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  • Sjögersten, Sofie
    Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för geovetenskaper.
    Soil Organic Matter Dynamics and Methane Fluxes at the Forest – Tundra Ecotone in Fennoscandia2003Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents results from several studies that have focused on the carbon and nutrient dynamics in soils at the forest – tundra ecotone in Fennoscandia. The main objectives of the study were: (i) to investigate the links between the physical environment, above-ground vegetation communities, soil carbon storage, nutrient status and the chemical composition of the soil organic matter (SOM), and (ii) to quantify trace gas fluxes (methane and carbon dioxide) between mesic soils and the atmosphere. Four main field areas spanning an 8 degree latitudinal gradient were established at the ecotone in 1998 and studied for four years. In addition to the natural gradients we also established a warming treatment. Decomposition rates (i.e. carbon dioxide efflux and litter decomposition) were higher at our forest sites. This was linked principally to the more favourable physical environment at the forest sites, rather than to SOM quality, despite some indications of higher SOM quality at forest sites based upon conventional chemical analysis and 13C NMR techniques. Tundra soils stored large amounts of potentially labile carbon that could readily be accessed by microorganisms when transferred to a forest environment. The interrelation between increased soil temperature and reduced soil moisture content is likely to moderate the response of decomposition rates to increased temperatures. Generally, these mesic soils showed net methane uptake from the atmosphere, which was enhanced by the warming treatment. No differences between forest or tundra soils could be detected.

    The major conclusions presented here are that (1) soil carbon storage is likely to be reduced if mountain birch forest replaces tundra heath and (2), methane uptake in mesic soils in the Fennoscandian mountains represents a negative feedback to further environmental change in a warmer climate.

  • Niva, Mikael
    Uppsala universitet, Ekologisk botanik.
    Life History Strategies in Linnaea borealis2003Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    About 70% of the plant species in the temperate zone are characterised by clonal growth, clonal species are also in majority in the Arctic and Subarctic where they affect the structure and composition of the vegetation. It is therefore of great importance to increase our knowledge about clonal plants and their growth and life histories. I have investigated how ramets of the stoloniferous plant Linnaea borealis are affected by the naturally occurring variation in environmental factors, such as: light, nutrient and water availability. Moreover, I examined the seed set and how supplemental hand pollination affects seed set in L. borealis, and also investigated the significance of the apical meristem for shoot population fitness. All studies were performed under field conditions in northern Sweden in a Subarctic environment and most are experimental.

    The results show that nutrient resorption from senescing leaves is not significantly affecting the growth and nutrient pools of the ramet. This implies that the growth of L. borealis ramets is not governed by micro-site resource availability. However, removal of light competition resulted in increased branching and number of lateral meristems produced, reduced growth, and decreased root:shoot ratio on a per ramet basis. Thus, ramets of L. borealis can efficiently exploit favourable light patches through plastic growth. Apical dominance exerts a significant effect on shoot population fitness and can be lost through rodent grazing. However, loss of apical dominance is dependent on the timing of grazing, if the apical meristem is removed early in the autumn the ramet can repair the loss until the next summer. If grazing occur during spring the dry weight and leaf area production is affected negatively. Seed production in L. borealis in the Abisko area varies between years and sites, and was unaffected by supplemental hand pollination treatment, implying that there is no lack of pollinator activity.

  • Brändström, Urban
    Umeå universitet, Rymdvetenskap.
    The Auroral Large Imaging System: design, operation and scientific results2003Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The Auroral Large Imaging System (ALIS) was proposed in 1989 by Åke Steen as a joint Scandinavian ground-based nework of automated auroral imaging stations. The primary scientic objective was in the field of auroral physics, but it was soon realised that ALIS could be used in other fields, for example, studies of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC), meteors, as well as other atmospheric phenomena.

    This report describes the design, operation and scientic results from a Swedish prototype of ALIS consisting of six unmanned remote-controlled stations located in a grid of about 50 km in northern Sweden. Each station is equipped with a sensitive high-resolution (1024 x 1024 pixels) unintensified monochromatic CCDimager. A six-position filter-wheel for narrow-band interference filters facilitates absolute spectroscopic measurements of, for example, auroral and airglow emissions. Overlapping fields-of-view resulting from the station baseline of about 50 km combined with the station field-of-view of 50° to 60°, enable triangulation as well as tomographic methods to be employed for obtaining altitude information of the observed phenomena.

    ALIS was probably one of the first instruments to take advantage of unintensi- fied (i.e. no image-intensifier) scientific-grade CCDs as detectors for spectroscopic imaging studies with multiple stations of faint phenomena such as aurora, airglow, etc. This makes absolute calibration a task that is as important as it is dificult.

    Although ALIS was primarily designed for auroral studies, the majority of the scientific results so far have, quite unexpectedly, been obtained from observations of HF pump-enhanced airglow (recently renamed Radio-Induced Aurora). ALIS made the first unambiguous observation of this phenomena at high-latitudes and the first tomography-like inversion of height profiles of the airglow regions. The scientific results so far include tomographic estimates of the auroral electron spectra, coordinated observations with satellite and radar, as well as studies of polar stratospheric clouds. An ALIS imager also participated in a joint project that produced the first ground-based daytime auroral images. Recently ALIS made spectroscopic observations of a Leonid meteor-trail and preliminary analysis indicates the possible detection of water in the Leonid.

  • Lindén, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Molekylär systembiologi.
    Curic, Vladimir
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Molekylär systembiologi.
    Amselem, Elias
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Molekylär systembiologi.
    Elf, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Molekylär systembiologi.
    Pointwise error estimates in localization microscopy2017Ingår i: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, 15115Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Pointwise localization of individual fluorophores is a critical step in super-resolution localization microscopy and single particle tracking. Although the methods are limited by the localization errors of individual fluorophores, the pointwise localization precision has so far been estimated using theoretical best case approximations that disregard, for example, motion blur, defocus effects and variations in fluorescence intensity. Here, we show that pointwise localization precision can be accurately estimated directly from imaging data using the Bayesian posterior density constrained by simple microscope properties. We further demonstrate that the estimated localization precision can be used to improve downstream quantitative analysis, such as estimation of diffusion constants and detection of changes in molecular motion patterns. Finally, the quality of actual point localizations in live cell super-resolution microscopy can be improved beyond the information theoretic lower bound for localization errors in individual images, by modelling the movement of fluorophores and accounting for their pointwise localization uncertainty.

  • Pihl Karlsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Utförare miljöövervakning, IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet AB.
    Blomgren, Håkan
    Utförare miljöövervakning, IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet AB.
    Petersson, Kjell
    Utförare miljöövervakning, IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet AB.
    Svensson, Annika
    Utförare miljöövervakning, IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet AB.
    Sjöberg, Karin
    Utförare miljöövervakning, IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet AB.
    Nationell miljöövervakning av luft och nederbördskemi 20022003Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • Gonzalez, Grecia M.
    et al.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Biochem, Cambridge CB2 1GA, England..
    Hardwick, Steven W.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Biochem, Cambridge CB2 1GA, England..
    Maslen, Sarah L.
    MRC Lab Mol Biol, Cambridge CB2 0QH, England..
    Skehel, J. Mark
    MRC Lab Mol Biol, Cambridge CB2 0QH, England..
    Holmqvist, Erik
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Mikrobiologi.
    Vogel, Jörg
    Univ Wurzburg, Inst Mol Infect Biol, RNA Biol Grp, D-97080 Wurzburg, Germany.;Univ Wurzburg, Helmholtz Inst RNA Based Infect Res HIRI, D-97080 Wurzburg, Germany..
    Bateman, Alex
    European Bioinformat Inst EMBL EBI, European Mol Biol Lab, Wellcome Genome Campus, Cambridge CB10 1SD, England..
    Luisi, Ben F.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Biochem, Cambridge CB2 1GA, England..
    Broadhurst, R. William
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Biochem, Cambridge CB2 1GA, England..
    Structure of the Escherichia coli ProQ RNA-binding protein2017Ingår i: RNA: A publication of the RNA Society, ISSN 1355-8382, E-ISSN 1469-9001, Vol. 23, nr 5, 696-711 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The protein ProQ has recently been identified as a global small noncoding RNA-binding protein in Salmonella, and a similar role is anticipated for its numerous homologs in divergent bacterial species. We report the solution structure of Escherichia call ProQ, revealing an N-terminal FinO-like domain, a C-terminal domain that unexpectedly has a Tudor domain fold commonly found in eukaryotes, and an elongated bridging intradomain linker that is flexible but nonetheless incompressible. Structure-based sequence analysis suggests that the Tudor domain was acquired through horizontal gene transfer and gene fusion to the ancestral FinO-like domain. Through a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we have mapped putative RNA-binding surfaces on all three domains of ProQ and modeled the protein's conformation in the apo and RNA-bound forms. Taken together, these data suggest how the FinO, Tudor, and linker domains of ProQ cooperate to recognize complex RNA structures and serve to promote RNA-mediated regulation.

  • de Mello, Vanessa D.
    et al.
    Paananen, Jussi
    Lindstrom, Jaana
    Lankinen, Maria A.
    Shi, Lin
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Pihlajamaki, Jussi
    Auriola, Seppo
    Lehtonen, Marko
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Bergdahl, Ingvar A.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning.
    Nordin, Elise
    Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo
    Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka
    Landberg, Rikard
    Eriksson, Johan G.
    Tuomilehto, Jaakko
    Hanhineva, Kati
    Uusitupa, Matti
    Indolepropionic acid and novel lipid metabolites are associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study2017Ingår i: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, 46337Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Wide-scale profiling technologies including metabolomics broaden the possibility of novel discoveries related to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D). By applying non-targeted metabolomics approach, we investigated here whether serum metabolite profile predicts T2D in a well-characterized study population with impaired glucose tolerance by examining two groups of individuals who took part in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS); those who either early developed T2D (n = 96) or did not convert to T2D within the 15-year follow-up (n = 104). Several novel metabolites were associated with lower likelihood of developing T2D, including indole and lipid related metabolites. Higher indolepropionic acid was associated with reduced likelihood of T2D in the DPS. Interestingly, in those who remained free of T2D, indolepropionic acid and various lipid species were associated with better insulin secretion and sensitivity, respectively. Furthermore, these metabolites were negatively correlated with low-grade inflammation. We replicated the association between indolepropionic acid and T2D risk in one Finnish and one Swedish population. We suggest that indolepropionic acid, a gut microbiota-produced metabolite, is a potential biomarker for the development of T2D that may mediate its protective effect by preservation of alpha-cell function. Novel lipid metabolites associated with T2D may exert their effects partly through enhancing insulin sensitivity.

  • Jegermalm, Magnus
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademi Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Falun, Sverige.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping). Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. SALVE (Socialt arbete, Livssammanhang, Välfärd).
    Det svenska omsorgspanoramat - Givarnas perspektiv2017Ingår i: Tidsskrift for OmsorgsforskningArtikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [sv]

    Anhörigomsorg är i Sverige vanlig och möjligen ökande. Med tre undersökningar över tio år med befolkningsdata om omsorgsgivande beskriver vi detta och hur olika omsorgskällor överlappar för mottagaren. Huvudintrycket är att de ofta får flera olika slag av omsorg – huvudsakligen från släkt och offentlig omsorg – sett från givarens horisont. Undantaget är de som vårdar partner eller annan i det egna hushållet, den enda grupp som ofta står ensam och som ger omfattande omsorg. De utgör dock en liten grupp av alla omsorgsgivare. Vi kritiserar förenklande demografiska resonemang om minskande potential för anhörigomsorg.

  • Disputation: 2017-06-09 10:00 Sal B2
    Li, Zhou
    KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Materialvetenskap.
    First step to a genomic CALPHAD database for cemented carbides: C-Co-Cr alloys2017Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagrams) denotes the methodology used to assess thermodynamic data based on experiments as well as on first principles calculations. Essential for this method is the coupling of phase diagram and thermodynamic properties. It has been widely and successfully applied for decades in the field of materials science and engineering. Nevertheless, some shortcomings of the existing thermodynamic databases call for updated descriptions with improved thermodynamic modeling from unary, binary to ternary and higher-order systems. This thesis attempts to pioneer the development of a new generation of CALPHAD databases taking C-Co-Cr alloys with subsystems, unaries and binaries, as example. The present modeling and assessment work not only validate the new models applied in the development of the next, the 3rd, generation database, but also result in improved descriptions in a wider temperature range.In this 3rd generation database, thermodynamic descriptions are valid from 0 K up to high temperatures above liquidus. The Einstein model, rather than the polynomial basis functions used in the previous 2nd generation database, is applied to model the harmonic lattice vibration contribution to the heat capacity of condensed phases at low temperatures. In addition, terms describing the electronic excitations and anharmonic lattice vibrations, as well as the magnetic contribution, are added. A generalized two-state model is employed for the liquid phase to describe the gradual transition from the liquid to amorphous state. A revised magnetic model is adopted accounting for both the ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic states explicitly. A newly suggested method to avoid violating the 3rd law of thermodynamics is adopted for e.g. stoichiometric phases. However, there is still some concern as Nernst’s heat theorem which states that 𝑑𝐶𝑃/𝑑𝑇 is zero at 0 K is not obeyed. All solution phases are modelled within the framework of the compound energy formalism (CEF).The task of the thesis is to construct an updated self-consistent thermodynamic description of the C-Co-Cr system for the third generation CALPHAD databases. The improvement is significant from a modeling point of view when compared to the second generation database. A good agreement between the calculated thermodynamic properties and the experimental data is achieved. The reliability of the extrapolations of unary and binary systems into higher order systems is demonstrated.

  • Bedarf, J. R.
    et al.
    Univ Bonn, Dept Neurol, Bonn, Germany.;German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis Res DZNE, Bonn, Germany..
    Hildebrand, F.
    EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Coelho, L. P.
    EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Sunagawa, S.
    EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany.;Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Inst Microbiol, Vladimir Prelog 1-5-10, CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Bahram, Mohammad
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Systematisk biologi. Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth, 40 Lai St, EE-51005 Tartu, Estonia..
    Goeser, F.
    Univ Bonn, Dept Internal Med 1, Bonn, Germany.;German Ctr Infect Res DZIF, Bonn, Germany..
    Bork, P.
    EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany.;Heidelberg Univ, MMPU, Heidelberg, Germany.;European Mol Biol Lab, Heidelberg, Germany.;Max Delbruck Ctr Mol Med, D-13125 Berlin, Germany.;Univ Wurzburg, Dept Bioinformat, D-97074 Wurzburg, Germany.;Meyerhofstr 1, D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany..
    Wüllner, U.
    Univ Bonn, Dept Neurol, Bonn, Germany.;German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis Res DZNE, Bonn, Germany.;Sigmund Freud Str 25, D-53127 Bonn, Germany..
    Functional implications of microbial and viral gut metagenome changes in early stage L-DOPA-naive Parkinson's disease patients2017Ingår i: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 9, 39Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) presently is conceptualized as a protein aggregation disease in which pathology involves both the enteric and the central nervous system, possibly spreading from one to another via the vagus nerves. As gastrointestinal dysfunction often precedes or parallels motor symptoms, the enteric system with its vast diversity of microorganisms may be involved in PD pathogenesis. Alterations in the enteric microbial taxonomic level of L-DOPA-naive PD patients might also serve as a biomarker.

    Methods: We performed metagenomic shotgun analyses and compared the fecal microbiomes of 31 early stage, L-DOPA-naive PD patients to 28 age-matched controls.

    Results: We found increased Verrucomicrobiaceae (Akkermansia muciniphila) and unclassified Firmicutes, whereas Prevotellaceae (Prevotella copri) and Erysipelotrichaceae (Eubacterium biforme) were markedly lowered in PD samples. The observed differences could reliably separate PD from control with a ROC-AUC of 0.84. Functional analyses of the metagenomes revealed differences in microbiota metabolism in PD involving the beta-glucuronate and tryptophan metabolism. While the abundances of prophages and plasmids did not differ between PD and controls, total virus abundance was decreased in PD participants. Based on our analyses, the intake of either a MAO inhibitor, amantadine, or a dopamine agonist (which in summary relates to 90% of PD patients) had no overall influence on taxa abundance or microbial functions.

    Conclusions: Our data revealed differences of colonic microbiota and of microbiota metabolism between PD patients and controls at an unprecedented detail not achievable through 16S sequencing. The findings point to a yet unappreciated aspect of PD, possibly involving the intestinal barrier function and immune function in PD patients. The influence of the parkinsonian medication should be further investigated in the future in larger cohorts.

  • Abellan, A.
    et al.
    Perez, J.
    Pujol, R.
    Sundstrom, G.
    Jegermalm, Magnus
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Socialt arbete.
    Malmberg, B.
    Partner care, gender equality, and ageing in Spain and Sweden2017Ingår i: International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, ISSN 1652-8670, E-ISSN 1652-8670, Vol. 11, nr 1, 69-89 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We used national surveys to study how older persons’ changing household patterns influence the gender balance of caregiving in two countries with distinct household structures and cultures, Spain and Sweden. In both countries, men and women provide care equally often for their partner in couple-only households. This has become the most common household type among older persons in Spain and prevails altogether in Sweden. This challenges the traditional dominance of young or middle-aged women as primary caregivers in Spain. In Sweden, many caregivers are old themselves. We focus attention to partners as caregivers and the consequences of changing household structures for caregiving, which may be on the way to gender equality in both countries, with implications for families and for the public services.

  • Bertelsen, R. J.
    et al.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, POB 7804, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, Bergen, Norway..
    Rava, M.
    INSERM U1168, VIMA Aging & Chron Dis Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Appr, Villejuif, France.;Univ Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, UMR S 1168, Montigny Le Bretonneux, France.;Spanish Natl Canc Res Ctr CNIO, Genet & Mol Epidemiol Grp, Madrid, Spain..
    Carsin, A. E.
    Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain.;Univ Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain.;CIBERESP, Barcelona, Spain..
    Accordini, S.
    Univ Verona, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Verona, Italy..
    Benediktsdottir, B.
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Dratva, J.
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland..
    Franklin, K. A.
    Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Umea, Sweden..
    Heinrich, J.
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol 1, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Neuherberg, Germany.;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Inst & Outpatient Clin Occupat Social & Environm, Munich, Germany..
    Holm, M.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Janson, C.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Johannessen, A.
    Univ Bergen, Ctr Int Hlth, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Clin Res Ctr, Bergen, Norway..
    Jarvis, D. L.
    Imperial Coll, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, London, England..
    Jogi, R.
    Tartu Univ Hosp, Lung Clin, Tartu, Estonia..
    Leynaert, B.
    INSERM, UMR 1152, Pathophysiol & Epidemiol Resp Dis, Epidemiol Team, Paris, France.;Univ Paris Diderot Paris 7, UMR 1152, Paris, France..
    Norback, D.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Arbets- och miljömedicin.
    Omenaas, E. R.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, POB 7804, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Clin Res Ctr, Bergen, Norway..
    Raherison, C.
    Bordeaux Univ, INSERM U897, Bordeaux, France..
    Sanchez-Ramos, J. L.
    Univ Huelva, Dept Nursing, Huelva, Spain..
    Schlunssen, V.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark.;Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Dharmage, S. C.
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat Hlth, Allergy & Lung Hlth Unit, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Svanes, C.
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, Bergen, Norway.;Univ Bergen, Ctr Int Hlth, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Bergen, Norway..
    Clinical markers of asthma and IgE assessed in parents before conception predict asthma and hayfever in the offspring2017Ingår i: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 47, nr 5, 627-638 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Mice models suggest epigenetic inheritance induced by parental allergic disease activity. However, we know little of how parental disease activity before conception influences offspring's asthma and allergy in humans. Objective We aimed to assess the associations of parental asthma severity, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), and total and specific IgEs, measured before conception vs. after birth, with offspring asthma and hayfever. Methods The study included 4293 participants (mean age 34, 47% men) from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) with information on asthma symptom severity, BHR, total and specific IgEs from 1991 to 1993, and data on 9100 offspring born 1972-2012. Adjusted relative risk ratios (aRRR) for associations of parental clinical outcome with offspring allergic disease were estimated with multinomial logistic regressions. Results Offspring asthma with hayfever was more strongly associated with parental BHR and specific IgE measured before conception than after birth [BHR: aRRR = 2.96 (95% CI: 1.92, 4.57) and 1.40 (1.03, 1.91), respectively; specific IgEs: 3.08 (2.13, 4.45) and 1.83 (1.45, 2.31), respectively]. This was confirmed in a sensitivity analysis of a subgroup of offspring aged 11-22 years with information on parental disease activity both before and after birth. Conclusion & Clinical Relevance Parental BHR and specific IgE were associated with offspring asthma and hayfever, with the strongest associations observed with clinical assessment before conception as compared to after birth of the child. If the hypothesis is confirmed in other studies, parental disease activity assessed before conception may prove useful for identifying children at risk for developing asthma with hayfever.

  • Lind, Therese
    Södertörns högskola, Södertörns högskolebibliotek.
    Är vi pedagoger?: Rapport från projektet ”Pedagogisk plattform för Södertörns högskolebibliotek”2017Rapport (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • Lind, Therese
    Södertörns högskola, Södertörns högskolebibliotek.
    Pedagogiska samtal om informationssökning: ett högskolepedagogiskt utvecklingsprojekt för handledande bibliotekarier vid Södertörns högskolebibliotek2017Rapport (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • Backström, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, Umea, Sweden..
    Heynen, Martina
    Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Umea, Sweden..
    Brännäs, Eva
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, Umea, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Jan
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, Umea, Sweden..
    Winberg, Svante
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Fysiologi.
    Magnhagen, Carin
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, Umea, Sweden..
    Anaesthesia and handling stress effects on pigmentation and monoamines in Arctic charr2017Ingår i: Environmental Biology of Fishes, ISSN 0378-1909, E-ISSN 1573-5133, Vol. 100, nr 5, 471-480 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress responsiveness differs between individuals and is often categorized into different stress coping styles. Using these stress coping styles for selection in fish farming could be beneficial, since stress is one main factor affecting welfare. In Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) carotenoid pigmentation is associated with stress responsiveness and stress coping styles. Thus this could be an important tool to use for selection of stress resilient charr. However, anaesthetics seem to affect carotenoid pigmentation, and it would be better if the method for selection could be implemented during normal maintenance, which usually includes anaesthetics. Therefore, this study investigated how the use of anaesthetics affected carotenoid pigmentation, i.e. number of spots, over time compared to no-anaesthetic treatment. Additionally, the stress indicators monoamines and glucocorticoids were investigated. The results indicate that the anaesthetic MS-222 affects number of spots on the right side. This anaesthetic also increased dopaminergic activity in the telencephalon. Both brain dopaminergic and serotonergic activity was associated with spottiness. Further, behaviour during anaesthetization was associated with spots on the left side, but not the right side. Repetition of the same treatment seemed to affect spot numbers on the right side. In conclusion, this study shows that inducing stress in charr affects the carotenoid spots. Thus, it is possible to use anaesthetics when evaluating spottiness although careful planning is needed.

  • Disputation: 2017-06-15 10:00 B2, Stockholm
    Ma, Taoran
    KTH, Skolan för industriell teknik och management (ITM), Materialvetenskap.
    Powder-metallurgical processing and phase separation in ternary transition metal carbides2017Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Ternary transition metal cubic carbides have high hardness and are potential carbides in cemented carbide and cermet tools, as well as hard coatings used to improve metal cutting performance. In the present work, (Ti,Zr)C, (V,Nb)C, and (V,Ta)C ternary cubic carbides were synthesized using traditional powder-metallurgical methods. The effect of synthesis temperature and starting materials on synthesis is investigated, and the microstructure evolution during aging is studied.

    (Ti,Zr)C was found to decompose into lamellae upon aging at the temperature range from 1150 to 1800 °C. A similar microstructure was observed in (V,Ta)C and (V,Nb)C- 0.5 wt% Fe. All of these structures were found to form through discontinuous precipitation.

    The grain misorientation distribution of (Ti,Zr)C aged at 1400 °C is investigated. It was found that decomposition tends to occur at high-angle grain boundaries above 25°.

    The hardness of as-synthesized (Ti,Zr)C powder was found to be 41±6 GPa. Fully decomposed (Ti,Zr)C particles were found to be slightly softer, with a hardness of 34±3 GPa. On the other hand, in (V,Nb)C-0.5 wt% Fe, the decomposed structure formed upon aging at 1200 °C was found to have a hardness of 26±2 GPa, which is basically the same as the unaged alloy.

    Furthermore, the sintering behavior of (Ti,Zr)C with WC-Co is investigated. There are two γ-phases in the final microstructure, one TiC-rich and one ZrC-rich. (Ti,Zr)C was found to decompose at an early stage of sintering, and the final grain size of WC and the two γ-phases was found to be 10% smaller than that in a reference WC-TiC-ZrC-Co composite.

  • Justice, Anne E.
    et al.
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Winkler, Thomas W.
    Univ Regensburg, Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Dept Genet Epidemiol, D-93053 Regensburg, Germany..
    Feitosa, Mary F.
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Genet, Div Stat Genom, St Louis, MO 63108 USA..
    Graff, Misa
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Fisher, Virginia A.
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02118 USA..
    Young, Kristin
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Barata, Llilda
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Genet, Div Stat Genom, St Louis, MO 63108 USA..
    Deng, Xuan
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02118 USA..
    Czajkowski, Jacek
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Genet, Div Stat Genom, St Louis, MO 63108 USA..
    Hadley, David
    St Georges Univ London, Populat Hlth Res Inst, London SW17 0RE, England.;TransMed Syst Inc, Cupertino, CA 95014 USA..
    Ngwa, Julius S.
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Sect Metab Genet, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Steno Diabet Ctr, Gentofte, Denmark..
    Chu, Audrey Y.
    NHLBI Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA 01702 USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Prevent Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA..
    Heard-Costa, Nancy L.
    NHLBI Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA 01702 USA.;Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Neurol, Boston, MA 02118 USA..
    Lim, Elise
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02118 USA..
    Perez, Jeremiah
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02118 USA..
    Eicher, John D.
    Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, NIH, Natl Heart Lung & Blood Inst, Populat Sci Branch, Framingham, MA USA..
    Kutalik, Zoltan
    CHU Vaudois, Inst Social & Prevent Med IUMSP, Lausanne, Switzerland.;Univ Lausanne, Dept Computat Biol, Lausanne, Switzerland.;Swiss Inst Bioinformat, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Xue, Luting
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02118 USA..
    Mahajan, Anubha
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford OX3 7BN, England..
    Renstrom, Frida
    Umea Univ, Dept Biobank Res, Umea, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Genet & Mol Epidemiol Unit, SE-20502 Malmo, Sweden..
    Wu, Joseph
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02118 USA..
    Qi, Qibin
    Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Bronx, NY 10467 USA..
    Ahmad, Shafqat
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Prevent Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Genet & Mol Epidemiol Unit, SE-20502 Malmo, Sweden.;Harvard T H Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Alfred, Tamuno
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Charles Bronfman Inst Personalized Med, New York, NY 10029 USA.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Genet Obes & Related Metab Traits Program, New York, NY USA..
    Amin, Najaf
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Epidemiol, Genet Epidemiol Unit, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Bielak, Lawrence F.
    Univ Michigan, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Bonnefond, Amelie
    Univ Lille, CNRS, Inst Pasteur Lille, EGID,UMR 8199, Lille, France..
    Bragg, Jennifer
    Univ Michigan, Internal Med Nephrol, Ann Arbor, MI USA.;Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.;Univ Michigan, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Cadby, Gemma
    Univ Western Australia, Ctr Genet Origins Hlth & Dis, Crawley 6009, Australia..
    Chittani, Martina
    Univ Milan, Dept Hlth Sci, Via A Di Rudini 8, I-20142 Milan, Italy..
    Coggeshall, Scott
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Corre, Tanguy
    CHU Vaudois, Inst Social & Prevent Med IUMSP, Lausanne, Switzerland.;Univ Lausanne, Dept Computat Biol, Lausanne, Switzerland.;Swiss Inst Bioinformat, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Direk, Nese
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Dokuz Eylul Univ, Dept Psychiat, Izmir, Turkey..
    Eriksson, Joel
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res,Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Fischer, Krista
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, EE-51010 Tartu, Estonia..
    Gorski, Mathias
    Univ Regensburg, Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Dept Genet Epidemiol, D-93053 Regensburg, Germany.;Univ Hosp Regensburg, Dept Nephrol, Regensburg, Germany..
    Harder, Marie Neergaard
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Sect Metab Genet, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Horikoshi, Momoko
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford OX3 7BN, England.;Univ Oxford, Churchill Hosp, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford OX3 7LJ, England..
    Huang, Tao
    Harvard T H Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Natl Univ Singapore, Saw Swee Hock Sch Publ Hlth, Epidemiol Domain, Singapore 117549, Singapore..
    Huffman, Jennifer E.
    Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, NIH, Natl Heart Lung & Blood Inst, Populat Sci Branch, Framingham, MA USA.;Univ Edinburgh, Inst Genet & Mol Med, MRC Human Genet Unit, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Jackson, Anne U.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.;Univ Michigan, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Justesen, Johanne Marie
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Sect Metab Genet, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Kanoni, Stavroula
    Queen Mary Univ London, Barts & London Sch Med & Dent, William Harvey Res Inst, London, England..
    Kinnunen, Leena
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welfare, Dept Hlth, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland..
    Kleber, Marcus E.
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Dept Med 5, Mannheim, Germany..
    Komulainen, Pirjo
    Kuopio Res Inst Exercise Med, Kuopio, Finland..
    Kumari, Meena
    Univ Essex, ISER, Colchester CO4 3SQ, Essex, England.;UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England..
    Lim, Unhee
    Univ Hawaii, Canc Ctr, Epidemiol Program, Honolulu, HI 96813 USA..
    Luan, Jian'an
    Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere 33520, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Fac Med & Life Sci, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Mangino, Massimo
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, London, England.;Guys & St Thomas Fdn Trust, NIHR Biomed Res Ctr, London, England..
    Manichaikul, Ani
    Univ Virginia, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Ctr Publ Hlth Genom, Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA.;Univ Virginia, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Biostat Sect, Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA..
    Marten, Jonathan
    Univ Edinburgh, Inst Genet & Mol Med, MRC Human Genet Unit, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Middelberg, Rita P. S.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Genet Epidemiol, Brisbane, Qld 4029, Australia..
    Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Genet Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Univ Hosp Grosshadern, Dept Med 1, D-81377 Munich, Germany.;DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany..
    Navarro, Pau
    Univ Edinburgh, Inst Genet & Mol Med, MRC Human Genet Unit, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Perusse, Louis
    Univ Laval, Fac Med, Dept Kinesiol, Quebec City G1V 0A6, PQ, Canada.;Univ Laval, Inst Nutr & Funct Foods, Quebec City G1V 0A6, PQ, Canada..
    Pervjakova, Natalia
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, EE-51010 Tartu, Estonia.;Univ Tartu, Inst Mol & Cell Biol, Dept Biotechnol, EE-51010 Tartu, Estonia..
    Sarti, Cinzia
    Dept Social & Hlth Care, Helsinki, Finland..
    Smith, Albert Vernon
    Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Smith, Jennifer A.
    Univ Michigan, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Stancakova, Alena
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med, Dept Med, Kuopio 70210, Finland..
    Strawbridge, Rona J.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Cardiovasc Med Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stringham, Heather M.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.;Univ Michigan, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Sung, Yun Ju
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Div Biostat, St Louis, MO 63110 USA..
    Tanaka, Toshiko
    Natl Inst Aging, Translat Gerontol Branch, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Teumer, Alexander
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany..
    Trompet, Stella
    Leiden Univ, Dept Cardiol, Med Ctr, Leiden, Netherlands.;Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Gerontol & Geriatr, Leiden, Netherlands..
    van der Laan, Sander W.
    UMC Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Lab Expt Cardiol, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    van der Most, Peter J.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Endocrinol, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Vedantam, Sailaja L.
    Boston Childrens Hosp, Div Endocrinol, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Boston Childrens Hosp, Div Genet, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Boston Childrens Hosp, Ctr Basic & Translat Obes Res, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Broad Inst Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA..
    Verweij, Niek
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Cardiol, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Vink, Jacqueline M.
    Vrije Univ, Dept Biol Psychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Behav Sci Inst, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Vitart, Veronique
    Univ Edinburgh, Inst Genet & Mol Med, MRC Human Genet Unit, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Wu, Ying
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Genet, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Yengo, Loic
    Univ Lille, CNRS, Inst Pasteur Lille, EGID,UMR 8199, Lille, France..
    Zhang, Weihua
    Imper Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England.;Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Cardiol, Southall, Middx, England..
    Zhao, Jing Hua
    Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Zimmermann, Martina E.
    Univ Regensburg, Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Dept Genet Epidemiol, D-93053 Regensburg, Germany..
    Zubair, Niha
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Abecasis, Goncalo R.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.;Univ Michigan, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Adair, Linda S.
    Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Afaq, Saima
    Imper Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England.;Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Cardiol, Southall, Middx, England..
    Afzal, Uzma
    Imper Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England.;Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Cardiol, Southall, Middx, England..
    Bakker, Stephan J. L.
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Univ Groningen, Dept Med, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Bartz, Traci M.
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA 98101 USA..
    Beilby, John
    Busselton Populat Med Res Inst, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia.;Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, PathWest Lab Med WA, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia.;Univ Western Australia, Sch Pathol, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.;Univ Western Australia, Laboraty Med, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia..
    Bergman, Richard N.
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Diabet & Obes Res Inst, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA..
    Bergmann, Sven
    Univ Lausanne, Dept Computat Biol, Lausanne, Switzerland.;Swiss Inst Bioinformat, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Biffar, Reiner
    Univ Med Greifswald, Clin Prosthet Dent Gerostomatol & Mat Sci, Greifswald, Germany..
    Blangero, John
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Brownsville, TX USA..
    Boerwinkle, Eric
    Univ Texas Hlth Sci Ctr, Human Genet Ctr, POB 20186, Houston, TX 77225 USA..
    Bonnycastle, Lori L.
    Natl Human Genome Res Inst, Med Genom & Metab Genet Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Bottinger, Erwin
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Charles Bronfman Inst Personalized Med, New York, NY 10029 USA.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Pharmacol & Syst Therapeut, New York, NY USA..
    Braga, Daniele
    Univ Milan, Dept Hlth Sci, Via A Di Rudini 8, I-20142 Milan, Italy..
    Buckley, Brendan M.
    Univ Coll Cork, Dept Pharmacol & Therapeut, Cork, Ireland..
    Buyske, Steve
    Rutgers State Univ, Dept Genet, Piscataway, NJ 08854 USA.;Rutgers State Univ, Dept Stat & Biostat, Piscataway, NJ 08854 USA..
    Campbell, Harry
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Chambers, John C.
    Imper Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England.;Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Cardiol, Southall, Middx, England.;Imperial Coll Healthcare NHS Trust, London, England..
    Collins, Francis S.
    Natl Human Genome Res Inst, Med Genom & Metab Genet Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Curran, Joanne E.
    Univ Texas Rio Grande Valley, South Texas Diabet & Obes Inst, Brownsville, TX USA..
    de Borst, Gert J.
    UMC Utrecht, Dept Vasc Surg, Div Surg Specialties, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    de Craen, Anton J. M.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Gerontol & Geriatr, Leiden, Netherlands..
    de Geus, Eco J. C.
    Vrije Univ, Dept Biol Psychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ, FMGO Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Dedoussis, George
    Harokopio Univ, Sch Hlth Sci & Educ, Dept Nutr & Dietet, Athens, Greece..
    Delgado, Graciela E.
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Dept Med 5, Mannheim, Germany..
    den Ruijter, Hester M.
    UMC Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Lab Expt Cardiol, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Eiriksdottir, Gudny
    Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland..
    Eriksson, Anna L.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res,Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Esko, Tonu
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, EE-51010 Tartu, Estonia.;Boston Childrens Hosp, Div Endocrinol, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Boston Childrens Hosp, Div Genet, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Boston Childrens Hosp, Ctr Basic & Translat Obes Res, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Broad Inst Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA..
    Faul, Jessica D.
    Univ Michigan, Inst Social Res, Survey Res Ctr, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Ford, Ian
    Univ Glasgow, Robertson Ctr Biostat, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Forrester, Terrence
    Univ West Indies, Trop Med Res Inst, Trop Metab Res Unit, Mona JMAAW15, Jamaica, NY USA..
    Gertow, Karl
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Cardiovasc Med Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gigante, Bruna
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Glorioso, Nicola
    Univ Sassari, Hypertens & Related Dis Ctr, AOU, Sassari, Italy..
    Gong, Jian
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Grallert, Harald
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol 2, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;German Ctr Diabet Res, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany..
    Grammer, Tanja B.
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Dept Med 5, Mannheim, Germany..
    Grarup, Niels
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Sect Metab Genet, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Haitjema, Saskia
    UMC Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Lab Expt Cardiol, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Hallmans, Goran
    Umea Univ, Sect Nutr Res, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden..
    Hamsten, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Cardiovasc Med Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hansen, Torben
    St Georges Univ London, Populat Hlth Res Inst, London SW17 0RE, England..
    Harris, Tamara B.
    Natl Inst Aging, NIH, Lab Epidemiol Demog & Biometry, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Hartman, Catharina A.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Interdisciplinary Ctr Psychopathol & Emot Regulat, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Hassinen, Maija
    Kuopio Res Inst Exercise Med, Kuopio, Finland..
    Hastie, Nicholas D.
    Univ Edinburgh, Inst Genet & Mol Med, MRC Human Genet Unit, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Heath, Andrew C.
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, St Louis, MO 63110 USA..
    Hernandez, Dena
    Natl Inst Aging, Lab Neurogenet, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Hindorff, Lucia
    Natl Human Genome Res Inst, NIH, Div Genom Med, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Hocking, Lynne J.
    Univ Aberdeen, Inst Med Sci, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Genom & Expt Med, Generat Scotland, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Hollensted, Mette
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Sect Metab Genet, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Holmen, Oddgeir L.
    Univ Trondheim Hosp, St Olav Hosp, Trondheim, Norway..
    Homuth, Georg
    Univ Med Greifswald, Interfac Inst Genet & Funct Genom, Greifswald, Germany..
    Hottenga, Jouke Jan
    Vrije Univ, Dept Biol Psychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Huang, Jie
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Dept Human Genet, Cambridge, England..
    Hung, Joseph
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Med & Pharmacol, 25 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.;Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia..
    Hutri-Kahonen, Nina
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Tampere 33521, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Fac Med & Life Sci, Dept Pediat, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Molekylär epidemiologi. Uppsala universitet, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    James, Alan L.
    Busselton Populat Med Res Inst, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia.;Univ Western Australia, Sch Med & Pharmacol, 25 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.;Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, Dept Pulm Physiol & Sleep Med, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia..
    Jansson, John-Olov
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Dept Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta
    Imperial Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, MRC PHE Ctr Environm & Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Norfolk Pl, London, England.;Univ Oulu, Fac Med, Ctr Life Course Epidemiol, POB 5000, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland.;Univ Oulu, Bioctr Oulu, Oulu, Finland.;Oulu Univ Hosp, Unit Primary Care, Kajaanintie 50,POB 20, FI-90220 Oulu, Finland..
    Jhun, Min A.
    Univ Michigan, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Jorgensen, Marit E.
    Steno Diabet Ctr, Gentofte, Denmark..
    Juonala, Markus
    Univ Turku, Dept Med, Turku 20520, Finland.;Turku Univ Hosp, Div Med, Turku 20521, Finland..
    Kahonen, Mika
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol, Tampere 33521, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Fac Med & Life Sci, Dept Clin Physiol, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped & Clin Sci, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res Unit, Malmo, Sweden..
    Koistinen, Heikki A.
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welfare, Dept Hlth, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Endocrinol, Dept Med, FI-00029 Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Endocrinol, Abdominal Ctr, FI-00029 Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Cent Hosp, FI-00029 Helsinki, Finland.;Minerva Fdn, Biomed 2U, FI-00290 Helsinki, Finland..
    Kolcic, Ivana
    Univ Split, Fac Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Split, Croatia..
    Kolovou, Genovefa
    Onassis Cardiac Surg Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Athens, Greece..
    Kooperberg, Charles
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Kramer, Bernhard K.
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Dept Med 5, Mannheim, Germany..
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Med, Kuopio 70210, Finland.;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Kuopio 70210, Finland..
    Kvaloy, Kirsti
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, HUNT Res Ctr, N-7600 Levanger, Norway..
    Lakka, Timo A.
    Kuopio Res Inst Exercise Med, Kuopio, Finland.;Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Biomed Physiol, Kuopio, Finland..
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Launer, Lenore J.
    Natl Inst Aging, NIH, Lab Epidemiol Demog & Biometry, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Leander, Karin
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lee, Nanette R.
    Univ San Carlos, Off Populat Studies Fdn Inc, Cebu 6000, Philippines.;Univ San Carlos, Dept Anthropol Sociol & Hist, Cebu 6000, Philippines..
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Kardiovaskulär epidemiologi.
    Lindgren, Cecilia M.
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford OX3 7BN, England.;Univ Oxford, Big Data Inst, Li Ka Shing Ctr Hlth Informat & Discovery, Oxford OX3 7BN, England. Res Ctr Prevent & Hlth, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Linneberg, Allan
    Minerva Fdn, Biomed 2U, FI-00290 Helsinki, Finland.;Rigshosp, Dept Clin Expt Res, Glostrup, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Dept Clin Med, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Lobbens, Stephane
    Univ Lille, CNRS, Inst Pasteur Lille, EGID,UMR 8199, Lille, France..
    Loh, Marie
    Imper Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England.;ASTAR, Agcy Sci Technol & Res, Translat Lab Genet Med TLGM, 8A Biomed Grove,Immunos Level 5, Singapore 138648, Singapore..
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res,Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Luben, Robert
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England..
    Lubke, Gitta
    Univ Notre Dame, Dept Psychol, Notre Dame, IN 46556 USA..
    Ludolph-Donislawski, Anja
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Genet Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Chair Genet Epidemiol, Inst Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, D-81377 Munich, Germany..
    Lupoli, Sara
    Univ Milan, Dept Hlth Sci, Via A Di Rudini 8, I-20142 Milan, Italy..
    Madden, Pamela A. F.
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, St Louis, MO 63110 USA..
    Mannikko, Reija
    Kuopio Res Inst Exercise Med, Kuopio, Finland..
    Marques-Vidal, Pedro
    Lausanne Univ Hosp CHUV, Dept Med Internal Med, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Martin, Nicholas G.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Genet Epidemiol, Brisbane, Qld 4029, Australia..
    McKenzie, Colin A.
    Univ West Indies, Trop Med Res Inst, Trop Metab Res Unit, Mona JMAAW15, Jamaica, NY USA..
    McKnight, Barbara
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA 98101 USA.;Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Program Biostat & Biomath, Seattle, WA 98109 USA..
    Mellstrom, Dan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res,Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Menni, Cristina
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, London, England..
    Montgomery, Grant W.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Mol Epidemiol, Brisbane, Qld 4029, Australia..
    Musk, A. W. (Bill)
    Busselton Populat Med Res Inst, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia.;Univ Western Australia, Sch Populat Hlth, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.;Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, Dept Resp Med, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia..
    Narisu, Narisu
    Natl Human Genome Res Inst, Med Genom & Metab Genet Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Nauck, Matthias
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Clin Chem, Greifswald, Germany.;Univ Med Greifswald, Lab Med, Greifswald, Germany..
    Nolte, Ilja M.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Oldehinkel, Albertine J.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Interdisciplinary Ctr Psychopathol & Emot Regulat, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Olden, Matthias
    Univ Regensburg, Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Dept Genet Epidemiol, D-93053 Regensburg, Germany..
    Ong, Ken K.
    Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Padmanabhan, Sandosh
    Univ Aberdeen, Inst Med Sci, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, Scotland.;Univ Glasgow, BHF Glasgow CardiovascRes Ctr, Inst Cardiovasc & Med Sci, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Peyser, Patricia A.
    Univ Michigan, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Pisinger, Charlotta
    Glostrup Cty Hosp, Res Ctr Prevent & Hlth, Glostrup, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth Sci, Dept Publ Hlth, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Porteous, David J.
    Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Genom & Expt Med, Generat Scotland, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Inst Genet & Mol Med, Ctr Genom & Expt Med, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Raitakari, Olli T.
    Turku Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol & Nucl Med, Turku 20521, Finland.;Univ Turku, Res Ctr Appl & Prevent Cardiovasc Med, Turku 20520, Finland..
    Rankinen, Tuomo
    Pennington Biomed Res Ctr, Human Genom Lab, 6400 Perkins Rd, Baton Rouge, LA 70808 USA..
    Rao, D. C.
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Div Biostat, St Louis, MO 63110 USA.;Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, St Louis, MO 63110 USA.;Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, St Louis, MO 63110 USA..
    Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.
    Northwestern Univ, Feinberg Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Chicago, IL 60611 USA..
    Rawal, Rajesh
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol 2, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany..
    Rice, Treva
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Div Biostat, St Louis, MO 63110 USA.;Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Med, Kuopio 70210, Finland.;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Kuopio 70210, Finland..
    Ridker, Paul M.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Prevent Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Cardiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Rose, Lynda M.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Prevent Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA..
    Bien, Stephanie A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Rudan, Igor
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Sanna, Serena
    Cittadella Univ Monserrato, CNR, IRGB, I-09042 Monserrato, Italy..
    Sarzynski, Mark A.
    Pennington Biomed Res Ctr, Human Genom Lab, 6400 Perkins Rd, Baton Rouge, LA 70808 USA..
    Sattar, Naveed
    BHF Glasgow Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Fac Med, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Savonen, Kai
    Kuopio Res Inst Exercise Med, Kuopio, Finland..
    Schlessinger, David
    Natl Inst Aging, NIH, Lab Genet, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Scholtens, Salome
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Schurmann, Claudia
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Charles Bronfman Inst Personalized Med, New York, NY 10029 USA.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Genet Obes & Related Metab Traits Program, New York, NY USA..
    Scott, Robert A.
    Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Sennblad, Bengt
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Cardiovasc Med Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Siemelink, Marten A.
    UMC Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Lab Expt Cardiol, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Silbernagel, Gunther
    Med Univ Graz, Dept Internal Med, Div Angiol, Graz, Austria..
    Slagboom, P. Eline
    Leiden Univ, Dept Mol Epidemiol, Med Ctr, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Snieder, Harold
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Staessen, Jan A.
    Univ Leuven, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Res Unit Hypertens & Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Campus Sint Rafael,Kapucijnenvoer 35, Leuven, Belgium.;Maastricht Univ, R&D VitaK Grp, Brains Unlimited Bldg,Oxfordlaan 55, Maastricht, Netherlands..
    Stott, David J.
    Univ Glasgow, Inst Cardiovasc & Med Sci, Fac Med, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Swertz, Morris A.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Genet, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Swift, Amy J.
    Natl Human Genome Res Inst, Med Genom & Metab Genet Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Taylor, Kent D.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Med Ctr, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst Harbor, Ctr Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Torrance, CA USA.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Pediat, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Tayo, Bamidele O.
    Loyola Univ Chicago, Stritch Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Maywood, IL 61053 USA..
    Thorand, Barbara
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol 2, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;German Ctr Diabet Res, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany..
    Thuillier, Dorothee
    Univ Lille, CNRS, Inst Pasteur Lille, EGID,UMR 8199, Lille, France..
    Tuomilehto, Jaakko
    Dasman Diabet Inst, Res Div, Kuwait, Kuwait.;Danube Univ Krems, Dept Neurosci & Prevent Med, Krems 3500, Austria. Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Chron Dis Prevent Unit, Helsinki, Finland.;King Abdulaziz Univ, Saudi Diabet Res Grp, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia..
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Vandenput, Liesbeth
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res,Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Vohl, Marie-Claude
    Univ Laval, Inst Nutr & Funct Foods, Quebec City G1V 0A6, PQ, Canada.;Univ Laval, Sch Nutr, Laval, PQ, Canada..
    Volzke, Henry
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany..
    Vonk, Judith M.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Waeber, Gerard
    Lausanne Univ Hosp CHUV, Dept Med Internal Med, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Waldenberger, Melanie
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol 2, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany..
    Westendorp, R. G. J.
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Publ Hlth, DK-1014 Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Ctr Healthy Aging, DK-1014 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Wild, Sarah
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Willemsen, Gonneke
    Vrije Univ, Dept Biol Psychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Endocrinol, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Wong, Andrew
    UCL, MRC Unit Lifelong Hlth & Ageing, 33 Bedford Pl, London WC1B 5JU, England..
    Wright, Alan F.
    Univ Edinburgh, Inst Genet & Mol Med, MRC Human Genet Unit, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Zhao, Wei
    Univ Michigan, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Zillikens, M. Carola
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Baldassarre, Damiano
    Univ Milan, Dipartimento Sci Farmacolog & Biomol, Milan, Italy.;IRCCS, Ctr Cardiolog Monzino, Milan, Italy..
    Balkau, Beverley
    INSERM, U 1018, F-94807 Villejuif, France..
    Bandinelli, Stefania
    Azienda USL Toscana Ctr, Geriatr Unit, Florence, Italy..
    Boger, Carsten A.
    Univ Hosp Regensburg, Dept Nephrol, Regensburg, Germany..
    Boomsma, Dorret I.
    Vrije Univ, Dept Biol Psychol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Bouchard, Claude
    Pennington Biomed Res Ctr, Human Genom Lab, 6400 Perkins Rd, Baton Rouge, LA 70808 USA..
    Bruinenberg, Marcel
    Lifelines Cohort Study, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Chasman, Daniel I.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Prevent Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Genet, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Chen, Yii-Der Ida
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Los Angeles BioMed Res Inst, Inst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Torrance, CA 90502 USA.;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Pediat Harbor, Torrance, CA 90502 USA..
    Chines, Peter S.
    Natl Human Genome Res Inst, Med Genom & Metab Genet Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Cooper, Richard S.
    Loyola Univ Chicago, Stritch Sch Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Maywood, IL 61053 USA..
    Cucca, Francesco
    Cittadella Univ Monserrato, CNR, IRGB, I-09042 Monserrato, Italy.;Univ Sassari, Dipartimento Sci Biomed, Sassari, Italy..
    Cusi, Daniele
    Sanipedia Srl, Bresso, Milano, Italy.;Inst Biomed Technol Natl Ctr Res Segrate, Milan, Italy..
    de Faire, Ulf
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    Natl Inst Aging, Translat Gerontol Branch, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Franks, Paul W.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Genet & Mol Epidemiol Unit, SE-20502 Malmo, Sweden.;Harvard T H Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden..
    Froguel, Philippe
    Univ Lille, CNRS, Inst Pasteur Lille, EGID,UMR 8199, Lille, France.;Imperial Coll London, Dept Genom Common Dis, London, England..
    Gordon-Larsen, Penny
    Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.;Univ N Carolina, Carolina Populat Ctr, Chapel Hill, NC 27516 USA..
    Grabe, Hans-Jorgen
    Univ Med Greifswald, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Greifswald, Germany.;German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis DZNE, Rostock & Greifswald Site, Greifswald, Germany..
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Haiman, Christopher A.
    Univ Southern Calif, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA..
    Hayward, Caroline
    Univ Edinburgh, Inst Genet & Mol Med, MRC Human Genet Unit, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Ctr Genom & Expt Med, Generat Scotland, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Hveem, Kristian
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Publ Hlth & Nursing, HUNT Res Ctr, N-7600 Levanger, Norway..
    Johnson, Andrew D.
    Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, NIH, Natl Heart Lung & Blood Inst, Populat Sci Branch, Framingham, MA USA..
    Jukema, Wouter
    Leiden Univ, Dept Cardiol, Med Ctr, Leiden, Netherlands.;Durrer Ctr Cardiogenet Res, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Interuniv Cardiol Inst Netherlands, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Kardia, Sharon L. R.
    Univ Michigan, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Kivimaki, Mika
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England..
    Kooner, Jaspal S.
    Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Cardiol, Southall, Middx, England.;Imperial Coll Healthcare NHS Trust, London, England.;Imperial Coll London, Hammersmith Hosp, Fac Med, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Hammersmith Campus, London, England..
    Kuh, Diana
    UCL, MRC Unit Lifelong Hlth & Ageing, 33 Bedford Pl, London WC1B 5JU, England..
    Laakso, Markku
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Med, Kuopio 70210, Finland.;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Kuopio 70210, Finland..
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere 33520, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Fac Med & Life Sci, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Univ Hawaii, Canc Ctr, Epidemiol Program, Honolulu, HI 96813 USA..
    Marz, Winfried
    Synlab Serv GmbH, Synlab Acad, Mannheim, Germany.;Med Univ Graz, Clin Inst Med, Graz, Austria.;Med Univ Graz, Chem Lab Diagnost, Graz, Austria..
    McCarthy, Mark I.
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford OX3 7BN, England.;Univ Oxford, Churchill Hosp, Oxford Ctr Diabet Endocrinol & Metab, Oxford OX3 7LJ, England.;Churchill Hosp, Biomed Res Ctr, Oxford Natl Inst Hlth Res NIHR, Oxford, England..
    Metspalu, Andres
    Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, EE-51010 Tartu, Estonia..
    Morris, Andrew P.
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford OX3 7BN, England.;Univ Liverpool, Dept Biostat, Liverpool L69 3GL, Merseyside, England..
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res,Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Palmer, Lyle J.
    Univ Adelaide, Sch Publ Hlth, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia..
    Pasterkamp, Gerard
    UMC Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Lab Expt Cardiol, Utrecht, Netherlands.;UMC Utrecht, Div Labs & Pharm, Lab Clin Chem & Hematol, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Pedersen, Oluf
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Sect Metab Genet, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Peters, Annette
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol 2, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;German Ctr Diabet Res, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany..
    Peters, Ulrike
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Polasek, Ozren
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Split, Fac Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Split, Croatia..
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98101 USA.;Grp Hlth Cooperat Puget Sound, Grp Hlth Res Inst, Seattle, WA 98101 USA..
    Qi, Lu
    Harvard T H Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Tulane Univ, Sch Publ Hlth & Trop Med, Dept Epidemiol, New Orleans, LA 70118 USA..
    Rauramaa, Rainer
    Kuopio Res Inst Exercise Med, Kuopio, Finland..
    Smith, Blair H.
    Kuopio Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol & Nucl Med, Kuopio, Finland. Univ Dundee, Ninewells Hosp, Div Populat Hlth Sci, Dundee DD2 4RB, Scotland. Univ Dundee, Med Sch, Dundee DD2 4RB, Scotland..
    Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Sect Metab Genet, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Bispebjerg & Frederiksberg Hosp, Dept Clin Epidemiol, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Bristol, MRC Integrat Epidemiol Unit, Bristol, Avon, England..
    Strauch, Konstantin
    German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Genet Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Chair Genet Epidemiol, Inst Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, D-81377 Munich, Germany..
    Tiemeier, Henning
    Erasmus MC, Dept Psychiat, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Tremoli, Elena
    Univ Milan, Dipartimento Sci Farmacolog & Biomol, Milan, Italy.;IRCCS, Ctr Cardiolog Monzino, Milan, Italy..
    Van der Harst, Pim
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Genet, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.;Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Genet, Groningen, Netherlands.;ICIN Netherlands Heart Inst, Durrer Ctr Cardiogenet Res, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Vestergaard, Henrik
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Sect Metab Genet, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Steno Diabet Ctr, Gentofte, Denmark..
    Vollenweider, Peter
    Lausanne Univ Hosp CHUV, Dept Med Internal Med, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Weir, David R.
    Univ Michigan, Inst Social Res, Survey Res Ctr, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Whitfield, John B.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Genet Epidemiol, Brisbane, Qld 4029, Australia..
    Wilson, James F.
    Univ Edinburgh, Inst Genet & Mol Med, MRC Human Genet Unit, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.;Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Tyrrell, Jessica
    Univ Exeter, Med Sch, Genet Complex Traits, RILD Bldg, Exeter EX2 5DW, Devon, England.;Univ Exeter, European Ctr Environm & Human Hlth, Med Sch, Truro TR1 3HD, England..
    Frayling, Timothy M.
    Univ Exeter, Med Sch, Genet Complex Traits, Exeter EX1 2LU, Devon, England..
    Barroso, Ines
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Cambridge, England.;Addenbrookes Hosp, Inst Metab Sci, NIHR Cambridge Biomed Res Ctr, Box 289,Level 4, Cambridge CB2 OQQ, England.;Univ Cambridge, Addenbrookes Hosp, Metab Res Labs, Inst Metab Sci, Level 4,Box 289, Cambridge CB2 OQQ, England..
    Boehnke, Michael
    Univ Michigan, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.;Univ Michigan, Ctr Stat Genet, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Deloukas, Panagiotis
    Queen Mary Univ London, Barts & London Sch Med & Dent, William Harvey Res Inst, London, England.;Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Cambridge, England.;King Abdulaziz Univ, PACER HD, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia..
    Fox, Caroline S.
    NHLBI Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA 01702 USA..
    Hirschhorn, Joel N.
    Boston Childrens Hosp, Div Endocrinol, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Boston Childrens Hosp, Div Genet, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Boston Childrens Hosp, Ctr Basic & Translat Obes Res, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Broad Inst Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Genet, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Hunter, David J.
    Harvard T H Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Broad Inst Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.;Harvard T H Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Spector, Tim D.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, London, England..
    Strachan, David P.
    St Georges Univ London, Populat Hlth Res Inst, London SW17 0RE, England.;St Georges Univ London, Div Populat Hlth Sci & Educ, London SW17 0RE, England..
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Epidemiol, Genet Epidemiol Unit, NL-3015 GE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Netherlands Consortium Healthy Aging, Netherlands Genom Initiat, Leiden, Netherlands.;Ctr Med Syst Biol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Heid, Iris M.
    Univ Regensburg, Inst Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Dept Genet Epidemiol, D-93053 Regensburg, Germany.;German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Genet Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany..
    Mohlke, Karen L.
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Genet, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Marchini, Jonathan
    Univ Oxford, Dept Stat, Oxford, England..
    Loos, Ruth J. F.
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Charles Bronfman Inst Personalized Med, New York, NY 10029 USA.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Genet Obes & Related Metab Traits Program, New York, NY USA.;Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.;Mt Sinai Sch Med, New York, NY 10029 USA.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Mindich Child Hlth & Dev Inst, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Kilpelainen, Tuomas O.
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Sect Metab Genet, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Prevent Med, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Liu, Ching-Ti
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02118 USA..
    Borecki, Ingrid B.
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, Dept Genet, Div Stat Genom, St Louis, MO 63108 USA..
    North, Kari E.
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Cupples, L. Adrienne
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02118 USA.;NHLBI Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA 01702 USA..
    Genome-wide meta-analysis of 241,258 adults accounting for smoking behaviour identifies novel loci for obesity traits2017Ingår i: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, 14977Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) account for environmental exposures, like smoking, potentially impacting the overall trait variance when investigating the genetic contribution to obesity-related traits. Here, we use GWAS data from 51,080 current smokers and 190,178 nonsmokers (87% European descent) to identify loci influencing BMI and central adiposity, measured as waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio both adjusted for BMI. We identify 23 novel genetic loci, and 9 loci with convincing evidence of gene-smoking interaction (GxSMK) on obesity-related traits. We show consistent direction of effect for all identified loci and significance for 18 novel and for 5 interaction loci in an independent study sample. These loci highlight novel biological functions, including response to oxidative stress, addictive behaviour, and regulatory functions emphasizing the importance of accounting for environment in genetic analyses. Our results suggest that tobacco smoking may alter the genetic susceptibility to overall adiposity and body fat distribution.

  • Tobiasson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Ctr Hematol & Regenerat Med, Dept Med Huddinge, Div Hematol,Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Abdulkadir, Hani
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Ctr Hematol & Regenerat Med, Dept Med Huddinge, Div Hematol,Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Lennartsson, Andreas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Stockholm Count, Sweden..
    Katayama, Shintaro
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Stockholm Count, Sweden..
    Marabita, Francesco
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Ctr Mol Med, Unit Computat Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Natl Bioinformat Infrastruct Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden..
    De Paepe, Ayla
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Ctr Hematol & Regenerat Med, Dept Med Huddinge, Div Hematol,Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Karimi, Mohsen
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Ctr Hematol & Regenerat Med, Dept Med Huddinge, Div Hematol,Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Krjutskov, Kaarel
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Stockholm Count, Sweden.;Univ Helsinki, Mol Neurol Res Program, Helsinki, Finland.;Folkhalsan Inst Genet, Helsinki, Finland.;Competence Ctr Hlth Technol, Tartu, Estonia..
    Einarsdottir, Elisabet
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Stockholm Count, Sweden.;Univ Helsinki, Mol Neurol Res Program, Helsinki, Finland.;Folkhalsan Inst Genet, Helsinki, Finland..
    Grövdal, Michael
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Ctr Hematol & Regenerat Med, Dept Med Huddinge, Div Hematol,Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Jansson, Monika
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Ctr Hematol & Regenerat Med, Dept Med Huddinge, Div Hematol,Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Ben Azenkoud, Asmaa
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Ctr Hematol & Regenerat Med, Dept Med Huddinge, Div Hematol,Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Corddedu, Lina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Stockholm Count, Sweden..
    Lehmann, Sören
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Hematologi. Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Ctr Hematol & Regenerat Med, Dept Med Huddinge, Div Hematol,Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Ekwall, Karl
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Stockholm Count, Sweden..
    Kere, Juha
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Stockholm Count, Sweden.;Univ Helsinki, Mol Neurol Res Program, Helsinki, Finland.;Folkhalsan Inst Genet, Helsinki, Finland..
    Hellström-Lindberg, Eva
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Ctr Hematol & Regenerat Med, Dept Med Huddinge, Div Hematol,Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Ungerstedt, Johanna
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Ctr Hematol & Regenerat Med, Dept Med Huddinge, Div Hematol,Karolinska Inst, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Comprehensive mapping of the effects of azacitidine on DNA methylation, repressive/permissive histone marks and gene expression in primary cells from patients with MDS and MDS-related disease2017Ingår i: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, nr 17, 28812-28825 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Azacitidine (Aza) is first-line treatment for patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), although its precise mechanism of action is unknown. We performed the first study to globally evaluate the epigenetic effects of Aza on MDS bone marrow progenitor cells assessing gene expression (RNA seq), DNA methylation (Illumina 450k) and the histone modifications H3K18ac and H3K9me3 (ChIP seq). Aza induced a general increase in gene expression with 924 significantly upregulated genes but this increase showed no correlation with changes in DNA methylation or H3K18ac, and only a weak association with changes in H3K9me3. Interestingly, we observed activation of transcripts containing 15 endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) confirming previous cell line studies. DNA methylation decreased moderately in 99% of all genes, with a median beta-value reduction of 0.018; the most pronounced effects seen in heterochromatin. Aza-induced hypomethylation correlated significantly with change in H3K9me3. The pattern of H3K18ac and H3K9me3 displayed large differences between patients and healthy controls without any consistent pattern induced by Aza. We conclude that the marked induction of gene expression only partly could be explained by epigenetic changes, and propose that activation of ERVs may contribute to the clinical effects of Aza in MDS.

  • Raffield, Ben
    et al.
    Simon Fraser Univ, Human Evolutionary Studies Program, 8888 Univ Dr, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.;Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Archaeol, 8888 Univ Dr, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada..
    Price, Neil
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Historisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antik historia, Arkeologi.
    Collard, Mark
    Simon Fraser Univ, Human Evolutionary Studies Program, 8888 Univ Dr, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.;Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Archaeol, 8888 Univ Dr, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.;Univ Aberdeen, Dept Archaeol, St Marys Bldg,Elphinstone Rd, Aberdeen AB24 3UF, Scotland..
    Male-biased operational sex ratios and the Viking phenomenon: an evolutionary anthropological perspective on Late Iron Age Scandinavian raiding2017Ingår i: Evolution and human behavior, ISSN 1090-5138, E-ISSN 1879-0607, Vol. 38, nr 3, 315-324 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we use a combination of evolutionary theory, ethnographic data, written sources, and archaeological evidence to develop a new explanation for the origins of Viking raiding. Our argument focuses on the operational sex ratio, which is the ratio of males to females in a society who are ready to mate at a given time. We propose that a combination of two practices-polygyny and concubinage-and the increase in social inequality that occurred in Scandinavia during the Late Iron Age resulted in a male-biased operational sex ratio. This would have created a pool of unmarried men motivated to engage in risky behaviours that had the potential to increase their wealth and status, and therefore their probability of entering the marriage market. With high-status men looking to instigate expeditions to acquire plunder and develop their reputations as war leaders, raiding represented a mutually beneficial means of achieving social advancement and success. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • Nohr, Anne Cathrine
    et al.
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Drug Design & Pharmacol, Univ Pk 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Jespers, Willem
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Beräkningsbiologi och bioinformatik.
    Shehata, Mohamed A.
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Drug Design & Pharmacol, Univ Pk 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Floryan, Leonard
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Dept Chem & Appl Biosci, Vladimir Prelog Weg 1-5-10, CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Isberg, Vignir
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Drug Design & Pharmacol, Univ Pk 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Andersen, Kirsten Bayer
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Drug Design & Pharmacol, Univ Pk 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Åqvist, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Beräkningsbiologi och bioinformatik.
    Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för cell- och molekylärbiologi, Beräkningsbiologi och bioinformatik.
    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Drug Design & Pharmacol, Univ Pk 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Gloriam, David E.
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Drug Design & Pharmacol, Univ Pk 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    The GPR139 reference agonists 1a and 7c, and tryptophan and phenylalanine share a common binding site2017Ingår i: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, 1128Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    GPR139 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the brain, in particular in the habenula, hypothalamus and striatum. It has therefore been suggested that GPR139 is a possible target for metabolic disorders and Parkinson's disease. Several surrogate agonist series have been published for GPR139. Two series published by Shi et al. and Dvorak et al. included agonists 1a and 7c respectively, with potencies in the ten-nanomolar range. Furthermore, Isberg et al. and Liu et al. have previously shown that tryptophan (Trp) and phenylalanine (Phe) can activate GPR139 in the hundred-micromolar range. In this study, we produced a mutagenesis-guided model of the GPR139 binding site to form a foundation for future structure-based ligand optimization. Receptor mutants studied in a Ca2+ assay demonstrated that residues F109(3x33), H187(5x43), W241(6x48) and N271(7x38), but not E108(3x32), are highly important for the activation of GPR139 as predicted by the receptor model. The initial ligand-receptor complex was optimized through free energy perturbation simulations, generating a refined GPR139 model in agreement with experimental data. In summary, the GPR139 reference surrogate agonists 1a and 7c, and the endogenous amino acids L-Trp and L-Phe share a common binding site, as demonstrated by mutagenesis, ligand docking and free energy calculations.

  • Gavin, Michael C.
    et al.
    Colorado State Univ, Dept Human Dimens Nat Resources, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA.;Max Planck Inst Sci Human Hist, Jena, Germany..
    Rangel, Thiago F.
    Univ Fed Goias, Dept Ecol, Goiania, Go, Brazil..
    Bowern, Claire
    Yale Univ, Dept Linguist, New Haven, CT USA..
    Colwell, Robert K.
    Univ Connecticut, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Storrs, CT USA.;Univ Colorado, Museum Nat Hist, Boulder, CO 80309 USA..
    Kirby, Kathryn R.
    Univ Toronto, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Dept Geog & Planning, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Botero, Carlos A.
    Washington Univ, Dept Biol, Campus Box 1137, St Louis, MO 63130 USA..
    Dunn, Michael
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Språkvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för lingvistik och filologi.
    Dunn, Robert R.
    North Carolina State Univ, Dept Appl Ecol, Raleigh, NC USA..
    McCarter, Joe
    Amer Museum Nat Hist, Ctr Biodivers & Conservat, New York, NY 10024 USA..
    Coelho, Marco Tulio Pacheco
    Univ Fed Goias, Dept Ecol, Goiania, Go, Brazil..
    Gray, Russell D.
    Univ Auckland, Sch Psychol, Auckland, Australia.;Australian Natl Univ, Res Sch Social Sci, Canberra, ACT, Australia.;Max Planck Inst Sci Human Hist, Jena, Germany..
    Process-based modelling shows how climate and demography shape language diversity2017Ingår i: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 26, nr 5, 584-591 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTwo fundamental questions about human language demand answers: why are so many languages spoken today and why is their geographical distribution so uneven? Although hypotheses have been proposed for centuries, the processes that determine patterns of linguistic and cultural diversity remain poorly understood. Previous studies, which relied on correlative, curve-fitting approaches, have produced contradictory results. Here we present the first application of process-based simulation modelling, derived from macroecology, to examine the distribution of human groups and their languages. LocationThe Australian continent is used as a case study to demonstrate the power of simulation modelling for identifying processes shaping the diversity and distribution of human languages. MethodsProcess-based simulation models allow investigators to hold certain factors constant in order to isolate and assess the impact of modelled processes. We tested the extent to which a minimal set of processes determines the number and spatial distribution of languages on the Australian continent. Our model made three basic assumptions based on previously proposed, but untested, hypotheses: groups fill unoccupied spaces, rainfall limits population density and groups divide after reaching a maximum population. ResultsRemarkably, this simple model accurately predicted the total number of languages (average estimate 406, observed 407), and explained 56% of spatial variation in language richness on the Australian continent. Main conclusionsOur results present strong evidence that current climatic conditions and limits to group size are important processes shaping language diversity patterns in Australia. Our study also demonstrates how simulation models from macroecology can be used to understand the processes that have shaped human cultural diversity across the globe.

  • Loeb, Stacy
    et al.
    NYU, New York, NY USA..
    Folkvaljon, Yasin
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Alukal, Joseph
    NYU, New York, NY USA..
    Lambe, Mats
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Urologkirurgi. Umea Univ Hosp, Umea, Sweden..
    Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Risk of Favorable and Aggressive Prostate Cancer2017Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 35, nr 13, 1430-1436 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The association between exposure to testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) and prostate cancer risk is controversial. The objective was to examine this association through nationwide, population-based registry data. Methods We performed a nested case-control study in the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden, which includes all 38,570 prostate cancer cases diagnosed from 2009 to 2012, and 192,838 age-matched men free of prostate cancer. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was used to examine associations between TRT and risk of prostate cancer (overall, favorable, and aggressive). Results Two hundred eighty-four patients with prostate cancer (1%) and 1,378 control cases (1%) filled prescriptions for TRT. In multivariable analysis, no association was found between TRT and overall prostate cancer risk (odds ratio [OR], 1.03; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.17). However, patients who received TRT hadmore favorable-risk prostate cancer (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.56) and a lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.67). The increase in favorable-risk prostate cancer was already observed within the first year of TRT (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.10 to 2.34), whereas the lower risk of aggressive disease was observed after > 1 year of TRT (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.61). After adjusting for previous biopsy findings as an indicator of diagnostic activity, TRT remained significantly associated with more favorable-risk prostate cancer and lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Conclusion The early increase in favorable-risk prostate cancer among patients who received TRT suggests a detection bias, whereas the decrease in risk of aggressive prostate cancer is a novel finding that warrants further investigation. (C) 2017 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  • Collinder, Björn
    Kungl. Ortnamnskommissionen.
    Ordbok till Sveriges lapska ortnamn1964Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • Reinhammar, Maj
    Institutet för språk och folkminnen, Dialekt- och folkminnesarkivet i Uppsala (DFU).
    Nordiska dialektstudier: Föredrag vid Femte nordiska dialektologkonferensenSigtuna 17-21 augusti 19941997Proceedings (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The fifth Nordic symposium of dialectologists was attended by about 85 participants. Forty-one lectures, including two plenary lectures (by Oskar Bandle, Zürich, and Lars Huldén, Helsinki) were presented, 36 of which are published in these proceedings. They clearly display the breadth of current Nordic dialectology. The volume thus includes both articles of traditional character and of more modern direction. The contributions treat dialects and the history of language, studies of word geography, semantics, lexicography, word formation, prosody, urban speech, language contact, dialect syntax, dialect as written language, etc. The differences between dialectological and sociolinguistic spoken language research are gradually diminishing. Connections with other disciplines, such as history of science, pedagogy, and ethnology are also evident.

    From a geographic point of view, both general and more limited regional material is presented. All of the Nordic languages except Icelandic are represented, from the Faroe Islands in the west to Nyland in the east, from Fyn in the south to the northem Finnmark.

  • Recensioner2003Ingår i: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 40, nr 3, 76-91 s.Artikel, recension (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • Källskog, Margareta
    et al.
    Institutet för språk och folkminnen, Dialekt- och folkminnesarkivet i Uppsala (DFU).
    Eklund, Gerd
    Institutet för språk och folkminnen, Dialekt- och folkminnesarkivet i Uppsala (DFU).
    Danielsson, Bo
    Institutet för språk och folkminnen, Dialekt- och folkminnesarkivet i Uppsala (DFU).
    Hagren, Kristina
    Institutet för språk och folkminnen, Dialekt- och folkminnesarkivet i Uppsala (DFU).
    Westerberg, Anna
    Institutet för språk och folkminnen, Dialekt- och folkminnesarkivet i Uppsala (DFU).
    Västerlund, Rune
    Institutet för språk och folkminnen, Dialekt- och folkminnesarkivet i Uppsala (DFU).
    Reinhammar, Maj
    Institutet för språk och folkminnen, Dialekt- och folkminnesarkivet i Uppsala (DFU).
    Uppländska: Språkprov med kommentar1993Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • Lindberg, Elisabeth
    Högskolan i Kalmar.
    Att explicitgöra det implicit sagda — i självmordsnära kvinnors tal om offerskap, kön och sexualiserat våld2003Ingår i: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 40, nr 3, 57-75 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With this text I want to shed light upon the relationship between womens suicidal thoughts and acts and their experiences of sexualised violence. The main focus is set on how experiences of sexualised violence connects to patterns of victimization, and how this complicated interrelation interweave in the ways women think and act in regard to suicide. The initiating question is: “What can it mean to think of oneself in terms of victimhood when one has experiences of sexualised violence?”. My point of departure is to listen to and highlight how abused women themselves describe and interpret their suicidal acts. An analysis of how the women expresses their experiences is made, where I try to make explicit underlying (implicit) cultural notions of victims and offenders. I then search for indications on how to comprehend this silently gendered phenomena. Overall, I try to develop a frame of interpretation that can make these womens voices explicable.

  • Disputation: 2017-06-02 13:00 Kollegiesalen, Stockholm
    Daniel, Quentin
    KTH, Skolan för kemivetenskap (CHE), Kemi, Organisk kemi.
    Water oxidation: From Molecular Systems to Functional Devices2017Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The production of hydrogen gas, through the process of water splitting,is one of the most promising concepts for the production of clean andrenewable fuel.The introduction of this thesis provides a brief overview of fossil fuelsand the need for an energy transition towards clean and renewable energy.Hydrogen gas is presented as a possible candidate fuel with its productionthrough artificial photosynthesis, being described. However, the highlykinetically demanding key reaction of the process – the water oxidationreaction – requires the use of a catalyst. Hence, a short presentation of differentmolecular water oxidation catalysts previously synthesized is also provided.The second part of the thesis focuses on ruthenium-based molecularcatalysis for water oxidation. Firstly, the design and the catalytic performancefor a new series of catalysts are presented. Secondly, a further study onelectron paramagnetic resonance of a catalyst shows the coordination of awater molecule to a ruthenium centre to generate a 7-coordinated complex atRuIII state. Finally, in an electrochemical study, coupled with nuclear magneticresonance analysis, mass spectrometry and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, wedemonstrate the ability of a complex to perform an in situ dimerization of twounits in order to generate an active catalyst.The final part of this thesis focuses on immobilisation of first rowtransition metal catalysts on the surface of electrodes for electrochemical wateroxidation. Initially, a copper complex was designed and anchored on a goldsurface electrode. Water oxidation performance was studied byelectrochemistry, while deactivation of the electrode was investigated throughX-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, revealing the loss of the copper complexfrom the electrode during the reaction. Finally, we re-investigated cobaltporphyrin complexes on the surface of the electrode. Against the backgroundof previous report, we show that the decomposition of cobalt porphyrin intocobalt oxide adsorbed on the surface is responsible for the catalytic activity.This result is discussed with regard to the detection limit of various spectroscopic methods.

  • Kemeny, Jim
    Uppsala universitet.
    Korporatism och bostadsregimer2003Ingår i: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 40, nr 3, 37-56 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Housing has been described as “the wobbly pillar under the welfare state”. Unlike the other three pillars - education, health and social security - housing is largely a market commodity modified by subsidies and regulation. This makes it a potentially fruitful welfare sector to examine the interplay between market interests and policymaking. This article considers the relationship between rental housing and the welfare state interms of regime theory. Rental housing systems are divided into two types: dualist (profit rental market and residual public poor housing sector) and unitary (not-for-profit integrated into the market). Taking Esping-Andersens Three Worlds of Welfare thesis as a starting point, no Nordic social democratic regime type can be identified for housing, but in relation to classic corporatist theory, unitary rental markets are clearly associated with corporatist societies. The discussion concludes with a consideration of sector regimes in general and housing regimes in particular. It is concluded that theories of power should be more widely applied to housing, and that housing can provide an invaluable empirical laboratory for refining our understanding of both sector regimes and welfare regimes.

  • Wennerhag, Magnus
    Lunds universitet.
    Globaliseringsrörelsen — en ny social rörelse eller en klassisk konfliktdimension i nytt sammanhang?2003Ingår i: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 40, nr 3, 27-35 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • Terceti, Mateus S.
    et al.
    Rivas, Amable J.
    Alvarez, Laura
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Noia, Manuel
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Osorio, Carlos R.
    rstB Regulates Expression of the Photobacterium damselae subsp damselae Major Virulence Factors Damselysin, Phobalysin P and Phobalysin C2017Ingår i: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 8, 582Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The marine pathogenic bacterium Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae causes septicemia in marine animals and in humans. The pPHDD1 plasmid-encoded hemolysins damselysin (Dly) and phobalysin P (PhlyP), and the chromosome-encoded hemolysin phobalysin C (PhlyC) constitute its main virulence factors. However, the mechanisms by which expression of these three hemolysins is regulated remain unknown. Here we report the isolation of a mini-Tn10 transposon mutant which showed a strong impairment in its hemolytic activity. The transposon disrupted a putative sensor histidine kinase gene vda_000600 (rstB), which together with vda_000601 (rstA) is predicted to encode a putative two-component regulatory system. This system showed to be homologous to the Vibrio cholerae CarSR/VprAB and Escherichia coli RstAB systems. Reconstruction of the mutant by allelic exchange of rstB showed equal impairment in hemolysis, and complementation with a plasmid expressing rstAB restored hemolysis to wild-type levels. Remarkably, we demonstrated by promoter expression analyses that the reduced hemolysis in the rstB mutant was accompanied by a strong decrease in transcription activities of the three hemolysin genes dly (damselysin), hlyA(pl) (phobalysin P) and hlyA(ch) (phobalysin C). Thus, RstB, encoded in the small chromosome, regulates plasmid and chromosomal virulence genes. We also found that reduced expression of the three virulence genes correlated with a strong decrease in virulence in a sea bass model, demonstrating that RstB constitutes a master regulator of the three P. damselae subsp. damselae hemolysins and plays critical roles in the pathogenicity of this bacterium. This study represents the first evidence of a direct role of a RstAB-like system in the regulation of bacterial toxins.

  • Åmark, Klas
    Stockholms universitet.
    Föråldrade folkrörelser, aktiva medborgare och hetsande massmedier2003Ingår i: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 40, nr 3, 19-25 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • Brodin, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå universitet.
    En individualistisk social rörelse, är det möjligt?: Rörelsebegreppet och New Age2003Ingår i: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 40, nr 3, 11-18 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • Ahrne, Göran
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Papakostas, Apostolis
    Södertörns högskola.
    Behövs medlemmarna?2003Ingår i: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 40, nr 3, 3-10 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • Hjerm, Mikael
    Umeå universitet.
    Sociala rörelser2003Ingår i: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 40, nr 3, 2- s.Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • Patronen, Jenni
    et al.
    Kaura, Eeva
    Torvestad, Cathrine
    Nordic heating and cooling: Nordic approach to EU's Heating and Cooling Strategy2017Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the EU Commission, the heating and cooling sector must sharply reduce its energy consumption and cut its use of fossil fuel in order to meet the EU's climate and energy goals. In the Nordic countries, a lot of effort has already been put to make heat production and consumption energy efficient and to decrease the emissions. To disseminate these experiences and good practices wider in Europe, and to identify further needs for co-operation, this study attempts to identify the common approaches of the Nordic countries towards the EU’s heating and cooling strategy and Winter Package regulation. This report describes the results of the work based on Pöyry’s analysis of the current heating and cooling sector practices and regulation in the Nordic countries, and interviews of the regulators and energy industry representatives from each country.

  • Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Omvårdnad.
    Osman, Fatumo
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Omvårdnad.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Industri och samhälle, Informatik.
    Egal, Jama Ali
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Omvårdnad.
    Pedersen, Christina
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Omvårdnad.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Omvårdnad.
    Evaluation of an online master’s programme in Somaliland. A phenomenographic study on the experience of professional and personal development among midwifery faculty2017Ingår i: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    To record the variation of perceptions of midwifery faculty in terms of the possibilities and challenges related to the completion of their first online master's level programme in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in Somaliland. The informants included in this phenomenongraphical focus group study were those well-educated professional women and men who completed the master's program. The informant perceived that this first online master's level programme provided tools for independent use of the Internet and independent searching for evidence-based information, enhanced professional development, was challenge-driven and evoked curiosity, challenged professional development, enhanced personal development and challenged context-bound career paths. Online education makes it possible for well-educated professional women to continue higher education. It furthermore increased the informants' confidence in their use of Internet, software and databases and in the use of evidence in both their teaching and their clinical practice. Programmes such as the one described in this paper could counter the difficulties ensuring best practice by having a critical mass of midwives who will be able to continually gather contemporary midwifery evidence and use it to ensure best practice. An increase of online education is suggested in South-central Somalia and in similar settings globally.

  • Rondón, Raúl
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för naturvetenskap, teknik och medier, Avdelningen för informationssystem och -teknologi.
    Gidlund, Mikael
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för naturvetenskap, teknik och medier, Avdelningen för informationssystem och -teknologi.
    Landernäs, Krister
    ABB Corporate Research, Sweden.
    Evaluating Bluetooth Low Energy Suitability for Time-Critical Industrial IoT Applications2017Ingår i: International Journal of Wireless Information Networks, ISSN 1068-9605, E-ISSN 1572-8129Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, integration of wireless sensornetworks in industrial environments has greatly increased. With this trend, new fields such as industrial IoT have arisen, which in turn have opened the doors to new possibilities that are shaping the future of industrial automation. In contrast to regular wireless networks, however, industrial applications of WSN are characterized for being time-critical systems with highly stringent requirements that challenge all available technologies. Because of its ultra-low energy properties, compatibility with most mobile units, reduced production costs, robustness and hight hroughput, Bluetooth low energy (BLE) is a potential candidate for these settings. This article explores thepotential of BLE of meeting the real-time demands foundin the domain of industrial process automation and industrial IoT. In order to evaluate the suitability of the protocol for these scenarios, the effect of adaptations in the retransmission scheme on the reliability and timeliness performance are thoroughly studied. Three retransmission schemes are evaluated and simulation results proved that by optimally modifying the BLE retransmission model, a maximum delay below 46 ms and a packet loss rate in the order of 105 can be obtained, enabling BLE to fulfill the requirements of even the most demanding cases within the considered range of applications.

  • Skär, Lisa
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Omvårdnad.
    Barn och ungdomar med rörelsehinder: deras uppfattningar om roller, relationer och aktiviteter2002Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The general aim of this thesis was to describe how children and adolescents with restricted mobility perceived their roles, relations and activities in relation to peers and adults in different settings. The thesis includes six sub-studies, which are based on interviews, observations and field notes with children and adolescents with restricted mobility aged from 6 to 19 years. Using Bronfenbrenner’s theory “the Ecology of Human Development” as the main theoretical framework, the ambition was to understand the children and adolescents’ social world from their perspective. The principal finding was the lack of peers in the children and adolescents’ social network. Furthermore, this tendency of isolation from peers was found to increase during the transition from childhood to adolescence. Their relationships to peers were strained and activities and surroundings in which social contacts could develop were limited. The relationships with peers were also characterised by social barriers in the form of attitudes that resulted in social isolation from the group of persons the disabled children and adolescents most wished to be with. When relations to peers were limited, the disabled children’s social life was restricted to adults. The results further showed that the children and adolescents’ roles and relations often were significantly different from their peers. The children and adolescents’ arrived at a concept of themselves that differed from the way others conceptually saw them. Furthermore, the children and adolescents saw themselves as regular members of their peer group, but the other members of the peer group saw them as different from themselves. Relationships to friends of the same age either were confined or were nonexistent. Relationships to adults were often characterised as ambivalent or asymmetric, i.e. the adults were helpful and supportive while over protective and dominant at the same time. The thesis revealed that, despite the many obstacles facing them, the children and adolescents with restricted mobility had a positive view of their future.

  • Niska, Anna
    et al.
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Infrastruktur, INFRA, Drift och underhåll, DOU.
    Wenäll, Jan
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut, Infrastruktur, INFRA, Krocksäkerhet, KRO.
    Cykelfaktorer som påverkar huvudskador: simulerade omkullkörningar med cykel i VTI:s krocksäkerhetslaboratorium2017Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    I det här projektet har omkullkörningar med cykel simulerats i VTI:s krocksäkerhetslaboratorium. Kraschtester med cyklar har tidigare endast genomförts i mycket begränsad omfattning och då har framförallt kollision med bil studerats, samtidigt som flertalet studier visat att cyklister i huvudsak skadas i singelolyckor. Syftet med den här studien har varit att undersöka hur cykelns utformning och hastighet påverkar skadeutfallet vid en singelolycka samt att se om det är möjligt att studera detta med hjälp av kraschtester. För att undersöka det, har två olycksscenarier simulerats: ”plötsligt stopp” och ”undanstyrning av framhjul”; med fyra olika typer av cyklar: damcykel, pendlarcykel, liggcykel och elcykel; i två olika hastigheter: 15 och 25 kilometer i timmen. Dessutom har falltester gjort med stillastående cykel. Försöken har genomförts med en HYB II 50 percentil vuxendocka placerad på cyklarna, med accelerationsmätning i dockans huvud.

  • Liljekvist, Yvonne
    et al.
    Mellroth, Elisabet
    Olsson, Jan
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Matematikdidaktik. Umeå universitet.
    Boesen, Jesper
    Conceptualizing a local instruction theory in design research: report from a symposium2017Ingår i: ICT in mathematics education: the future and the realities. Proceedings of MADIF10. The tenth research seminar of the Swedish Society for Research in Mathematics Education. Karlstad, January 26–27, 2016 / [ed] Johan Häggström, Eva Norén, Jorryt van Bommel, Judy Sayers, Ola Helenius, Yvonne Liljekvist, Göteborg: SMDF/NCM , 2017, 119-128 s.Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • Björk, Annette
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Avdelningen för hälsovetenskap.
    Rönngren, Ylva
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Selander, John
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Avdelningen för hälsovetenskap.
    Vinberg, Stig
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Avdelningen för hälsovetenskap.
    Hellzen, Ove
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Perspectives on Everyday Suffering among People with Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Concurrent Mental Disorders2017Ingår i: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 7, 583-598 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the perceptions of everyday suffering among adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comorbid mental disease. Directed content analysis guided by Eriksson’s theory on human suffering was performed on data from 20 individual interviews. Expressions of both suffering and well-being were identified; the former centred on loneliness and related to life, illness, and care, which supported Eriksson’s theory, whereas expressions of well-being related to ADHD diagnosis and supportive social relationships. Nevertheless, results indicate the need to expand those expressions in order to better contribute to developing a supportive rehabilitation regimen that can provide more interpersonal care.

  • Lundberg, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teologiska fakulteten, Teologiska institutionen, Kyrko- och missionsstudier, Missionsvetenskap. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teologiska fakulteten, Teologiska institutionen, Kyrko- och missionsstudier, Kyrkohistoria.
    A Pope of their Own: El Palmar de Troya and the Palmarian Church2017Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2018, fifty years will have passed since the first reports of Marian apparitions in El Palmar de Troya in Spanish Andalusia. It will also be the fortieth anniversary of the coronation of the seer Clemente Domínguez Gómez as Pope Gregory XVII, and the consequent foundation of the Palmarian Catholic Church. Still, placing the papal tiara on his head was only seen as a human act of confirmation. He asserted that Christ himself had crowned him just after the death of Pope Paul VI.

    This book provides a broad overview of the history of the apparitions at El Palmar de Troya and the church that became its main result. It also includes a more systematic analysis of the church’s increasingly unusual doctrines and rituals. Through the study, I try to answer two underlying questions: First, which factors contributed to the foundation of the Palmarian Church?  Second, how has the church survived and developed through its four decades of existence?

  • Backstrom, Tobias
    et al.
    Heynen, Martina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Brannas, Eva
    Nilsson, Jan
    Winberg, Svante
    Magnhagen, Carin
    Anaesthesia and handling stress effects on pigmentation and monoamines in Arctic charr2017Ingår i: Environmental Biology of Fishes, ISSN 0378-1909, E-ISSN 1573-5133, Vol. 100, nr 5, 471-480 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress responsiveness differs between individuals and is often categorized into different stress coping styles. Using these stress coping styles for selection in fish farming could be beneficial, since stress is one main factor affecting welfare. In Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) carotenoid pigmentation is associated with stress responsiveness and stress coping styles. Thus this could be an important tool to use for selection of stress resilient charr. However, anaesthetics seem to affect carotenoid pigmentation, and it would be better if the method for selection could be implemented during normal maintenance, which usually includes anaesthetics. Therefore, this study investigated how the use of anaesthetics affected carotenoid pigmentation, i.e. number of spots, over time compared to no-anaesthetic treatment. Additionally, the stress indicators monoamines and glucocorticoids were investigated. The results indicate that the anaesthetic MS-222 affects number of spots on the right side. This anaesthetic also increased dopaminergic activity in the telencephalon. Both brain dopaminergic and serotonergic activity was associated with spottiness. Further, behaviour during anaesthetization was associated with spots on the left side, but not the right side. Repetition of the same treatment seemed to affect spot numbers on the right side. In conclusion, this study shows that inducing stress in charr affects the carotenoid spots. Thus, it is possible to use anaesthetics when evaluating spottiness although careful planning is needed.

  • Bertelsen, R. J.
    et al.
    Rava, M.
    Carsin, A. E.
    Accordini, S.
    Benediktsdottir, B.
    Dratva, J.
    Franklin, Karl A.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Kirurgi.
    Heinrich, J.
    Holm, M.
    Janson, C.
    Johannessen, A.
    Jarvis, D. L.
    Jogi, R.
    Leynaert, B.
    Norback, D.
    Omenaas, E. R.
    Raherison, C.
    Sanchez-Ramos, J. L.
    Schlunssen, V.
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Dharmage, S. C.
    Svanes, C.
    Clinical markers of asthma and IgE assessed in parents before conception predict asthma and hayfever in the offspring2017Ingår i: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 47, nr 5, 627-638 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mice models suggest epigenetic inheritance induced by parental allergic disease activity. However, we know little of how parental disease activity before conception influences offspring's asthma and allergy in humans.

    Objective: We aimed to assess the associations of parental asthma severity, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), and total and specific IgEs, measured before conception vs. after birth, with offspring asthma and hayfever.

    Methods: The study included 4293 participants (mean age 34, 47% men) from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) with information on asthma symptom severity, BHR, total and specific IgEs from 1991 to 1993, and data on 9100 offspring born 1972–2012. Adjusted relative risk ratios (aRRR) for associations of parental clinical outcome with offspring allergic disease were estimated with multinomial logistic regressions.

    Results: Offspring asthma with hayfever was more strongly associated with parental BHR and specific IgE measured before conception than after birth [BHR: aRRR = 2.96 (95% CI: 1.92, 4.57) and 1.40 (1.03, 1.91), respectively; specific IgEs: 3.08 (2.13, 4.45) and 1.83 (1.45, 2.31), respectively]. This was confirmed in a sensitivity analysis of a subgroup of offspring aged 11–22 years with information on parental disease activity both before and after birth.

    Conclusion & Clinical Relevance: Parental BHR and specific IgE were associated with offspring asthma and hayfever, with the strongest associations observed with clinical assessment before conception as compared to after birth of the child. If the hypothesis is confirmed in other studies, parental disease activity assessed before conception may prove useful for identifying children at risk for developing asthma with hayfever.

  • Eksell, Kertin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för Asien-, Mellanöstern- och Turkietstudier, Avdelningen för mellanösternstudier.
    Efterord: Washington Irving2016Ingår i: Berättelser från Alhambra, Alhambra , 2016, 1, 224-231 s.Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • Al Adhami, Maissa
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Socialmedicin.
    Utvärdering av pilotfasen i “Välkommen till Skåne”: Delprojekt 4, MILSA 2.02017Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • Fornander, Louise
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin.
    Upper Airway Mucosal Inflammation: Proteomic Studies after Exposure to Irritants and Microbial Agents2015Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    People are, in their daily lives, exposed to a number of airborne foreign compounds that do not normally affect the body. However, depending on the nature of these compounds, dose and duration of exposure, various airway symptoms may arise. Early symptoms are often manifested as upper airway mucosal inflammation which generates changes in protein composition in the airway lining fluid.

    This thesis aims at identifying, understanding mechanisms and characterizing protein alterations in the upper airway mucosa that can be used as potential new biomarkers for inflammation in the mucosa. The protein composition in the mucosa was studied by sampling of nasal lavage fluid that was further analyzed with a proteomic approach using twodimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Additionally, by studying factors on site through environmental examination, health questionnaires and biological analyses, we have tried to understand the background to these protein alterations and their impact on health.

    Respiratory symptoms from the upper airways are common among people who are exposed to irritative and microbial agents. This thesis have focused on personnel in swimming pool facilities exposed to trichloramine, metal industry workers exposed to metalworking fluids, employees working in damp and moldy buildings and infants diagnosed with respiratory syncytial virus infection. The common denominator in these four studies is that the subjects experience upper airway mucosal inflammation, which is manifested as cough, rhinitis, phlegm etc. In the three occupational studies, the symptoms were work related. Notably, a high prevalence of perceived mucosal symptoms was shown despite the relatively low levels of airborne irritants revealed by the environmental examination. Protein profiling verified an ongoing inflammatory response by identification of several proteins that displayed altered levels. Interestingly, innate immune proteins dominated and four protein alterations occurred in most of the studies; SPLUNC1, protein S100A8 and S100A9 and alpha-1-antitrypsin. Similarly, these proteins were also found in nasal fluid from children with virus infection and in addition a truncated form of SPLUNC1 and two other S100 proteins (S100A7-like 2 and S100A16), not previously found in nasal secretion, were identified.

    Altogether, the results indicate the potential use of a proteomic approach for identifying new biomarkers for the upper respiratory tract at an early stage in the disease process after exposure to irritant and microbial agents. The results indicate an effect on the innate immunity system and the proteins; SPLUNC1, protein S100A8 and S100A9 and alpha-1-antitrypsin are especially promising new biomarkers. Moreover, further studies of these proteins may help us to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in irritant-induced airway inflammation.

  • Rask, Peter
    Umeå universitet, Klinisk fysiologi, Umeå, Sweden.
    Aortic stenosis: diagnostic use and hemodynamic effects of dipyridamole1995Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • Szabo, Eva
    Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Molecular and clinical genetic studies of a novel variant of familial hypercalcemia2002Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Familial primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) is a rare disorder that is treated surgically and mostly occurs in association with tumor-susceptibility syndromes, like multiple endocrine neoplasia and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome. Familial hypercalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is another cause of hereditary hypercalcemia that generally is considered to require no treatment and is genetically and pathophysiologically distinct from HPT. Inactivating mutations in the calcium receptor gene cause FHH, whereas the down-regulated expression of the CaR in HPT never has been coupled to CaR gene mutations.

    Family screening revealed a hitherto unknown familial condition with characteristics of both FHH and HPT. The hypercalcemia was mapped to a point mutation in the intracellular domain of the CaR gene that was coupled to relative calcium resistance of the PTH release by transient expression in HEK 294 cells. Unusually radical excision of parathyroid glands was required to normalise the hypercalcemia. The mildly enlarged parathyroid glands displayed hyperplasia with nodular components. Frequent allelic loss on especially 12q was found and contrasts to findings in HPT. Allelic loss was also seen in loci typical for primary HPT like 1p, 6q and 15q, but not 11q13. Quantitative mRNA analysis showed that the glands had mild increase in a proliferation index (PCNA/GAPDH mRNA ratio) and mild reduction in genes important to parathyroid cell function, like CaR, PTH, VDR and LRP2.

    A previously unrecognized variant of hypercalcemia is explored that could be one explanation for persistent hypercalcemia after apparently typical routine operations for HPT. It also raises the issue of possibilities to treat FHH with parathyroidectomy provided it is radical enough.