inst Global Hlth, 1 King St Newtown, Sydney, NSW 2042, Australia.
    Ezzati, Majid
    Imperial Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, Fac Med, Norfolk Pl,St Marys Campus, London W2 1PG, England.
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Univ Washington, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, 1730 Minor Ave, Seattle, WA 98101 USA;CHS, Inver Grove Hts, MN USA.
    Sattar, Naveed
    Univ Glasgow, Inst Cardiovasc & Med Sci, 126 Univ Pl, Glasgow G12 8TA, Lanark, Scotland;MIDFAM, Karachi, Pakistan;WOSCOPS, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal.
    Jackson, Rod
    Univ Auckland, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, 261 Morrin Rd, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Ridker, Paul M.
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, 900 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02215 USA;USPHS2, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal;WHS, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal.
    Cook, Nancy R.
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, 900 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    D'Agostino, Ralph B., Sr.
    Boston Univ, Math & Stat Dept, 111 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA 02215 USA;FRAM, Boston, MA USA;FRAMOFF, Boston, MA USA.
    Thompson, Simon G.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Danesh, John
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Di Angelantonio, Emanuele
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Tipping, Robert W.
    AFTCAPS, Benn, Germany.
    Simpson, Lara M.
    ALLHAT, Bethesda, MD USA.
    Pressel, Sara L.
    ALLHAT, Bethesda, MD USA.
    Couper, David J.
    ARIC, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Nambi, Vijay
    ARIC, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Matsushita, Kunihiro
    ARIC, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Folsom, Aaron R.
    ARIC, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Shaw, Jonathan E.
    AUSDIAB, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Magliano, Dianna J.
    AUSDIAB, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Zimmet, Paul Z.
    AUSDIAB, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Wannamethee, S. Goya
    BRHS, Bridgewater, MA USA.
    Willeit, Johann
    BRUN, Bridgewater, MA USA.
    Santer, Peter
    BRUN, Bridgewater, MA USA.
    Egger, Georg
    BRUN, Bridgewater, MA USA.
    Casas, Juan Pablo
    BWHHS, London, England.
    Amuzu, Antointtte
    BWHHS, London, England.
    Tikhonoff, Valerie
    CASTEL, New York, NY USA.
    Sutherland, Susan E.
    CHARL, Greenville, SC USA.
    Cushman, Mary
    CHS, Inver Grove Hts, MN USA.
    Sogaard, Anne Johanne
    CONOR, Tromso, Norway.
    Haheim, Lise Lund
    CONOR, Tromso, Norway.
    Ariansen, Inger
    CONOR, Tromso, Norway.
    Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne
    COPEN, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Jensen, Gorm B.
    COPEN, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Schnohr, Peter
    COPEN, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Giampaoli, Simona
    CUORE, Madrid, Spain;FINE IT, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Vanuzzo, Diego
    CUORE, Madrid, Spain.
    Panico, Salvatore
    CUORE, Madrid, Spain.
    Balkau, Beverley
    DESIR, Madrid, Spain.
    Bonnet, Fabrice
    DESIR, Madrid, Spain.
    Marre, Michel
    DESIR, Madrid, Spain.
    Herrera, Miguel Angel Rubio
    DRECE, Madrid, Spain.
    Friedlander, Yechiel
    McCallum, John
    McLachlan, Stela
    EAS, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Guralnik, Jack
    EPESEBOS, London, England;EPESEIOW, Baltimore, MD USA;EPESENCA, Oxford, England;EPESENHA, New York, NY USA.
    Phillips, Caroline L.
    EPESEBOS, London, England.
    Wareham, Nick
    EPICNOR, London, England.
    Schottker, Ben
    ESTHER, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Saum, Kai-Uwe
    ESTHER, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Holleczek, Bernd
    ESTHER, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Tolonen, Hanna
    FINE FIN, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Jousilahti, Pekka
    FINRISK 92 97, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Harald, Kennet
    FINRISK 92 97, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Massaro, Joseph M.
    FRAM, Boston, MA USA;FRAMOFF, Boston, MA USA.
    Pencina, Michael
    FRAM, Boston, MA USA;FRAMOFF, Boston, MA USA.
    Vasan, Ramachandran
    FRAM, Boston, MA USA;FRAMOFF, Boston, MA USA.
    Kayama, Takamasa
    Kato, Takeo
    Oizumi, Toshihide
    Jespersen, Jorgen
    Moller, Lars
    Bladbjerg, Else Marie
    Chetrit, A.
    GOH, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland.
    Wilhelmsen, Lars
    GOT043, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland.
    Lissner, Lauren
    GOTOW, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland.
    Dennison, Elaine
    HCS, Tokyo, Japan.
    Kiyohara, Yutaka
    Ninomiya, Toshiharu
    Doi, Yasufumi
    Nijpels, Giel
    Stehouwer, Coen D. A.
    Kazumasa, Yamagishi
    IKNS, Isa Town, Bahrain.
    Iso, Hiroyasu
    IKNS, Isa Town, Bahrain.
    Vartiainen, Erkki
    FINRISK 92 97, Heidelberg, Germany;KAREL72, Isa Town, Bahrain.
    Kurl, Sudhir
    KIHD, Karachi, Pakistan.
    Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka
    KIHD, Karachi, Pakistan.
    Salonen, Jukka T.
    KIHD, Karachi, Pakistan.
    Deeg, Dorly J. H.
    LASA, Karachi, Pakistan.
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Hedblad, Bo
    Melander, Olle
    De Boer, Ian H.
    DeFilippis, Andrew Paul
    Watt, Graham
    MIDFAM, Karachi, Pakistan.
    Verschuren, Monique
    Tverdal, Aage
    NCS, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Kirkland, Susan
    NSHS, Newton, MA USA.
    Shimbo, Daichi
    NSHS, Newton, MA USA.
    Shaffer, Jonathan
    NSHS, Newton, MA USA.
    Bakker, Stephan J. L.
    PREVEND, Newton, MA USA.
    van der Harst, Pim
    PREVEND, Newton, MA USA.
    Hillege, Hans L.
    PREVEND, Newton, MA USA.
    Dallongeville, Jean
    PRIME, Newton, MA USA.
    Schulte, Helmut
    PROCAM, Newton, MA USA.
    Trompet, Stella
    PROSPER, Newton, MA USA.
    Smit, Roelof A. J.
    PROSPER, Newton, MA USA.
    Stott, David J.
    PROSPER, Newton, MA USA.
    Despres, Jean-Pierre
    Cantin, Bernard
    Dagenais, Gilles R.
    Laughlin, Gail
    RANCHO, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Wingard, Deborah
    RANCHO, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Aspelund, Thor
    REYK, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Eiriksdottir, Gudny
    REYK, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Gudmundsson, Elias Freyr
    Ikram, Arfan
    van Rooij, Frank J. A.
    Franco, Oscar H.
    Rueda-Ochoa, Oscar L.
    Muka, Taulant
    Glisic, Marija
    Tunstall-Pedoe, Hugh
    Howard, Barbara V.
    Zhang, Ying
    Jolly, Stacey
    Davey-Smith, George
    Can, Gunay
    Yuksel, Husniye
    Nakagawa, Hideaki
    Morikawa, Yuko
    Miura, Katsuyuki
    Ingelsson, Martin
    ULSAM, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal.
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    ULSAM, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal.
    Gaziano, J. Michael
    USPHS2, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal.
    Shipley, Martin
    WHITE I, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal;WHITE II, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal.
    Arndt, Volker
    WCWC, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal.
    Cook, Nancy
    WHS, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal.
    Geleijnse, Johanna M.
    ZUTE, Viana Do Castelo, Portugal.
    Equalization of four cardiovascular risk algorithms after systematic recalibration: individual-participant meta-analysis of 86 prospective studies2019In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 621-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: There is debate about the optimum algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk estimation. We conducted head-to-head comparisons of four algorithms recommended by primary prevention guidelines, before and after ‘recalibration’, a method that adapts risk algorithms to take account of differences in the risk characteristics of the populations being studied.

    Methods and results: Using individual-participant data on 360 737 participants without CVD at baseline in 86 prospective studies from 22 countries, we compared the Framingham risk score (FRS), Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE), pooled cohort equations (PCE), and Reynolds risk score (RRS). We calculated measures of risk discrimination and calibration, and modelled clinical implications of initiating statin therapy in people judged to be at ‘high’ 10 year CVD risk. Original risk algorithms were recalibrated using the risk factor profile and CVD incidence of target populations. The four algorithms had similar risk discrimination. Before recalibration, FRS, SCORE, and PCE over-predicted CVD risk on average by 10%, 52%, and 41%, respectively, whereas RRS under-predicted by 10%. Original versions of algorithms classified 29–39% of individuals aged ≥40 years as high risk. By contrast, recalibration reduced this proportion to 22–24% for every algorithm. We estimated that to prevent one CVD event, it would be necessary to initiate statin therapy in 44–51 such individuals using original algorithms, in contrast to 37–39 individuals with recalibrated algorithms.

    Conclusion: Before recalibration, the clinical performance of four widely used CVD risk algorithms varied substantially. By contrast, simple recalibration nearly equalized their performance and improved modelled targeting of preventive action to clinical need.

  • Kawde, Anurag
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Chem, Umea, Sweden;ESRF, Grenoble, France.
    Annamalai, Alagappan
    Umea Univ, Dept Phys, Umea, Sweden.
    Sellstedt, Anita
    Umea Univ, Dept Plant Physiol, UPSC, Umea, Sweden.
    Glatzel, Pieter
    ESRF, Grenoble, France.
    Wagberg, Thomas
    Umea Univ, Dept Phys, Umea, Sweden.
    Messinger, Johannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics. Umea Univ, Dept Chem, Umea, Sweden.
    A microstructured p-Si photocathode outcompetes Pt as a counter electrode to hematite in photoelectrochemical water splitting2019In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 1166-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we communicate about an Earth-abundant semiconductor photocathode (p-Si/TiO2/NiOx) as an alternative for the rare and expensive Pt as a counter electrode for overall photoelectrochemical water splitting. The proposed photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting device mimics the Z-scheme observed in natural photosynthesis by combining two photoelectrodes in a parallel-illumination mode. A nearly 60% increase in the photocurrent density (J(ph)) for pristine -Fe2O3 and a 77% increase in the applied bias photocurrent efficiency (ABPE) were achieved by replacing the conventionally used Pt cathode with an efficient, cost effective p-Si/TiO2/NiOx photocathode under parallel illumination. The resulting photocurrent density of 1.26 mA cm(-2) at 1.23V(RHE) represents a new record performance for hydrothermally grown pristine -Fe2O3 nanorod photoanodes in combination with a photocathode, which opens the prospect for further improvement by doping -Fe2O3 or by its decoration with co-catalysts. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that this significant performance increase is due to the enhancement of the space-charge field in -Fe2O3.

  • Saeedian, Meysam
    et al.
    Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
    Pouresmaeil, Edris
    Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
    Samadaei, Emad
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Godinho Rodrigues, Eduardo Manuel
    Management and Production Technologies of Northern Aveiro—ESAN, Oliveira de Azeméis, Portugal.
    Godina, Radu
    New University of Lisbon, Caparica, Portugal.
    Marzband, Mousa
    Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    An innovative dual-boost nine-level inverter with low-voltage rating switches2019In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an innovative switched-capacitor based nine-level inverter employing single DC input for renewable and sustainable energy applications. The proposed configuration generates a step-up bipolar output voltage without end-side H-bridge, and the employed capacitors are charged in a self-balancing form. Applying low-voltage rated switches is another merit of the proposed inverter, which leads to extensive reduction in total standing voltage. Thereby, switching losses as well as inverter cost are reduced proportionally. Furthermore, the comparative analysis against other state-of-the-art inverters depicts that the number of required power electronic devices and implementation cost is reduced in the proposed structure. The working principle of the proposed circuit along with its efficiency calculations and thermal modeling are elaborated in detail. In the end, simulations and experimental tests are conducted to validate the flawless performance of the proposed nine-level topology in power systems.

  • Andersson, Gunnar
    Gravspråk som religiös strategi: Valsta och Skälby i Attundaland under vikingatid och tidig medeltid2005 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • Granberg, Mikael (Editor)
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Climate and Safety (from 2013).
    Göteborgsregionen och klimatrisker: Klimatrisker för dåtida och framtida bebyggelse2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport är slutrapporten från forskningsprojektet “Minskadeklimatrisker i framtidens bebyggelse och boende lärande från tidigarehändelser och samhällsplanering” som genomförts på Centrum förklimat och säkerhet mellan 2014 – 2018 och finansierats av StiftelsenLänsförsäkringsgruppens Forsknings- och Utvecklingsfond.Projektet har bestått av fem delstudier kring klimatriskhantering ochklimatanpassning i flera olika geografiska kontexter runt om i Sverige.Den studie av Göteborgsregionen som presenteras i denna rapport ärett sätt att skapa en syntes av de olika teoretiska och empiriskaingångarna i detta projekt genom en studie av den aktuellaproblematiken på en specifik plats.

    Mikael Granberg som står som redaktör för rapporten är professor istatsvetenskap och föreståndare för Centrum för klimat och säkerhet.

  • Holm, Jenny (Editor)
    Neolitiska nedslag: arkeologiska uppslag2005Book (Other academic)
  • Public defence: 2019-03-29 09:00 Granitsalen, Linköping
    Lentini, Antonio
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dynamic regulation of DNA methylation in human T-cell biology2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    T helper cells play a central role in orchestrating immune responses in humans. Upon encountering a foreign antigen, T helper cells are activated followed by a differentiation process where the cells are specialised to help combating the infection. Dysregulation of T helper cell activation, differentiation and function has been implicated in numerous diseases, including autoimmunity and cancer. Whereas gene-regulatory networks help drive T-cell differentiation, acquisition of stable cell states require heritable epigenetic signals, such as DNA methylation. Indeed, the establishment of DNA methylation patterns is a key part of appropriate T-cell differentiation but how this is regulated over time remains unknown. Methylation can be directly attached to cytosine residues in DNA to form 5-methylcytosine (5mC) but the removal of DNA methylation requires multiple enzymatic reactions, commonly initiated by the conversion into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), thus creating a highly complex regulatory system. This thesis aimed to investigate how DNA methylation is dynamically regulated during T-cell differentiation.

    To this end, we employed large-scale profiling techniques combining gene expression as well as genome-wide 5mC and 5hmC measurements to construct a time-series model of epigenetic regulation of differentiation. This revealed that early T-cell activation was accompanied by extensive genome-wide deposition of 5hmC which resulted in demethylation upon proliferation. Early DNA methylation remodelling through 5hmC was not only indicative of demethylation events during T-cell differentiation but also marked changes persisting longterm in memory T-cell subsets. These results suggest that priming of epigenetic landscapes in T-cells is initiated during early activation events, preceding any establishment of a stable lineage, which are then maintained throughout the cells lifespan. The regions undergoing remodelling were also highly enriched for genetic variants in autoimmune diseases which we show to be functional through disruption of protein binding. These variants could potentially disrupt gene-regulatory networks and the establishment of epigenetic priming, highlighting the complex interplay between genetic and epigenetic layers. In the course of this work, we discovered that a commonly used technique to study genome-wide DNA modifications, DNA immunoprecipitation (DIP)-seq, had a false discovery rate between 50-99% depending on the modification and cell type being assayed. This represented inherent technical errors related to the use of antibodies resulting in off-target binding of repetitive sequences lacking any DNA modifications. These sequences are common in mammalian genomes making robust detection of rare DNA modifications very difficult due to the high background signals. However, offtarget binding could easily be controlled for using a non-specific antibody control which greatly improved data quality and biological insight of the data. Although future studies are advised to use alternative methods where available, error correction is an acceptable alternative which will help fuel new discoveries through the removal of extensive background signals.

    Taken together, this thesis shows how integrative use of high-resolution epigenomic data can be used to study complex biological systems over time as well as how these techniques can be systematically characterised to identify and correct errors resulting in improved detection.

  • Engqvist, Carl-Erik (Author of introduction, etc.)
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    The Wise Eye2018Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • Corada, Monica
    et al.
    FIRC Inst Mol Oncol Fdn IFOM, Milan, Italy.
    Orsenigo, Fabrizio
    FIRC Inst Mol Oncol Fdn IFOM, Milan, Italy.
    Bhat, Ganesh Parameshwar
    Osped San Raffaele, Mol Neurobiol Lab, Div Neurosci, Milan, Italy.
    Conze, Lei Liu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Breviario, Ferruccio
    FIRC Inst Mol Oncol Fdn IFOM, Milan, Italy.
    Cunha, Sara I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Beznoussenko, Galina V.
    FIRC Inst Mol Oncol Fdn IFOM, Milan, Italy.
    Mironov, Alexander A.
    FIRC Inst Mol Oncol Fdn IFOM, Milan, Italy.
    Bacigaluppi, Marco
    Osped San Raffaele, Neuroimmunol Unit, Div Neurosci, Inst Expt Neurol, Milan, Italy.
    Martino, Gianvito
    Osped San Raffaele, Neuroimmunol Unit, Div Neurosci, Inst Expt Neurol, Milan, Italy.
    Pitulescu, Mara E.
    Univ Munster, Max Planck Inst Mol Biomed, Dept Tissue Morphogenesis, Munster, Germany; Univ Munster, Fac Med, Munster, Germany.
    Adams, Ralf H.
    Univ Munster, Max Planck Inst Mol Biomed, Dept Tissue Morphogenesis, Munster, Germany; Univ Munster, Fac Med, Munster, Germany.
    Magnusson, Peetra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Dejana, Elisabetta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. FIRC Inst Mol Oncol Fdn IFOM, Milan, Italy; Univ Milan, Dept Oncol & Hematooncol, Milan, Italy.
    Fine-Tuning of Sox17 and Canonical Wnt Coordinates the Permeability Properties of the Blood-Brain Barrier2019In: Circulation Research, ISSN 0009-7330, E-ISSN 1524-4571, Vol. 124, no 4, p. 511-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale: The microvasculature of the central nervous system includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which regulates the permeability to nutrients and restricts the passage of toxic agents and inflammatory cells. Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is responsible for the early phases of brain vascularization and BBB differentiation. However, this signal declines after birth, and other signaling pathways able to maintain barrier integrity at postnatal stage are still unknown.

    Objective: Sox17 (SRY [sex-determining region Y]-box 17) constitutes a major downstream target of Wnt/β-catenin in endothelial cells and regulates arterial differentiation. In the present article, we asked whether Sox17 may act downstream of Wnt/β-catenin in inducing BBB differentiation and maintenance.

    Methods and Results: Using reporter mice and nuclear staining of Sox17 and β-catenin, we report that although β-catenin signaling declines after birth, Sox17 activation increases and remains high in the adult. Endothelial-specific inactivation of Sox17 leads to increase of permeability of the brain microcirculation. The severity of this effect depends on the degree of BBB maturation: it is strong in the embryo and progressively declines after birth. In search of Sox17 mechanism of action, RNA sequencing analysis of gene expression of brain endothelial cells has identified members of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway as downstream targets of Sox17. Consistently, we found that Sox17 is a positive inducer of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and it acts in concert with this pathway to induce and maintain BBB properties. In vivo, inhibition of the β-catenin destruction complex or expression of a degradation-resistant β-catenin mutant, prevent the increase in permeability and retina vascular malformations observed in the absence of Sox17.

    Conclusions: Our data highlight a novel role for Sox17 in the induction and maintenance of the BBB, and they underline the strict reciprocal tuning of this transcription factor and Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Modulation of Sox17 activity may be relevant to control BBB permeability in pathological conditions.

  • Igelström, Peter
    Linköping University, University Library.
    LiUB blir pliktbibliotek2018In: Ett bibliotek i takt med tiden: Linköpings universitetsbibliotek 50 år / [ed] Peter Igelström och Christina Brage, Linköping: Linköpings universitetsbibliotek , 2018, p. 102-105Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Linköpings universitetsbibliotek (LiUB) blev genom en ny lag om pliktexemplar från och med januari 1979 det sjunde biblioteket i Sverige att motta pliktexemplar från landets tryckerier och förlag. På så vis kommer så gott som allt tryckt material som ges ut i landet biblioteket till del. Pliktleveranserna kom att fylla en viktig funktion för bibliotekets litteraturförsörjning men innefattade inte det bevarandeuppdrag som dittills gällt som pliktleveransernas huvudsyfte.

    Pliktleveranser reglerades från början i 1661 års kansliordning och fungerade delvis som ett statligt censurverktyg. Med tiden blev den viktigaste funktionen istället att bevara det tryckta kulturarvet. Mellan 1776 och 1949 utgjorde tryckfrihetsförordningen det ramverk i vilket bestämmelserna om pliktleveranserna reglerades. Den första lagen om pliktexemplar tillkom 1949 (SFS 1949:166), vilken ersattes med en ny 1978 (SFS 1978:487).

    Kungliga biblioteket (KB) var först med att erhålla funktionen som  pliktbibliotek 1661. Även universitetsbiblioteken i Uppsala och Lund har sedan sent 1600-tal erhållit pliktleveranser. Under 1900-talet har också universitetsbiblioteken i Göteborg och Umeå erhållit denna status, och slutligen Stockholms och Linköpings universitetsbibliotek i enlighet med beslutet från 1978. Av dessa bibliotek är endast KB och Lunds UB ålagda att spara på allt material för all framtid medan de andra pliktbiblioteken erhåller ”biblioteksexemplar”, även kallade bruksexemplar eller regionexemplar, utan medföljande bevarandeansvar. Dessa exemplar hanteras dock ganska olika på de olika biblioteken.

  • Velikyan, Irina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Uppsala Univ Hosp, PET Ctr, Ctr Med Imaging, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Haack, Torsten
    Sanofi Aventis Deutschland GmbH, Ind Pk Hochst, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Bossart, Martin
    Sanofi Aventis Deutschland GmbH, Ind Pk Hochst, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Evers, Andreas
    Sanofi Aventis Deutschland GmbH, Ind Pk Hochst, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Laitinen, Iina
    Sanofi Aventis Deutschland GmbH, Ind Pk Hochst, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Larsen, Philip
    Sanofi Aventis Deutschland GmbH, Ind Pk Hochst, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Plettenburg, Oliver
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth GmbH, Inst Med Chem, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Neuherberg, Germany; Leibniz Univ Hannover, Inst Organ Chem, Hannover, Germany.
    Johansson, Lars
    Antaros Med AB, Uppsala Sci Pk, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pierrou, Stefan
    Antaros Med AB, Uppsala Sci Pk, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wagner, Michael
    Sanofi Aventis Deutschland GmbH, Ind Pk Hochst, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Antaros Med AB, Uppsala Sci Pk, Uppsala, Sweden.
    First-in-class positron emission tomography tracer for the glucagon receptor2019In: EJNMMI Research, ISSN 2191-219X, E-ISSN 2191-219X, Vol. 9, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The glucagon receptor (GCGR) is emerging as an important target in anti-diabetic therapy, especially as part of the pharmacology of dual glucagon-like peptide-1/glucagon (GLP-1/GCG) receptor agonists. However, currently, there are no suitable biomarkers that reliably demonstrate GCG receptor target engagement.

    Methods: Two potent GCG receptor peptide agonists, S01-GCG and S02-GCG, were labeled with positron emission tomography (PET) radionuclide gallium-68. The GCG receptor binding affinity and specificity of the resulting radiopharmaceuticals [68Ga]Ga-DO3A-S01-GCG and [68Ga]Ga-DO3A-S02-GCG were evaluated in HEK-293 cells overexpressing the human GCG receptor and on frozen hepatic sections from human, non-human primate, and rat. In in vivo biodistribution, binding specificity and dosimetry were assessed in rat.

    Results: [68Ga]Ga-DO3A-S01-GCG in particular demonstrated GCG receptor-mediated binding in cells and liver tissue with affinity in the nanomolar range required for imaging. [68Ga]Ga-DO3A-S01-GCG binding was not blocked by co-incubation of a GLP-1 agonist. In vivo binding in rat liver was GCG receptor specific with low non-specific binding throughout the body. Moreover, the extrapolated human effective doses, predicted from rat biodistribution data, allow for repeated PET imaging potentially also in combination with GLP-1R radiopharmaceuticals.

    Conclusion: [68Ga]Ga-DO3A-S01-GCG thus constitutes a first-in-class PET tracer targeting the GCG receptor, with suitable properties for clinical development. This tool has potential to provide direct quantitative evidence of GCG receptor occupancy in humans.

  • Pape, Kathrine
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Sect Environm Occupat & Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark;Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Lerso Pk Alle 105, DK-2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark.
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Univ Bergen, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Int Hlth, Bergen, Norway;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, Bergen, Norway.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Benediktsdottir, Bryndis
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Iceland Primary Hlth Care Ctr, Gardabaer, Iceland.
    Lodge, Caroline
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Mol Environm Genet & Analyt MEGA Epidemiol, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Moratalla, Jesus
    Albacete Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Albacete, Spain.
    Sanchez-Ramos, Jose Luis
    Univ Huelva, Dept Nursing, Huelva, Spain.
    Braback, Lennart
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Holm, Mathias
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Occupat & Environm Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Joegi, Rain
    Tartu Univ, Dept Pulm Med, Tartu, Estonia;Univ Kiel, Div Expt Asthma Res, Leibniz Ctr Med & Biosci, Res Ctr Borstel, Kiel, Germany.
    Bertelsen, Randi Jacobsen
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway.
    Sigsgaard, Torben
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Sect Environm Occupat & Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Johannessen, Ane
    Univ Bergen, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Int Hlth, Bergen, Norway;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, Bergen, Norway.
    Schlunssen, Vivi
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Sect Environm Occupat & Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark;Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Lerso Pk Alle 105, DK-2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark.
    Agreement of offspring-reported parental smoking status: the RHINESSA generation study2019In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    With increasing interest in exposure effects across generations, it is crucial to assess the validity of information given on behalf of others.

    Aims:

    To compare adult's report of their parent's smoking status against parent's own report and examine predictors for discrepant answers.

    Methods:

    We studied 7185 offspring (18-51 years) and one of their parents, n = 5307 (27-67 years) participating in the Respiratory Health in Northern Europe, Spain and Australia (RHINESSA) generation study. Information about parent's smoking status during offspring's childhood and mother's smoking status during pregnancy was obtained by questionnaires from parents and their offspring. We calculated sensitivity, specificity and Cohen's Kappa [kappa] for agreement using parent's own report as the gold standard. We performed logistic regression to examine if offspring's sex, age, educational level, asthma status, own smoking status or parental status, as well as the parent's sex and amount of smoking during childhood predicted disagreement.

    Results:

    The sensitivity for offspring's correct report of parent's smoking status during childhood (0-10 years) was 0.82 (95% CI 0.81-0.84), specificity was 0.95 (95% CI 0.95-0.96) and a good agreement was observed, kappa = 0.79 (95% CI 0.78-0.80). Offspring's report of mothers' smoking status during pregnancy showed a lower sensitivity, 0.66 (95% CI 0.60-0.71), a slightly lower specificity, 0.92 (95% CI 0.90-0.95) and a good agreement, kappa = 0.61 (95% CI 0.55-0.67). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, offspring not having children was a predictor for discrepant answers (odds ratio [OR] 2.11 [95% CI 1.21-3.69]). Low amount of parents' tobacco consumption, < 10 cigarettes/day (OR 2.72 [95% CI 1.71-4.31]) also predicted disagreement compared to >= 10 cigarettes per day, and so did offspring's reports of fathers' smoking status (OR 1.73 [95% CI 1.09-2.74]) compared to mothers' smoking status. Offspring's sex, asthma status, educational level, smoking status or age was not related to discrepant answers.

    Conclusions:

    Adults report their parent's smoking status during their childhood, as well as their mother' smoking status when pregnant with them, quite accurately. In the absence of parents' direct report, offspring's reports could be valuable.

  • Idborg, Helena
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prot Sci, SciLifeLab, Div Affin Prote, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Ann-Sofi
    Sci Life Lab, Dept Oncol Pathol, Clin Prote Mass Spectrometry, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Elvin, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, Unit Clin Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Truedsson, Lennart
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Sect Microbiol Immunol & Glycobiol, Lund, Sweden.
    Sohrabian, Azita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Rönnelid, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Mo, John
    AstraZeneca R&D, Patient Safety Resp Inflammat Autoimmun Infect &, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Grosso, Giorgia
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kvarnstrom, Marika
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lehtio, Janne
    Sci Life Lab, Dept Oncol Pathol, Clin Prote Mass Spectrometry, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prot Sci, SciLifeLab, Div Affin Prote, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Per-Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Two subgroups in systemic lupus erythematosus with features of antiphospholipid or Sjogren's syndrome differ in molecular signatures and treatment perspectives2019In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 21, article id 62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies and own clinical observations of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) suggest that SLE harbors distinct immunophenotypes. This heterogeneity might result in differences in response to treatment in different subgroups and obstruct clinical trials. Our aim was to understand how SLE subgroups may differ regarding underlying pathophysiology and characteristic biomarkers.

    Methods: In a cross-sectional study, including 378 well-characterized SLE patients and 316 individually matched population controls, we defined subgroups based on the patients’ autoantibody profile at inclusion. We selected a core of an antiphospholipid syndrome-like SLE (aPL+ group; positive in the lupus anticoagulant (LA) test and negative for all three of SSA (Ro52 and Ro60) and SSB antibodies) and a Sjögren’s syndrome-like SLE (SSA/SSB+ group; positive for all three of SSA (Ro52 and Ro60) and SSB antibodies but negative in the LA test). We applied affinity-based proteomics, targeting 281 proteins, together with well-established clinical biomarkers and complementary immunoassays to explore the difference between the two predefined SLE subgroups.

    Results: The aPL+ group comprised 66 and the SSA/SSB+ group 63 patients. The protein with the highest prediction power (receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve = 0.89) for separating the aPL+ and SSA/SSB+ SLE subgroups was integrin beta-1 (ITGB1), with higher levels present in the SSA/SSB+ subgroup. Proteins with the lowest p values comparing the two SLE subgroups were ITGB1, SLC13A3, and CERS5. These three proteins, rheumatoid factor, and immunoglobulin G (IgG) were all increased in the SSA/SSB+ subgroup. This subgroup was also characterized by a possible activation of the interferon system as measured by high KRT7, TYK2, and ETV7 in plasma. In the aPL+ subgroup, complement activation was more pronounced together with several biomarkers associated with systemic inflammation (fibrinogen, α-1 antitrypsin, neutrophils, and triglycerides).

    Conclusions: Our observations indicate underlying pathogenic differences between the SSA/SSB+ and the aPL+ SLE subgroups, suggesting that the SSA/SSB+ subgroup may benefit from IFN-blocking therapies while the aPL+ subgroup is more likely to have an effect from drugs targeting the complement system. Stratifying SLE patients based on an autoantibody profile could be a way forward to understand underlying pathophysiology and to improve selection of patients for clinical trials of targeted treatments.

  • Liu, Jing
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Scientific Computing. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computational Science.
    van der Schot, Gijs
    Univ Utrecht, Bijvoet Ctr Biomol Res, Cryoelect Microscopy, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Engblom, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Scientific Computing.
    Supervised classification methods for flash X-ray single particle diffraction imaging2019In: Optics Express, ISSN 1094-4087, E-ISSN 1094-4087, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 3884-3899Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current Flash X-ray single-particle diffraction Imaging (FXI) experiments, which operate on modern X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs), can record millions of interpretable diffraction patterns from individual biomolecules per day. Due to the practical limitations with the FXI technology, those patterns will to a varying degree include scatterings from contaminated samples. Also, the heterogeneity of the sample biomolecules is unavoidable and complicates data processing. Reducing the data volumes and selecting high-quality single-molecule patterns are therefore critical steps in the experimental setup. In this paper, we present two supervised template-based learning methods for classifying FXI patterns. Our Eigen-Image and Log-Likelihood classifier can find the best-matched template for a single-molecule pattern within a few milliseconds. It is also straightforward to parallelize them so as to match the XFEL repetition rate fully, thereby enabling processing at site. The methods perform in a stable way on various kinds of synthetic data. As a practical example we tested our methods on a real mimivirus dataset, obtaining a convincing classification accuracy of 0.9.

  • Adams, Emma A.
    et al.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, NTNU, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway;Ontario Shores Ctr Mental Hlth Sci, Strateg Initiat, Whitby, ON, Canada.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, NTNU, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway;St Olavs Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Trondheim, Norway.
    Wijewardene, Kumudu
    Univ Sri Jayewardenepura, Fac Med Sci, Dept Community Med Hlth, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka.
    Infanti, Jennifer J.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, NTNU, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Perceptions on the sexual harassment of female nurses in a state hospital in Sri Lanka: a qualitative study2019In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1560587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Sexual harassment occurs within the nursing profession globally, challenging the health and safety of nurses and the quality and efficiency of health systems. In Sri Lanka, no studies have explored this issue in the health sector; however, female employees face sexual harassment in other workplace settings.

    Objective:

    To explore female nurses' perceptions of workplace sexual harassment in a large state hospital in Sri Lanka.

    Methods:

    This is a qualitative study conducted in an urban, mainly Buddhist and Singhalese context. We invited all female senior and ward nurses working in the hospital to participate in the study. We conducted individual in-depth interviews with four senior nurses and focus group discussions with 29 nurses in three groups.

    Results:

    The nurses described a variety of perceived forms of sexual harassment in the hospital. They discussed patient-perpetrated incidents as the most threatening and the clearest to identify compared with incidents involving doctors and other co-workers. There was significant ambiguity regarding sexual consent and coercion in relationships between female nurses and male doctors, which were described as holding potential for exploitation or harassment. The nurses reported that typical reactions to sexual harassment were passive. Alternatively, they described encountering inaction or victim blaming when they attempted to formally report incidents. They perceived that workplace sexual harassment has contributed to negative societal attitudes about the nursing profession and discussed various informal strategies, such as working in teams, to protect themselves from sexual harassment in the hospital.

    Conclusions:

    Sexual harassment was a perceived workplace concern for nurses in this hospital. To develop effective local prevention and intervention responses, further research is required to determine the magnitude of the problem and explore differences in responses to and consequences of sexual harassment based on perpetrator type and intent, and personal vulnerabilities of the victims, among other factors.

  • Mantas, Athanasios
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Immediate-Release Nifedipine Binary Dry Powder Mixtures with Nanocellulose Featuring Enhanced Solubility and Dissolution Rate2019In: Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1999-4923, E-ISSN 1999-4923, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nifedipine (NIF) is a 1,4-dihydropyridine-based calcium channel blocker with poor solubility, whose bioavailability is highly dependent on the type of formulation. Dry powder mixtures of 20% w/w NIF with microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and its high surface area nanocellulose analogue, which is namely Cladophora (CLAD) cellulose, were produced by heating at the melting temperature of the drug for 1 h. Non-heated samples were used as a reference. The solid-state properties of the mixtures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The drug release was studied in biorelevant media, including simulated gastric fluid (SGF), fasted-state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSIF) and fed-state simulated intestinal fluid (FeSIF). An enhanced apparent solubility and faster dissolution rate of NIF were observed in the heated mixture of NIF with CLAD-H in all tested biorelevant media (i.e., SGF, FaSIF and FeSIF), which was due to NIF amorphization in the high surface area nanocellulose powder. Ordinary MCC, which is essentially non-porous, did not produce an enhancement of a similar magnitude. The results of the study suggest that dry powder formulation using high surface area nanocellulose is a facile new strategy for formulating calcium channel blocker drugs, which could potentially be a viable alternative to currently used soft gel liquid capsules.

  • Ablikim, M.
    et al.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Andersson, Walter Ikegami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Johansson, Tord
    Kupsc, Andrzej
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Li, Cui
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Papenbrock, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Pettersson, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Schönning, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Wolke, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Zou, J. H.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Measurement of the absolute branching fractions of Lambda(+)(c) -> Lambda eta pi(+) and Sigma(1385) (+) eta2019In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 99, no 3, article id 032010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the decays Lambda(+)(c) -> Lambda eta pi(+) and Sigma(1385)(+)eta based on Lambda(+)(c)(Lambda) over bar (c) pairs produced in e(+)e(-) collisions at a center-of-mass energy of root s = 4.6 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 567 pb(-1). The data sample was accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider. The branching fractions are measured to be beta(Lambda(+)(c) -> Lambda eta pi(+)) = (1.84 +/- 0.21 (stat) +/- 0.15(syst))% and B(Lambda(+)(c) -> Sigma(1385)(+) eta) = (0.91 +/- 0.18 (stat) +/- 0.09 (syst))%, constituting the most precise measurements to date.

  • Gustafsson, Simon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Westermann, Frank
    Charles River Biopharmaceut Serv, Gottfried Hagen Str 20, D-51105 Cologne, Germany.
    Hanrieder, Tobias
    Charles River Biopharmaceut Serv, Gottfried Hagen Str 20, D-51105 Cologne, Germany.
    Jung, Laura
    Charles River Biopharmaceut Serv, Gottfried Hagen Str 20, D-51105 Cologne, Germany.
    Ruppach, Horst
    Charles River Biopharmaceut Serv, Gottfried Hagen Str 20, D-51105 Cologne, Germany.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Comparative Analysis of Dry and Wet Porometry Methods for Characterization of Regular and Cross-Linked Virus Removal Filter Papers2019In: Membranes, ISSN 2077-0375, E-ISSN 2077-0375, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pore-size distribution (PSD) is the most critical parameter for size-exclusion virus removal filters. Yet, different dry- and wet-state porometry methods yield different pore-size values. The goal of this work is to conduct comparative analysis of nitrogen gas sorption (NGSP), liquid-liquid and cryoporometry with differential scanning calorimetry (CP-DSC) methods with respect to characterization of regular and cross-linked virus removal filter paper based on cellulose nanofibers, i.e. the mille-feuille filter. The filters were further characterized with atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. Finally, the removal of the worst-case model virus, i.e. minute virus of mice (MVM; 20 nm, nonenveloped parvovirus) was evaluated. The results revealed that there is no difference of the obtained PSDs between the wet methods, i.e. DSC and liquid-liquid porometry (LLP), as well as no difference between the regular and cross-linked filters regardless of method. MVM filtration at different trans membrane pressure (TMP) revealed strong dependence of the virus removal capability on applied pressure. It was further observed that cross-linking filters showed enhanced virus removal, especially at lower TMP. In all, the results of this study highlight the complex nature of virus capture in size-exclusion filters.

  • Yang, Jian-Quan
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing, Peoples R China; Chinese Acad Sci, Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Ye, Zou
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, FREIA.
    Tang, Jing-Yu
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing, Peoples R China; Chinese Acad Sci, Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China; Dongguan Neutron Sci Ctr, Dongguan, Peoples R China.
    Collimation method studies for next-generation hadron colliders2019In: PHYSICAL REVIEW ACCELERATORS AND BEAMS, ISSN 2469-9888, Vol. 22, no 2, article id 023002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to handle the extremely high stored energy in future proton-proton colliders, an extremely high-efficiency collimation system is required for safe operation. At the LHC, the major limiting locations in terms of particle losses on superconducting (SC) magnets are the dispersion suppressors downstream of the transverse collimation insertion. These losses are due to the protons experiencing single diffractive interactions in the primary collimators. How to solve this problem is very important for future proton-proton colliders, such as the Future Circular Hadron-Hadron Collider and the Super Proton-Proton Collider. In this article, a novel method is proposed, which arranges both the transverse and momentum collimation in the same long straight section. In this way, additional absorbers between the two cleaning hierarchies can clean those particles related to the single diffractive effect, with the downstream momentum collimation system intercepting any further leakage. The effectiveness of the method has been confirmed by multiparticle simulations. In addition, SC quadrupoles with special designs such as an enlarged aperture and good shielding are adopted to enhance the phase advance in the transverse collimation section so that tertiary collimators can be arranged to clean off the tertiary halo which emerges from the secondary collimators and improve the collimation efficiency. With one more collimation stage in the transverse collimation, the beam losses in both the momentum collimation section and the experimental regions can be largely reduced. Multiparticle simulation results with the MERLIN code confirm the effectiveness of the collimation method. At last, we provide a protection scheme of the SC magnets in the collimation section. The FLUKA simulations show that, by adding some special protective collimators in front of the magnets, the maximum power deposition in the SC coils is reduced dramatically, which is proven to be valid for protecting the SC magnets from quenching.

  • Terrinoni, Manuela
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg Vaccine Res Inst GUVAX, Dept Microbiol & Immunol,Inst Biomed, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Jan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg Vaccine Res Inst GUVAX, Dept Microbiol & Immunol,Inst Biomed, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lebens, Michael
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg Vaccine Res Inst GUVAX, Dept Microbiol & Immunol,Inst Biomed, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Larena, Maximilian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Human Evolution. Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg Vaccine Res Inst GUVAX, Dept Microbiol & Immunol,Inst Biomed, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Requirement for Cyclic AMP/Protein Kinase A-Dependent Canonical NFκB Signaling in the Adjuvant Action of Cholera Toxin and Its Non-toxic Derivative mmCT2019In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 10, article id 269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cholera toxin (CT) is widely used as an effective adjuvant in experimental immunology for inducing mucosal immune responses; yet its mechanisms of adjuvant action remain incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that mice lacking NFκB, compared to wild-type (WT) mice, had a 90% reduction in their systemic and mucosal immune responses to oral immunization with a model protein antigen [Ovalbumin (OVA)] given together with CT. Further, NFκB−/− mouse dendritic cells (DCs) stimulated in vitro with CT showed reduced expression of MHCII and co-stimulatory molecules, such as CD80 and CD86, as well as of IL-1β, and other pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to WT DCs. Using a human monocyte cell line THP1 with an NFκB activation reporter system, we show that CT induced NFκB signaling in human monocytes, and that inhibition of the cyclic AMP—protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathway abrogated the activation and nuclear translocation of NFκB. In a human monocyte-CD4+ T cell co-culture system we further show that the strong Th17 response induced by CT treatment of monocytes was abolished by blocking the classical but not the alternative NFκB signaling pathway of monocytes. Our results indicate that activation of classical (canonical) NFκB pathway signaling in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by CT is important for CT's adjuvant enhancement of Th17 responses. Similar findings were obtained using the almost completely detoxified mmCT mutant protein as adjuvant. Altogether, our results demonstrate that activation of the classical NFκB signal transduction pathway in APCs is important for the adjuvant action of both CT and mmCT.

  • Lindh, Markus V.
    et al.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Sensitivity of Bacterioplankton to Environmental Disturbance: A Review of Baltic Sea Field Studies and Experiments2018In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 5, article id UNSP 361Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterioplankton communities regulate energy and matter fluxes fundamental to all aquatic life. The Baltic Sea offers an outstanding ecosystem for interpreting causes and consequences of bacterioplankton community composition shifts resulting from environmental disturbance. Yet, a systematic synthesis of the composition of Baltic Sea bacterioplankton and their responses to natural or human-induced environmental perturbations is lacking. We review current research on Baltic Sea bacterioplankton dynamics in situ (48 articles) and in laboratory experiments (38 articles) carried out at a variety of spatiotemporal scales. In situ studies indicate that the salinity gradient sets the boundaries for bacterioplankton composition, whereas, regional environmental conditions at a within-basin scale, including the level of hypoxia and phytoplankton succession stages, may significantly tune the composition of bacterial communities. Also the experiments show that Baltic Sea bacteria are highly responsive to environmental conditions, with general influences of e.g. salinity, temperature and nutrients. Importantly, nine out of ten experiments that measured both bacterial community composition and some metabolic activities showed empirical support for the sensitivity scenario of bacteria - i.e., that environmental disturbance caused concomitant change in both community composition and community functioning. The lack of studies empirically testing the resilience scenario, i.e., experimental studies that incorporate the long-term temporal dimension, precludes conclusions about the potential prevalence of resilience of Baltic Sea bacterioplankton. We also outline outstanding questions emphasizing promising applications in incorporating bacterioplankton community dynamics into biogeochemical and food-web models and the lack of knowledge for deep-sea assemblages, particularly bacterioplankton structure-function relationships. This review emphasizes that bacterioplankton communities rapidly respond to natural and predicted human-induced environmental disturbance by altering their composition and metabolic activity. Unless bacterioplankton are resilient, such changes could have severe consequences for the regulation of microbial ecosystem services.

  • Haque, M. Atiqul
    et al.
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Publ Hlth Sci, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Janson, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Moniruzzaman, Syed
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Environm & Life Sci, Risk & Environm Studies, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Rahman, A. K. M. Fazlur
    New DOHS, Ctr Injury Prevent & Res, Dhaka, Bangladesh; Bangladesh Univ Hlth Sci, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Islam, Syed Shariful
    Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Med Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Informat, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Mashreky, Saidur Rahman
    New DOHS, Ctr Injury Prevent & Res, Dhaka, Bangladesh; Bangladesh Univ Hlth Sci, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Eriksson, Ulla-Britt
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Publ Hlth Sci, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Children's exposure to physical abuse from a child perspective: A population-based study in rural Bangladesh2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 2, article id e0212428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although child physical abuse (CPA) is considered as a major global public health problem, it has not yet been recognized as such in Bangladesh. Very few studies have assessed the prevalence and victims’ characteristics of multiple forms of CPA.

    Objective: This population-based study assessed the prevalence of CPA committed by adults in a rural area of Bangladesh and examined its association with demographic and socio-contextual factors.

    Methods: Data were obtained using ISPCAN Child Abuse Screening Tool for Children (ICAST-C) in a random sample of 1416 children (49% girls, 51% boys) aged 11 to 17 years by face-to-face interviews during March-April 2017. The response rate was 91.5%. To estimate predictors of CPA, physical abuse was categorized into frequent and less frequent groups.

    Results: The prevalence of at least one form (≥ 1), two forms (≥2) and three or more forms (≥ 3) of CPA were estimated approximately to 99%, 95% and 83% in their lifetime and 93%, 79%, and 57% in the past year respectively. Hitting (except on buttocks), standing/kneeling and slapping were the most common physical abuse whereas given drugs or alcohol, pinched, burned or scalded, beaten-up and locked up were less reported. Female children were faced severe forms of CPA more than that of males. Male children, younger age groups, witnessing adults using weapons at home, bullied by siblings and low level of maternal education were found to be significant risk factors for both ≥ 1 form and ≥ 2 forms of frequent CPA whereas adding also adult shouting in a frightening way was found as a significant risk factor for ≥ 2 forms of frequent CPA.

    Conclusion: Self-reported prevalence of CPA is extremely common in the Bangladeshi rural society. The prevalence was associated with demographic and socio-contextual characteristics of the children such as being younger, witnessing domestic violence and maternal low education. The findings provide evidence to support parents and policy-makers to take effective measures to implement policy and programme on alternative up-bringing methods and creating awareness of negative effects of CM which in turn help Bangladesh to line up with UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, which the country signed in 1990.

  • Thomsen, Frederik Birkebaek
    et al.
    Univ Copenhagen, Rigshosp, Dept Urol, Copenhagen Prostate Canc Ctr, Ole Maaloes Vej 24,Afs 7521, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bosco, Cecilia
    Kings Coll London, TOUR, Sch Canc & Pharmaceut Sci, London, England.
    Garmo, Hans
    Kings Coll London, TOUR, Sch Canc & Pharmaceut Sci, London, England;Uppsala Univ Hosp, Reg Canc Ctr Uppsala Orebro, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, CLINTEC Dept, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hammar, Niklas
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden;AstraZeneca, Global Med Dev, Med Evidence & Observat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Kings Coll London, TOUR, Sch Canc & Pharmaceut Sci, London, England;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anti-androgen monotherapy versus gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists in men with advanced, non-metastatic prostate cancer: a register-based, observational study2019In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 110-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    In randomised controlled trials, men with advanced, non-metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) treated with anti-androgen monotherapy (AA) had similar all-cause mortality as men treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists. Using real-world evidence (i.e., observational data), we aimed to further assess the difference in mortality between these two drug categories.

    Material and Methods:

    We emulated a trial using data from Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden 3.0. We specifically focused on men diagnosed in 2006-2012 with high-risk PCa who had no distant metastasis. They either received primary hormonal therapy with AA (n=2078) or GnRH agonists (n=4878) who were followed for a median time of 5 years. Risk of death from PCa and other causes was assessed using competing risk analyses and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses, including propensity score matching.

    Results:

    The cumulative 5-year PCa mortality was lower for men treated with AA (16% [95% confidence interval, CI, 15-18%]) than men treated with GnRH agonists (22% [95% CI 21-24%]). The 5-year other cause mortality was also lower for men on AA (17% [95% CI 15-19%] compared to men on GnRH agonists (27% [95% CI 25-28%]). In regression analyses, the risk of PCa death was similar, GnRH agonists versus AA (reference), hazard ratio (HR) 1.08 (95% CI 0.95-1.23), but the risk of death from all causes was higher for men on GnRH agonists, HR 1.23 (95% CI 1.13-1.34). Consistent results were seen in the propensity score-matched cohort.

    Conclusion:

    Our results indicate that the use of AA as primary hormonal therapy in men with high-risk non-metastatic PCa does not increase PCa-specific mortality compared to GnRH. Using AA instead of GnRH agonists may result in shorter time on/exposure to GnRH-treatment, which may reduce the risk of adverse events associated with this treatment.

  • Claremar, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Evaluation of ISKA forecast performance: An investigation on binary and probabilistic forecast skill scores2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The company Ignitia provides rainfall forecasts through SMS to subscribers in Ghana, Mali and some other countries in the West African region south of Sahara. Their ensemble-based probabilistic forecast product iska, based on the high-resolution weather model WRF with modifications, has been developed to better simulate tropical conditions where rainfall is driven by convection. 

    This external investigation determined the forecast skill of iska by validating against NOAA satellite rainfall product. As comparison, rainfall probability forecasts from the global model GFS and from Weather Underground were evaluated. The iska forecasts outperformed the GFS forecasts and the Weather Underground forecasts in terms of accuracy. The statistical skill decreased towards the Sahel region and also towards the coast, the latter probably an artefact of the NOAA product having problems in identifying local warm-cloud rain, meaning that the forecast skill by the coast might be better than indicated.

  • Norris, Karl
    et al.
    Univ Lancaster, Lancaster, England.
    Mishukova, Oksana I.
    Natl Res Tomsk Polytech Univ, Tomsk, Russia.
    Zykwinska, Agata
    IFREMER, Nantes, France.
    Colliec-Jouault, Sylvia
    IFREMER, Nantes, France.
    Sinquin, Corinne
    IFREMER, Nantes, France.
    Koptioug, Andrei
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Cuenot, Stephane
    Univ Nantes, Nantes, France.
    Kerns, Jemma G.
    Univ Lancaster, Lancaster, England.
    Surmeneva, Maria A.
    Natl Res Tomsk Polytech Univ, Tomsk, Russia.
    Surmenev, Roman A.
    Natl Res Tomsk Polytech Univ, Tomsk, Russia.
    Douglas, Timothy E. L.
    Univ Lancaster, Lancaster, England; Univ Lancaster, Lancaster, England.
    Marine Polysaccharide-Collagen Coatings on Ti6Al4V Alloy Formed by Self-Assembly2019In: Micromachines, ISSN 2072-666X, E-ISSN 2072-666X, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polysaccharides of marine origin are gaining interest as biomaterial components. Bacteria derived from deep-sea hydrothermal vents can produce sulfated exopolysaccharides (EPS), which can influence cell behavior. The use of such polysaccharides as components of organic, collagen fibril-based coatings on biomaterial surfaces remains unexplored. In this study, collagen fibril coatings enriched with HE800 and GY785 EPS derivatives were deposited on titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) scaffolds produced by rapid prototyping and subjected to physicochemical and cell biological characterization. Coatings were formed by a self-assembly process whereby polysaccharides were added to acidic collagen molecule solution, followed by neutralization to induced self-assembly of collagen fibrils. Fibril formation resulted in collagen hydrogel formation. Hydrogels formed directly on Ti6Al4V surfaces, and fibrils adsorbed onto the surface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of collagen fibril coatings revealed association of polysaccharides with fibrils. Cell biological characterization revealed good cell adhesion and growth on bare Ti6Al4V surfaces, as well as coatings of collagen fibrils only and collagen fibrils enhanced with HE800 and GY785 EPS derivatives. Hence, the use of both EPS derivatives as coating components is feasible. Further work should focus on cell differentiation.

  • Josefsson, Weine
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Long-term global radiation in Stockholm, 1922-20182019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1922 monitoring of global irradiation started in Stockholm, Sweden. Over the years SMHI has been measuring this meteorological quantity with various instruments and at different sites within Stockholm. This type of changes of instruments and sites cause minor, but important systematic changes in the measured global irradiation. Therefore, it is not recommended to directly compare the results from different periods.The report presents methods how this can be done and there is a final data set with long-term global radiation data for Stockholm. Daily and monthly final data are presented on a web-page at www.smhi.seAs a bi-product the sunshine duration was also digitized, controlled and corrected. These data can be found in Appendix 3.

  • Brage, Christina
    Linköping University, University Library.
    Från bibliotekskunskap till informationskompetens: Nedslag i användarundervisningens idéhistoria2018In: Ett bibliotek i takt med tiden: Linköpings universitetsbibliotek 50 år / [ed] Peter Igelström och Christina Brage, Linköping: Linköpings universitetsbibliotek , 2018, p. 80-101Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vid universitet och högskolor förväntas studenterna utveckla förmågor och förhållningssätt som är anpassade till vad som kommer att krävas av dem i ett framtida yrkesliv. De studerande ska tillägna sig förmågan att lära av nya erfarenheter och möta olika situationer i livet utanför universitetet. Att förbereda för det okända och oväntade gäller som mål även för bibliotekets undervisning. Ett centralt inslag i denna förmåga är det vi idag kallar för ”informationskompetens”.

    Begreppet har genom åren diskuterats flitigt och fått olika definitioner. Men oavsett dess innebörd är det något som vi bibliotekarier måste ta ställning till i vårt yrkesverksamma liv. I likhet med de flesta andra begrepp har informationskompetens inte fötts utan en förhistoria. Det är delar av denna historia som jag vill diskutera i detta avsnitt. Nedan följer några nedslag i användarundervisningens historia och den litteratur som fungerat som inspirationskälla vid Linköpings universitetsbibliotek (LiUB). Framför oss har vi en resa via begrepp som bok- och bibliotekskunskap, biblioteksorientering, informationssökning, informationshantering, låntagarundervisning och användarundervisning.

  • Söderholm, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, University Library.
    Igelström, Peter
    Linköping University, University Library.
    Campus Norrköpings bibliotek: de första 20 åren2018In: Ett bibliotek i takt med tiden: Linköpings universitetsbibliotek 50 år / [ed] Peter Igelström och Christina Brage, Linköping: Linköpings universitetsbibliotek , 2018, p. 73-77Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under 2017 firade Campus Norrköping 20 år, ett jubileum som lördagen den 18 mars uppmärksammades med populärvetenskapliga föreläsningar, guidade turer, öppet hus och filmvisningar. På Campus Norrköpings bibliotek (CNB) visades Sanna drömmar i kvarteret Oron, Toumo Haapalas film om invigningen av Campus Norrköping i september 1998.

    Och nog fanns det anledning att fira! Satsningen på ett samlat campus för Linköpings universitet (LiU) i Norrköping inleddes med regeringens sysselsättningsproposition i juni 1996. Tre civilingenjörsutbildningar och tre filosofiska magisterprogram etablerades nu i Norrköping. Liksom ett nytt campusgemensamt bibliotek. Under åren har LiU:s expansion i Norrköping lett till att antalet studenter vuxit från 1400 vårterminen 1997 till cirka 5000 idag och antalet anställda från 150 till 500, vilket motsvarar en femtedel av verksamheten vid hela Linköpings universitet.

    Vad har då kännetecknat Campus Norrköpings bibliotek under de första 20 åren av dess existens?

  • Brage, Christina
    Linköping University, University Library.
    Mitt liv som Tema-bibliotekarie2018In: Ett bibliotek i takt med tiden: Linköpings universitetsbibliotek 50 år / [ed] Peter Igelström och Christina Brage, Linköping: Linköpings universitetsbibliotek , 2018, p. 65-72Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I augusti 1984 flyttade jag ned till Temainstitutionen förlagd till den gamla linnefabriken på Platensgatan 26 där tidigare humanistiska biblioteket hade huserat. Innan dess var jag föreståndare för det ekonomiska biblioteket (KA), numera i salig åminnelse, och före det ansvarig för fjärrlån. Vid den tiden var Tema Teknik och social förändring (Tema T) samt Tema Vatten i natur och samhälle (Tema V), Tema Kommunikation (Tema K) och Tema Hälsa (Tema H) redan etablerade, vilka kom att följas av Tema Barn (Tema B). År 1987 gick flytten upp till Campus Valla och där kom ytterligare två teman att etableras: Tema Genus och Tema Mat (Tema M). På senare år har ytterligare två teman tillkommit: Tema Etnicitet med placering i Norrköping samt Tema Kulturarv och kulturproduktion med delad placering i Linköping och Norrköping. Av olika anledningar har Tema H och Tema M upphört.

    Under åren som passerat har jag varit bibliotekarie för nästan samtliga teman i olika omgångar. Som Tema-bibliotekarie har jag haft möjligheten att på nära håll följa forskningens eller rättare sagt forskares vedermödor och glädjeämnen. Tvärvetenskap är och har alltid varit ett centralt begrepp och kännetecken för institutionen ända sedan dess start i början på 80-talet. De ämnesområden som fanns företrädda inom de teman jag jobbat med var allt ifrån ren naturvetenskap till humaniora. Detta innebar naturligtvis att någon ämnesexpert kunde jag inte vara. Mitt sista uppdrag var att fungera som bibliotekarie för Tema Vatten i natur och samhälle, som numer bytt namn till Tema Miljöförändring.

  • Magnusson, Maria
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Pramling Samuelsson, Ingrid
    University of Gothenburg.
    Att tillägna sig skriftspråkliga verktyg genom att leka affär2019In: Forskning om undervisning och lärande, ISSN 2000-9674, E-ISSN 2001-6131, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 23-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on thematic work related to playing “shop”. Teachers, as well as children, have different roles, both in the continuation and in the development of the shop over time. The study is part of a larger project on play-based teaching in early childhood education. Empirical data for the current study consist of video observations of recurrent play in a preschool. The purpose of the study is to study how literate tools come into play between children and between teachers and children in the topic of “shop”. The results show: (i) what early literate tools (concepts, distinctions) are introduced and actualized in the play and (ii) how these are appropriated and given importance to the continuation of the play. The aspect of writing that becomes particularly important is the communicative functions of symbols. The literate content becomes significant for the development of play as well as how the teacher in play responds to children’s actions. Through empirical analysis, the study gives an example of teaching on the basis of play in preschool.

  • Løtvedt, Siri M.
    et al.
    Oļševskis, Edvīns
    Westergaard, Jørgen M.
    Veterinary Contingency Planning: The Proceedings of a Nordic-Baltic Seminar on contingency planning with focus on vaccination, animal welfare, wildlife and costs,  3-4 October 2018, Riga, Latvia2019Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Veterinary contingency planning in the Nordic-Baltic countries aims to prepare national veterinary administrations and stakeholders to respond speedily and effectively to an emergency situation caused by highly contagious trans-boundary viral diseases such as avian influenza, foot and mouth disease, and African swine fever. Diseases having a disastrous impact on the livelihood of people working in the livestock sector and related industries.The Nordic and Baltic countries have by and large adopted very similar guidelines for the development of animal health contingency plans; guidelines based on the four pillars: disease prevention, preparatory arrangements, response and recovery.This report contains information on the conduct of a Nordic-Baltic seminar and the recommendations adopted by the seminar participants; the seminar had focus on vaccination, animal welfare, wildlife and costs.

  • Welander, Eva Sofia
    Linköping University, University Library.
    Biblioteket integrerat i utbildningen: mina år på MB och HUB2018In: Ett bibliotek i takt med tiden: Linköpings universitetsbibliotek 50 år / [ed] Peter Igelström och Christina Brage, Linköping: Linköpings universitetsbibliotek , 2018, p. 58-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Som nyutbildad bibliotekarie började jag i januari 1984 på Linköpings universitets medicinska bibliotek vid Regionsjukhuset i Linköping. Jag anställdes i princip bara för att sätta upp böcker under två månader och var tvungen att avbryta en projektanställning på Länsstyrelsen för arbetslösa bibliotekarier, eftersom det här var ett vikariat för en ”riktig” tjänst. Det var jag bara glad för, för bland uppgifterna på Länsstyrelsen ingick att katalogisera tunna rapporter från inventeringar runt om i länet av kalkkärlsväxter och annan flora, och katalogisering var inte riktigt min grej.

    Jag hade valt inriktningen för folk- och skolbibliotekarie vid Bibliotekshögskolan, inte vetenskaplig bibliotekarie, men tänkte att jag till nöds nog kunde sätta upp lite böcker på Medicinska biblioteket under två månader. Men jag blev kvar och 2003 blev jag avdelningschef efter Kerstin Fridén.