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  • Public defence: 2019-05-17 10:00 B1014, Jönköping
    Duras, Toni
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Statistics.
    Applications of common principal components in multivariate and high-dimensional analysis2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis consists of four papers, all exploring some aspect of common principal component analysis (CPCA), the generalization of PCA to multiple groups. The basic assumption of the CPC model is that the space spanned by the eigenvectors is identical across several groups, whereas eigenvalues associated with the eigenvectors can vary. CPCA is used in essentially the same areas and applications as PCA.

    The first paper compares the performance of the maximum likelihood and Krzanowski’s estimators of the CPC model for two real-world datasets and in a Monte Carlo simulation study. The simplicity and intuition of Krzanowski's estimator and the findings in this paper support and promote the use of this estimator for CPC models over the maximum likelihood estimator.

    Paper number two uses CPCA as a tool for imposing restrictions on system-wise regression models. The paper contributes to the field by proposing a variety of explicit estimators, deriving their properties and identifying the appropriate amount of smoothing that should be imposed on the estimator. 

    In the third paper, a generalization of the fixed effects PCA model to multiple populations in a CPC environment is proposed. The model includes mainly geometrical, rather than probabilistic, assumptions, and is designed to account for any possible prior information about the noise in the data to yield better estimates, obtained by minimizing a least squares criterion with respect to a specified metric.

    The fourth paper survey some properties of the orthogonal group and the associated Haar measure on it. It is demonstrated how seemingly abstract results contribute to applied statistics and, in particular, to PCA.

  • Rolandsdotter, Helena
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sodersjukhuset, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, S-11883 Stockholm, Sweden;Soder Sjukhuset, Sachs Children & Youth Hosp, Dept Gastroenterol, S-11883 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jönsson-Videsäter, Kerstin
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, S-14157 Huddinge, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, S-14157 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Fagerberg, Ulrika L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Finkel, Yigael
    Karolinska Inst, Sodersjukhuset, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, S-11883 Stockholm, Sweden;Soder Sjukhuset, Sachs Children & Youth Hosp, Dept Gastroenterol, S-11883 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eberhardson, Michael
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Gastroenterol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Exclusive Enteral Nutrition: Clinical Effects and Changes in Mucosal Cytokine Profile in Pediatric New Inflammatory Bowel Disease2019In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 2, article id 414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exclusive Enteral Nutrition (EEN) is the first-line treatment in children with Crohn's disease (CD) for induction of remission. However, the mode of action remains conjectural. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the effect of EEN is paralleled by changes in the mucosal cytokine profiles (MCP). Twelve children with new onset inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) received induction treatment with a polymeric EEN. We assessed clinical, endoscopic and histologic scoring before and after EEN. Twelve colonic cytokines were analyzed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in six of the IBD patients at onset and after EEN as well as in six non-IBD control children at the diagnostic colonoscopy. Twelve children completed 6 weeks of EEN, except from one child who completed 4 weeks. At the control colonoscopy, 83% were in complete clinical remission. Changes were found in the MCPs of individual patients after EEN. In particular, children with IBD showed significantly higher values of Interleukin (IL)-12 (p = 0.008) and IL-23 (p = 0.02) compared to non-IBD controls at the diagnostic colonoscopy. Furthermore, an overall change in proinflammatory cytokines was noted in the IBD-group after treatment. Further studies are warranted to understand the role of EEN in MCP.

  • Toxopeus, Eelke L. A.
    et al.
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Surg, Doctor Molewaterpl 40, NL-3015 GD Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    de Man, Femke M.
    Erasmus Univ, Erasmus Med Ctr, Med Ctr, Canc Inst,Dept Med Oncol, Doctor Molewaterpl 40, NL-3015 GD Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Krak, Nanda
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Radiol, Doctor Molewaterpl 40, NL-3015 GD Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Biermann, Katharina
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Pathol, Doctor Molewaterpl 40, NL-3015 GD Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Nieuweboer, Annemieke J. M.
    Erasmus Univ, Erasmus Med Ctr, Med Ctr, Canc Inst,Dept Med Oncol, Doctor Molewaterpl 40, NL-3015 GD Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Friberg, Lena E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Oomen-de Hoop, Esther
    Erasmus Univ, Erasmus Med Ctr, Med Ctr, Canc Inst,Dept Med Oncol, Doctor Molewaterpl 40, NL-3015 GD Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    van Lanschot, Jan J. B.
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Surg, Doctor Molewaterpl 40, NL-3015 GD Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Shapiro, Joel
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Surg, Doctor Molewaterpl 40, NL-3015 GD Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Wijnhoven, Bas P. L.
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Surg, Doctor Molewaterpl 40, NL-3015 GD Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Mathijssen, Ron H. J.
    Erasmus Univ, Erasmus Med Ctr, Med Ctr, Canc Inst,Dept Med Oncol, Doctor Molewaterpl 40, NL-3015 GD Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Association between Paclitaxel Clearance and Tumor Response in Patients with Esophageal Cancer2019In: Cancers, ISSN 2072-6694, Vol. 11, no 2, article id 173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inter-individual variability in paclitaxel pharmacokinetics may play a role in the response to chemotherapy. Therefore, we studied the association between paclitaxel clearance and treatment response in patients with esophageal cancer. All patients who received paclitaxel (plus carboplatin) treatment for esophageal cancer between 2007 and 2013 were included. The treatment was given as neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT), induction chemotherapy (iCT), or palliative chemotherapy (pCT). The treatment response was assessed by the tumor regression grade (TRG) or by the RECIST1.1 criteria, respectively. The unbound paclitaxel clearance (CL) was estimated with NONMEM. The log-transformed clearance was related to response with ANOVA and independent sample t-tests. A total of 166 patients were included, of whom 113 received nCRT, 23 iCT and 30 pCT. In patients receiving nCRT, paclitaxel clearance was not associated with tumor regression grade (p-value = 0.25), nor with pathologically complete response (geometric mean 561.6 L/h) and residual disease (geometric mean 566.1 L/h, p-value = 0.90). In patients who underwent iCT or pCT, also no association between paclitaxel clearance and RECIST outcome was identified (iCT: p-value = 0.08 and pCT: p-value = 0.81, respectively). In conclusion, systemic paclitaxel exposure was not associated with response to common paclitaxel-based treatment regimens for esophageal cancer. Future studies should focus on tumor exposure in relation to systemic exposure and treatment outcome.

  • Lundåsen, Susanne
    Ersta Sköndal högskola, Enheten för forskning om det civila samhället.
    Frivilliga insatser och hälsa2005Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I den genomförda undersökningen har samband mellan hälsa och frivilligt arbete kunnat konstateras. Det är dock, som alltid, svårt att utröna riktningen på sambanden med tvärsnittsstudier. Den teoretiska förklaringen till sambandet mellan frivilliga insatser och hälsa skulle i detta fall gå via det sociala kapitalet som antas vara större hos dem som arbetar frivilligt eller har tillgång till andra typer av informella ideellt baserade nätverk, och att det sociala kapitalet i sin tur påverkar hälsan positivt. De som är frivilligt aktiva har i den genomförda studien i genomsnitt bättre hälsa än de som inte är frivilligt aktiva. Skillnaderna i självskattad hälsa mellan frivilligt aktiva och icke aktiva kan inte förklaras enbart med socioekonomiska skillnader, eftersom frivilligt arbete kvarstår som signifikant i en regressionsmodell där även socioekonomiska faktorer ingår. Andra faktorer som kan kopplas till socialt kapital (såsom tillit) har också en statistiskt signifikant och positiv effekt på den självskattade hälsan. Men bilden av skillnaderna mellan frivilligt aktiva och icke frivilligt aktiva blir något mer komplex om man delar upp dem i mindre grupper.

    Inom gruppen frivilligt aktiva finns det skillnader, där bland andra äldre aktiva har större positiva skillnader i självskattad hälsa än vad yngre har. Bland de yngre finns det inga statistiskt signifikanta skillnader i självskattad hälsa mellan aktiva och icke aktiva. Det finns större hälsoskillnader mellan frivilligt arbetande och icke frivilligt arbetande kvinnor än mellan frivilligt arbetande och icke frivilligt arbetande män. De frivilligt aktiva kvinnorna har i genomsnitt mindre värk i axlar, nacke, rygg, händer, armbågar, ben och knän, medan de frivilligt aktiva männen i vissa fall har mer besvär än vad de icke frivilligt aktiva männen har. En stor del av den generella hälsoskillnaden mellan dem som arbetar frivilligt och dem som inte gör det skulle kunna härledas till de frivilligt arbetande kvinnornas bättre hälsa. Dessa kvinnor har en markant högre utbildningsnivå än de kvinnor som inte arbetar frivilligt, och den är även markant högre än vad genomsnittet bland de frivilligt arbetande männen är. Den högre utbildningsnivån skulle delvis kunna förklara hälsoskillnaderna mellan de frivilligt arbetande kvinnorna och de frivilligt arbetande männen.

    De som är frivilligt aktiva är ofta även aktiva på andra plan, exempelvis genom informella hjälpinsatser för vänner och släktingar som är mer eller mindre omfattande. Även här finns det könsskillnader – kvinnor lägger i genomsnitt ned betydligt mer tid på informellt hjälparbete än vad männen gör. Det finns dock undantag: bland dem som gör betydande informella hjälpinsatser är det vissa som har en sämre hälsa än de övriga aktiva. De som gör de allra största informella hjälpinsatserna, i detta fall för personer med särskilda omsorgsbehov i det egna hushållet, har en i genomsnitt väsentligt sämre självskattad hälsa än de övriga. Denna grupp har antagligen också en mer begränsad möjlighet att engagera sig i aktiviteter utanför det egna hushållet.

    Studien har även berört deltagandet i ideellt baserade nätverk och finner att den självskattade hälsan och den psykiska hälsan i genomsnitt är bättre hos dem som deltar i flertalet ideellt baserade nätverk.

    Teorierna om det sociala kapitalets betydelse finner delvis stöd i denna studie då sambanden mellan de olika formerna av frivilliga insatser och hälsan generellt sett är positiva, vilket var det som hypotetiskt kunde förväntas. Orsakerna till att människor står utanför det organiserade frivilliga arbetet och andra typer av ideella nätverk är antagligen många och de olika faktorernas betydelse för hälsan torde kunna utgöra föremål för en annan studie.

  • Mantas, Athanasios
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Labbe, Valentine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Loryan, Irena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Amorphisation of Free Acid Ibuprofen and Other Profens in Mixtures with Nanocellulose: Dry Powder Formulation Strategy for Enhanced Solubility2019In: Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1999-4923, E-ISSN 1999-4923, Vol. 11, no 2, article id 68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formulation of arylpropionic acid derivatives (profens), which are poorly soluble Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) Type II drugs, has a strong impact on their therapeutic action. This article shows that heat-treated powder mixtures of free acid profens with high surface area Cladophora cellulose induces drug amorphization and results in enhanced solubility and bioavailability. Similar mixtures produced using conventional low surface area cellulose, i.e., microcrystalline cellulose, does not produce the same effect. The concept is thoroughly described and links the solid-state characterization data, such as differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier-transform infra-red spectroscopy, with in vitro dissolution in biorelevant media and in vivo pharmacokinetic analysis in rats. The concept is demonstrated for several substances from the profens group, including ibuprofen (main model drug), ketoprofen, flurbiprofen, and naproxen. The presented approach opens new ways to produce solid dosage forms of profen drugs in their free acidic form as alternatives to existing analogues, e.g., drug-salt conjugates or soft gel liquid capsules.

  • Weber, Megan
    et al.
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Dept Caring Sci, Palliat Res Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Dept Caring Sci, Palliat Res Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden;Dalen Hosp, Capio Palliat Care, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Dept Caring Sci, Palliat Res Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Women & Childs Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Dept Caring Sci, Palliat Res Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Communication in families with minor children following the loss of a parent to cancer2019In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 39, p. 41-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    Family communication is a known protective factor for minor children's psychological health following the death of a parent, but there is little research describing communication within such families specifically from the perspective of the children. The purpose of this study was therefore to explore communication in parentally bereaved families from the perspective of the children and surviving parent.

    Methods:

    Interviews with four parents and four children from four families were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Interviews took place in the family's home or at the research center based on the family's wishes 4-14 months after a parent had died. Interviews had an open approach and were based on an interview guide. Each interview was between 60 and 120 min long.

    Results:

    Four categories emerged which were related to family members' experiences of family communication while adjusting to their new circumstances as bereaved: the importance of open and honest communication in the family; new challenges in the family which affect communication; communicating the need for help; and talking about and remembering the deceased parent.

    Conclusions:

    This study illuminates the connection between family communication and adjustments to new circumstances following the death of a parent. The results suggest that the relationship between family adjustment and communication may be circular whereby the family's ability to adjust to their new circumstances is affected by how the family communicates. Similarly, family communication may be affected by the family's coping strategies and ability to adjust to their new circumstances.

  • Ramnarine, Timothy J. S.
    et al.
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Fac Biol, Div Evolutionary Biol, Grosshaderner Str 2, D-82152 Planegg Martinsried, Germany.
    Glaser-Schmitt, Amanda
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Fac Biol, Div Evolutionary Biol, Grosshaderner Str 2, D-82152 Planegg Martinsried, Germany.
    Catalan, Ana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Fac Biol, Div Evolutionary Biol, Grosshaderner Str 2, D-82152 Planegg Martinsried, Germany.
    Parsch, John
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Fac Biol, Div Evolutionary Biol, Grosshaderner Str 2, D-82152 Planegg Martinsried, Germany.
    Population Genetic and Functional Analysis of a cis-Regulatory Polymorphism in the Drosophila melanogaster Metallothionein A gene2019In: Genes, ISSN 2073-4425, E-ISSN 2073-4425, Vol. 10, no 2, article id 147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although gene expression can vary extensively within and among populations, the genetic basis of this variation and the evolutionary forces that maintain it are largely unknown. In Drosophila melanogaster, a 49-bp insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphism in the Metallothionein A (MtnA) gene is associated with variation in MtnA expression and oxidative stress tolerance. To better understand the functional and evolutionary significance of this polymorphism, we investigated it in several worldwide populations. In a German population, the deletion was present at a high and stable frequency over multiple seasons and years, and was associated with increased MtnA expression. There was, however, no evidence that the polymorphism was maintained by overdominant, seasonally fluctuating, or sexually antagonistic selection. The deletion was rare in a population from the species' ancestral range in sub-Saharan Africa and is likely the result of non-African admixture, suggesting that it spread to high frequency following the species' out-of-Africa expansion. Using data from a North American population, we found that the deletion was associated with MtnA expression and tolerance to oxidative stress induced by menadione sodium bisulfite. Our results are consistent with the deletion being selectively favored in temperate populations due to the increased MtnA expression and oxidative stress tolerance that it confers.

  • Lundåsen, Susanne
    Mid Sweden University College, Sweden / Åbo Akademi University, Finlândia.
    Podemos confiar nas medidas de cofianca? [Can we trust the measurement of trust?]2002In: Opinião Pública, ISSN 0104-6276, E-ISSN 1807-0191, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 304-327Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The variable trust has become widely used in the social science research lately and few concepts seem to have attracted so much attention from such a broad variety of academic disciplines. In political science in the theories on social capital and political culture, emphasizing its importance for democracy, trus has been seen as na essential variable for the understanding of societies. In social capital theory the generalized interpersonal trust is often given a particularly important role to initiate virtuous circles of development in the societies. This paper will treat some of the different theories that are connected both to the definition and the effects of generalized trust and then issues connected to the uncertainty of the measurements of generalized trust.

  • Blom, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    Dekhla, Isabelle
    Schöld, Sofie
    SMHI, Core Services.
    Andersson, Mathias H.
    Svensson, Ola
    Amorim, M. Clara P.
    Continuous but not intermittent noise has a negative impact on mating success in a marine fish with paternal care2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 5494Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Tanouchi, Hiroto
    et al.
    Olsson, Jonas
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Lindström, Göran
    SMHI, Research Department, Hydrology.
    Kawamura, Akira
    Amaguchi, Hideo
    Improving Urban Runoff in Multi-Basin Hydrological Simulation by the HYPE Model Using EEA Urban Atlas: A Case Study in the Sege River Basin, Sweden2019In: HYDROLOGY, ISSN 2306-5338, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Robelin, Roger de
    Gustav III:s barndom och leksaker1991In: Lekar för livet, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1991, p. 86-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Public defence: 2019-06-05 13:00 Forum Humanum, Jönköping
    Rundqvist, Louise
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. Biomedical Platform.
    Aspects of regular long-term endurance exercise in adolescents, with focus on cardiac size and function, hormones, and the immune system2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The long-term effects of starting high-intensity training at younger ages are largely unknown. The present studies focused on adolescents who had performed regular endurance exercise for several years at an elite level and compared those subjects with a control group of adolescents of similar age and sex who had not engaged in regular exercise. The knowledges generated by this research will contribute to further understanding of some of the physiological effects of strenuous regular exercise during adolescence.

    Aim: The overall aim of this research was to investigate endurance-trained adolescents, focusing on cardiac size and function, hormones associated with growth and metabolism, and impact on the immune system.

    Methods: All participants underwent echocardiography at rest as well as immediately and 15 minutes after amaximal cardiopulmonary exercise test. Blood samples were taken at rest and analyzed for biomarkers such as hormones, immune cell surface markers, and secreted cytokines and chemokines. The study design was crosssectional (Papers I, III, and IV) and comparative, with a quantitative approach in all four studies. The evaluationin Paper II used a pre-post test design with measurements of cardiac parameters before and after a maximal treadmill test. The studies in Papers I–III compared endurance-trained (active group) and untrained (controls) adolescents matched by age and sex, whereas the analysis in Paper IV considered differences between the sexes in the endurance-trained adolescents.

    Results: Compared with controls, the endurance-trained adolescents showed increased size of all four heart chambers, as well as improved cardiac systolic function at rest. Considering cardiac changes from baseline to immediately after exercise, the systolic and diastolic patterns were similar in both groups, although the diastolic function was more enhanced in the active group. Strong associations between peak oxygen uptake and cardiac size and function could be seen both at rest and after exercise. Circulating hormones at rest did not differ between the two groups. No correlation between insulin-like growth factor 1 and cardiac size was found among the endurance-trained adolescents. Compared with endurance-trained girls, endurance-trained boys exhibited an elevated response to a potent type 1 diabetes-related autoantigen. Conversely, compared with the trained boys, the trained girls showed an increased number of circulating immune cells and increased secretion of C-peptide and proinsulin.

    Conclusions: There are many benefits associated with regular exercise, and the present research did not provide any data to oppose that statement. Factors such as increased cardiac size at rest and exercise-related effects on cardiac functions do occur and therefore should be expected in endurance-trained adolescents with high peak oxygen uptake. Indeed, this should be interpreted as a sign of physiological adaptation and not as pathophysiology. The greater cardiac dimensions observed in these subjects could not be related to increased resting levels of hormones associated with growth and metabolism. The endurance-trained adolescents did show some sex-related differences with regard to their immune response at rest.

  • Almqvist, Birgitta
    Lek och leksaker förr och nu1991In: Leka för livet, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1991, p. 58-85Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Public defence: 2019-05-17 10:00 Air & Fire auditorium, Science for Life Laboratory, Solna
    Cengic, Ivana
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Synthetic biology approaches for improving production of fatty acid-derived compounds in cyanobacteria2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental consequences associated with the use of fossil-sourced fuels and chemicals have brought with it a realization that future development must move in a more sustainable direction. Currently available biofuels or renewably produced chemical, such as bioethanol or biodiesel, are produced from microbial fermentation of sugar-rich crops or by chemical conversion of natural oils or fats. However, these strategies are not sustainable in the long run as fuel and chemical production competes with food supply and arable land usage. Instead of relying on photosynthetic feedstocks that require further conversion, one can engineer photosynthetic cyanobacteria to produce a product of interest directly from CO2 and sunlight. The first part of this thesis aimed to develop new synthetic biology tools for the model cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The second part of the thesis focused on evaluating the regulation of fatty acid synthesis in cyanobacteria, and the production of fatty acid-derived chemicals in Synechocystis.

    In paper I, fusion of small affinity proteins (Affibodies) to the major type IV pili protein was shown to mediate successful surface display of the affibody. This surface display strategy was further shown to allow inter-species binding between Synechocystis and Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus carnosus displaying complementary polymerizing affibodies.

    In paper II, a CRISPR-interference tool was successfully implemented in Synechocystis for inducible gene repression. Further, its multiplexing ability was proven by simultaneous repression of up to four aldehyde reductase/dehydrogenase genes. In paper III, this established CRISPRi tool was used to target and repress native pathways competing with heterologous fatty alcohol production in Synechocystis. Repressing the gene encoding the PlsX phosphate acyltransferase allowed re-direction of carbon-flux from membrane lipids to fatty alcohol production, with a final best strain producing 10.4 mg g-1 DCW octadecanol and hexadecanol.

    In paper IV, the transcriptional response towards perturbations within the fatty acid synthesis pathway was evaluated for the two model cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Preliminary results indicate that blocking fatty acid synthesis initiation/elongation causes a transcriptional response of the involved pathway genes only in S. elongatus PCC 7942, indicating differential transcriptional responses in these two strains.

    In paper V, metagenomically sourced aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (Ado) variants were evaluated for their alka(e)ne synthesizing ability. Several of these novel Ado enzymes outperformed the generally well-performing Ado from S. elongatus when relating alka(e)ne production to the soluble enzyme amount.

  • Roe, Daniel
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Hugo, Martin
    Jönköping University.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    'Rings on the water': examining the pedagogical approach at a football program for detained youth in Sweden.2019In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 919-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies indicate that sport within youth institutional settings can be beneficial (e.g. learning social skills) or problematic (e.g. social exclusion) depending on how they are structured, delivered and, ultimately, experienced by students. In this article, we examine the experiences of students and staff in an educational sport program at a Swedish all-male youth detention home (ages 16–20) in order to increase understanding of the pedagogical approach of a sports-based program for detained youth. Drawing on interviews with both students and staff, we identify and elaborate four aspects of the program—building a pedagogical platform, 'seeing' and meeting students, creating a supportive environment, and thinking beyond the institution—that were collectively represented to initiate and guide a process of growth and change for students. We discuss how these aspects of the program's pedagogical approach, in contrast to deficiency-based approaches, can provide a useful framework for delivering sport in ways that can benefit detained youth and other young people in socially vulnerable situations. ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR

  • De Man, Jeroen
    et al.
    Inst Trop Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Antwerp, Belgium;Univ Antwerp, Dept Primary & Interdisciplinary Care, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Aweko, Juliet
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Daivadanam, Meena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics. Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alvesson, Helle Molsted
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Delobelle, Peter
    Univ Western Cape, Sch Publ Hlth, Bellville, South Africa;Univ Cape Town, Chron Dis Initiat Africa, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Mayega, Roy William
    Makerere Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Coll Hlth Sci, Kampala, Uganda.
    Ostenson, Claes-Goran
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Diabet & Endocrine Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kirunda, Barbara
    Makerere Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Coll Hlth Sci, Kampala, Uganda.
    Kasujja, Francis Xavier
    Makerere Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Coll Hlth Sci, Kampala, Uganda.
    Guwattude, David
    Makerere Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Coll Hlth Sci, Kampala, Uganda.
    Puoane, Thandi
    Univ Western Cape, Sch Publ Hlth, Bellville, South Africa.
    Sanders, David
    Univ Western Cape, Sch Publ Hlth, Bellville, South Africa.
    Peterson, Stefan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tomson, Goran
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Carl Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Absetz, Pilvikki
    Collaborat Care Syst Finland, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Publ Hlth & Clin Nutr, Kuopio, Finland.
    Van Olmen, Josefien
    Inst Trop Med, Dept Publ Hlth, Antwerp, Belgium;Univ Antwerp, Dept Primary & Interdisciplinary Care, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Diabetes self-management in three different income settings: Cross-learning of barriers and opportunities2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 3, article id e0213530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The burden of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly, not least in Sub-Saharan Africa, and disadvantaged populations are disproportionally affected. Self-management is a key strategy for people at risk of or with type 2 diabetes, but implementation is a challenge. The objective of this study is to assess the determinants of self-management from an implementation perspective in three settings: two rural districts in Uganda, an urban township in South Africa, and socio-economically disadvantaged suburbs in Sweden. Data collection followed an exploratory multiple-case study design, integrating data from interviews, focus group discussions, and observations. Data collection and analysis were guided by a contextualized version of a transdisciplinary framework for self-management. Findings indicate that people at risk of or with type 2 diabetes are aware of major self-management strategies, but fail to integrate these into their daily lives. Depending on the setting, opportunities to facilitate implementation of self-management include: improving patient-provider interaction, improving health service delivery, and encouraging community initiatives supporting self-management. Modification of the physical environment (e.g. accessibility to healthy food) and the socio-cultural environment (i.e. norms, values, attitudes, and social support) may have an important influence on people's lifestyle. Regarding the study methodology, we learned that this innovative approach can lead to a comprehensive analysis of self-management determinants across different settings. An important barrier was the difficult contextualization of concepts like perceived autonomy and self-efficacy. Intervention studies are needed to confirm whether the pathways suggested by this study are valid and to test the proposed opportunities for change.

  • Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Dept Hlth Care Sci, Palliat Res Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pohlkamp, Lilian
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Dept Hlth Care Sci, Palliat Res Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrike
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Dept Hlth Care Sci, Palliat Res Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childs Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eisma, Maarten C.
    Univ Groningen, Dept Clin Psychol & Expt Psychopathol, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Rumination in bereaved parents: Psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Utrecht Grief Rumination Scale (UGRS)2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Bereaved parents may be at higher risk to develop persistent, severe and disabling grief, termed prolonged grief. Grief rumination, repetitive thinking about the causes and consequences of the loss, is a malleable cognitive process that maintains prolonged grief. Grief rumination can be measured with the Utrecht Grief Rumination Scale (UGRS). The present study aimed to examine the psychometric properties of the new Swedish version of the UGRS in a sample of bereaved parents.

    Methods

    A Swedish nationwide postal survey including measures of demographic and loss-related variables, grief rumination (UGRS), and symptoms of prolonged grief, posttraumatic stress, anxiety, depression, and insomnia, was completed by 226 parents (133 mothers and 93 fathers) who lost a child to cancer in the past five years. Psychometric properties of the UGRS were examined through confirmatory factor analyses (CFA), reliability analyses, and assessment of UGRS score associations with symptoms of prolonged grief, posttraumatic stress, depression, anxiety, and insomnia.

    Results

    The internal consistency of the Swedish UGRS was good. The CFA yielded an acceptable fit for a two-factor hierarchical model with five sub-factors. Grief rumination was positively associated with all psychopathology symptom measures. Higher scores on UGRS were found in parents with possible prolonged grief disorder compared to those without (d=1.47). Moreover, the Swedish UGRS was associated with prolonged grief symptoms over and above loss-related and demographic variables and other psychopathology symptoms.

    Conclusions

    The Swedish UGRS demonstrated good psychometric properties, which supports its use as a measure to assess grief rumination in Swedish bereaved parents in research and practice.

  • Holmstrom, Oscar
    et al.
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki, Finland.
    Linder, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki, Finland.
    Moilanen, Hannu
    Univ Oulu, Ctr Microscopy & Nanotechnol, Oulu, Finland.
    Suutala, Antti
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nordling, Stig
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Pathol, Helsinki, Finland.
    Stahls, Anders
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland;HUSLAB Pathol Lab, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lundin, Mikael
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki, Finland.
    Diwan, Vinod
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundin, Johan
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki, Finland;Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Detection of breast cancer lymph node metastases in frozen sections with a point-of care low-cost microscope scanner2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 3, article id e0208366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Detection of lymph node metastases is essential in breast cancer diagnostics and staging, affecting treatment and prognosis. lntraoperative microscopy analysis of sentinel lymph node frozen sections is standard for detection of axillary metastases but requires access to a pathologist for sample analysis. Remote analysis of digitized samples is an alternative solution but is limited by the requirement for high-end slide scanning equipment.

    Objective

    To determine whether the image quality achievable with a low-cost, miniature digital microscope scanner is sufficient for detection of metastases in breast cancer lymph node frozen sections.

    Methods

    Lymph node frozen sections from 79 breast cancer patients were digitized using a prototype miniature microscope scanner and a high-end slide scanner. Images were independently reviewed by two pathologists and results compared between devices with conventional light microscopy analysis as ground truth.

    Results

    Detection of metastases in the images acquired with the miniature scanner yielded an overall sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 99% and showed strong agreement when compared to light microscopy (k = 0.91). Strong agreement was also observed when results were compared to results from the high-end slide scanner (k = 0.94). A majority of discrepant cases were micrometastases and sections of which no anticytokeratin staining was available.

    Conclusion

    Accuracy of detection of metastatic cells in breast cancer sentinel lymph node frozen sections by visual analysis of samples digitized using low-cost, point-of-care microscopy is comparable to analysis of digital samples scanned using a high-end, whole slide scanner. This technique could potentially provide a workflow for digital diagnostics in resource-limited settings, facilitate sample analysis at the point-of-care and reduce the need for trained experts on-site during surgical procedures.

  • Saraiva, Sofia
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Andersson, Helén
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Höglund, Anders
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Dieterich, Christian
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Groger, Matthias
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Hordoir, Robinson
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Eilola, Kari
    SMHI, Research Department, Oceanography.
    Baltic Sea ecosystem response to various nutrient load scenarios in present and future climates2019In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 52, no 5-6, p. 3369-3387Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Knutsdotter Olofsson, Birgitta
    Lek för livet1991In: Leka för livet, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1991, p. 28-57Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • von Essen, Johan
    et al.
    Institutionen för socialvetenskap, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke högskola.
    Wallman Lundåsen, Susanne
    Mittuniversitetet, Avdelningen för samhällsvetenskap.
    Ideellt arbete inom idrottsrörelsen2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Omkring hälften av den vuxna befolkningen i det svenska samhället arbetar ideellt, vilket innebär att Sverige har ett tämligen omfattande ideellt arbete. Den enskilt största gruppen av alla dem som arbetar ideellt gör det inom idrottsrörelsen. Eftersom det är så många som arbetar ideellt inom olika idrottsföreningar utgör alla dessa insatser en stor och viktig resurs för idrottsrörelsen. Dessutom innebär de ideella insatserna att idrottsrörelsen vilar på ett folkligt engagemang som gör den till en folkrörelse som är förankrad i det svenska civilsamhället. Att studera ideellt arbete i idrottsrörelsen betyder alltså både att undersöka en betydande andel av det ideella arbete som utförs i det svenska samhället och att studera dem som med sina insatser bidrar till att göra en stor del av idrottsföreningarnas verksamhet möjlig. Detta är också vad denna rapport syftar till genom att beskriva ideellt arbete inom idrottsrörelsen.

    Rapporten kretsar kring ett antal frågor. En första fråga är om de som arbetar ideellt i idrottsorganisationer är typiska för dem som arbetar ideellt eller om de särskiljer de sig på något sätt. En andra fråga är vilken typ av insatser människor gör när de arbetar ideellt i idrottsföreningar. En tredje fråga är vad det är som motiverar dem som arbetar ideellt inom idrottsorganisationer och om det är så att deras motiv skiljer sig från dem som arbetar ideellt i andra ideella organisationer. En fjärde fråga är om idrottsföreningar ställer krav på dem som arbetar ideellt med tanke på allt ansvar som följer av att vara ideell ledare, funktionär eller förtroendevald. En sista fråga är hur de föräldrar som arbetar ideellt i de idrottsföreningar där deras barn idrottar ser på sitt engagemang. Dessa frågor syftar till att närma sig alla dem som arbetar ideellt inom idrottsföreningar och rapporten avslutas med en fördjupad diskussion och ett antal slutsatser.

    Rapporten bygger på den senaste av de fem nationella befolkningsundersökningar om medborgerligt engagemang som Ersta Sköndal högskola gjort sedan 1992. Befolkningsundersökningarna är baserade på ett obundet slumpmässigt urval av befolkningen. Ett antal frågor berörde specifikt erfarenheter av ideellt arbete inom idrottsföreningar och om det egna idrottandet. Förutom befolkningsundersökningen vilar rapporten på ett material som kommer från intervjuer med tio föräldrar som arbetar ideellt i den idrottsförening där deras barn bedriver en individuell idrott. Sammantaget bidrar dessa material med kunskap om det breda engagemang som sker inom idrottsrörelsen.

  • Koenigk, Torben
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Climate research - Rossby Centre.
    Gao, Y.
    Gastineau, G.
    Keenlyside, N.
    Nakamura, T.
    Ogawa, F.
    Orsolini, Y.
    Semenov, V.
    Suo, L.
    Tian, T.
    Wang, T.
    Wettstein, J. J.
    Yang, S.
    Impact of Arctic sea ice variations on winter temperature anomalies in northern hemispheric land areas2019In: Climate Dynamics, ISSN 0930-7575, E-ISSN 1432-0894, Vol. 52, no 5-6, p. 3111-3137Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Rosén, Johanna S
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Arndt, Anton
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control. Karolinska institutet.
    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Mason, Barry S
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Hutchinson, Michael J
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Tarassova, Olga
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Bjerkefors, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    The impact of impairment on kinematic and kinetic variables in Va'a paddling: Towards a sport-specific evidence-based classification system for Para Va'a.2019In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Para Va'a is a new Paralympic sport in which athletes with trunk and/or leg impairment compete over 200 m. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of impairment on kinematic and kinetic variables during Va'a ergometer paddling. Ten able-bodied and 44 Para Va'a athletes with impairments affecting: trunk and legs (TL), legs bilaterally (BL) or leg unilaterally (UL) participated. Differences in stroke frequency, mean paddling force, and joint angles and correlation of the joint angles with paddling force were examined. Able-bodied demonstrated significantly greater paddling force as well as knee and ankle flexion ranges of movement (ROM) on the top hand paddling side compared to TL, BL and UL. Able-bodied, BL and UL demonstrated greater paddling force and trunk flexion compared to TL, and UL demonstrated larger bottom hand paddling side knee and ankle flexion ROM compared to BL. Significant positive correlations were observed for both male and female athletes between paddling force and all trunk flexion angles and ROM in the trunk and pelvis rotation and bottom hand paddling side hip, knee and ankle flexion. The results of this study are important for creating an evidence-based classification system for Para Va'a.

  • Perotti, Elisabetta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Fäldt, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Kupsc, Andrzej
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Leupold, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Song, Jiao Jiao
    Shandong Univ, Jinan 250100, Shandong, Peoples R China;Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.
    Polarization observables in e(+) e(-) annihilation to a baryon-antibaryon pair2019In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 99, no 5, article id 056008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the helicity formalism of Jacob and Wick, we derive spin density matrices of baryon antibaryon pairs produced in e(+)e(-) annihilation. We consider the production of pairs with spins 1/2 + (1/2) over bar, 1/2 + (3/2) over bar (+c.c.) and 3/2 + (3/2) over bar. We provide modular expressions to include chains of weak hadronic two-body decays of the produced hyperons. The expressions are suitable for the analysis of high statistics data from J/psi and psi(2S) ecays at e(+) e(-) colliders, by fits to the fully differential angular distributions of the measured particles. We illustrate the method by examples, such as the inclusive measurement of the e(+) e(-) -> psi(2S) -> Omega(-)(Omega) over bar (+) process where one decay chain Omega(-) -> AK(-) followed by A -> p pi(-) is considered. Finally, we show that the inclusive angular distributions can be used to test spin assignment of the produced baryons.

  • Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Div Cardiovasc Med, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, N-0403 Oslo, Norway.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hosp Trust, Res Dept, Brumunddal, Norway;Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, N-2411 Elverum, Norway.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Decrease in inflammatory biomarker concentration by intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10: a subanalysis of osteopontin, osteoprotergerin, TNFr1, TNFr2 and TWEAK2019In: Journal of Inflammation, ISSN 1476-9255, E-ISSN 1476-9255, Vol. 16, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Inflammation is central to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 has been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality, and increase cardiac function in elderly persons with a low intake of selenium. There are indications that one of the mechanisms of this positive effect is a decrease in inflammation.

    Methods:

    Osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, sTNF receptor 1, sTNF receptor 2 and the tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis called TWEAK, were determined in plasma after 6 months and 42months in 219 community-living elderly persons, of whom 119 received supplements of selenium (200g/day) and coenzyme Q10 (200mg/day), and 101 received a placebo. Repeated measures of variance were used to evaluate the levels, and the results were validated through ANCOVA analyses with adjustments for important covariates.

    Results:

    Significantly lower concentrations of four of the five biomarkers for inflammation were observed as a result of the intervention with the supplements. Only TWEAK did not show significant differences.

    Conclusion:

    In this sub-analysis of the intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10 or placebo in an elderly community-living population, biomarkers for inflammation were evaluated. A significantly lower concentration in four of the five biomarkers tested could be demonstrated as a result of the supplementation, indicating a robust effect on the inflammatory system. The decrease in inflammation could be one of the mechanisms behind the positive clinical results on reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality reported earlier as a result of the intervention. The study is small and should be regarded as hypothesis-generating, but nonetheless adds important data about mechanisms presently known to increase the risk of clinical effects such as reduced cardiovascular mortality, increased cardiac function and better health-related quality of life scoring, as previously demonstrated in the active treatment group.

  • Aaboud, M.
    et al.
    Facult ́e des Sciences, Universit ́e Mohamed Premier and LPTPM, Oujda, Morocco.
    Asimakopoulou, Eleni M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bergeås Kuutmann, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bokan, Petar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Brenner, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ekelöf, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, FREIA.
    Ellert, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ferrari, Arnaud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Gradin, P. O. J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Isacson, Max F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Mårtensson, Mikael U.F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    De Bruin, P. H. Sales
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Zwalinski, L.
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Search for long-lived particles produced in pp collisions at root s=13 TeV that decay into displaced hadronic jets in the ATLAS muon spectrometer2019In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 99, no 5, article id 052005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A search for the decay of neutral, weakly interacting, long-lived particles using data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. The analysis in this paper uses 36.1 fb(-1) of proton-proton collision data at root s =13 TeV recorded in 2015-2016. The search employs techniques for reconstructing vertices of long-lived particles decaying into jets in the muon spectrometer exploiting a two-vertex strategy and a novel technique that requires only one vertex in association with additional activity in the detector that improves the sensitivity for longer lifetimes. The observed numbers of events are consistent with the expected background and limits for several benchmark signals are determined.

  • Ablikim, M.
    et al.
    Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049, People’s Republic of China.
    Andersson, Walter Ikegami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Johansson, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Kupsc, Andrzej
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Li, Cui
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Papenbrock, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Pettersson, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Schönning, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Wolke, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Zou, J. H.
    Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049, People’s Republic of China.
    Evidence of a Resonant Structure in the e(+) e(-) -> pi(+) (DD)-D-0*(-) Cross Section between 4.05 and 4.60 GeV2019In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 122, no 10, article id 102002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cross section of the process e(+) e(-) -> pi(+) (DD)-D-0*(-) for center-of-mass energies from 4.05 to 4.60 GeV is measured precisely using data samples collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII storage ring. Two enhancements are clearly visible in the cross section around 4.23 and 4.40 GeV. Using several models to describe the dressed cross section yields stable parameters for the first enhancement, which has a mass of 4228.6 +/- 4.1 +/- 6.3 MeV/c(2) and a width of 77.0 +/- 6.8 +/- 6.3 MeV, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second ones are systematic. Our resonant mass is consistent with previous observations of the Y(4220) state and the theoretical prediction of a D (D) over bar (1)(2420) molecule. This result is the first observation of Y(4220) associated with an open-charm final state. Fits with three resonance functions with additional Y(4260), Y(4320), Y(4360), psi(4415), or a new resonance do not show significant contributions from either of these resonances. The second enhancement is not from a single known resonance. It could contain contributions from psi(4415) and other resonances, and a detailed amplitude analysis is required to better understand this enhancement.

  • Aaboud, M.
    et al.
    Facult ́e des Sciences, Universit ́e Mohamed Premier and LPTPM, Oujda, Morocco.
    Asimakopoulou, Eleni M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bergeås Kuutmann, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bokan, Petar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Brenner, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ekelöf, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, FREIA.
    Ellert, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ferrari, Arnaud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Gradin, P. O. J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Isacson, Max F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Mårtensson, Mikael U.F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    De Bruin, P. H. Sales
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Zwalinski, L.
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Search for heavy long-lived multicharged particles in proton-proton collisions at root s=13 TeV using the ATLAS detector2019In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 99, no 5, article id 052003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A search for heavy long-lived multicharged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data with an integrated luminosity of 36.1 fb(-1) collected in 2015 and 2016 from proton-proton collisions at root s = 13 TeV are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionization, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from vertical bar q vertical bar = 2e to vertical bar q vertical bar = 7e, are searched for. No events are observed, and 95% confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a Drell-Yan production model. Multicharged particles with masses between 50 and 980-1220 GeV (depending on their electric charge) are excluded.

  • Boudjemia, Nacer
    et al.
    Univ Oulu, Nano & Mol Syst Res Unit, POB 3000, Oulu 90014, Finland.
    Jankala, Kari
    Univ Oulu, Nano & Mol Syst Res Unit, POB 3000, Oulu 90014, Finland.
    Gejo, Tatsuo
    RIKEN, SPring 8 Ctr, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795148, Japan;Univ Hyogo, Grad Sch Mat Sci, Kamigori, Hyogo 6781297, Japan.
    Nagaya, Kiyonobu
    RIKEN, SPring 8 Ctr, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795148, Japan;Kyoto Univ, Dept Phys, Kyoto 6068502, Japan.
    Tamasaku, Kenji
    RIKEN, SPring 8 Ctr, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795148, Japan.
    Huttula, Marko
    Univ Oulu, Nano & Mol Syst Res Unit, POB 3000, Oulu 90014, Finland.
    Piancastelli, Maria Novella
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics. RIKEN, SPring 8 Ctr, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795148, Japan;Sorbonne Univ, CNRS, LCPMR, F-75005 Paris, France.
    Simon, Marc
    RIKEN, SPring 8 Ctr, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795148, Japan;Sorbonne Univ, CNRS, LCPMR, F-75005 Paris, France.
    Oura, Masaki
    RIKEN, SPring 8 Ctr, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795148, Japan.
    Deep core photoionization of iodine in CH3I and CF3I molecules: how deep down does the chemical shift reach?2019In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 5448-5454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hard X-ray electron spectroscopic study of iodine 1s and 2s photoionization of iodomethane (CH3I) and trifluoroiodomethane (CF3I) molecules is presented. The experiment was carried out at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility in Japan. The results are analyzed with the aid of relativistic molecular and atomic calculations. It is shown that charge redistribution within the molecule is experimentally observable even for very deep levels and is a function of the number of electron vacancies. We also show that the analysis of Auger spectra subsequent to hard X-ray photoionization can be used to provide insight into charge distribution in molecules and highlight the necessity of quantum electrodynamics corrections in the prediction of core shell binding energies in molecules that contain heavy atoms.

  • Public defence: 2019-05-17 12:00 Hb116, Jönköping
    Öberg, Joakim
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Learning Practices inside and outside School (LPS), Plats, Identitet, Lärande (PIL).
    Samhällskunskap från styrdokument till undervisning: Tjugo lärare ramar in vad som påverkar deras praktik2019Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this doctoral thesis in social studies didactics is to examine what teachers in social studies themselves perceive as the most important influencing factors for transforming the social studies subject, based on the intentions of the curriculum (the formulation arena), into social studies classroom teaching and assessment (the realisation arena), and how these perceptions have changed over time. It is thus what happens between the formulation arena and the realisation arena - the transformation arena, that is the focus of this thesis. The study is based on a hermeneutic-phenomenological lifeworld approach where phenomenological description and hermeneutic interpretation are essential. The empirical data consist of lifeworld interviews with 20 teachers in social studies in lower and upper secondary school; ten with long professional experience and ten fairly recently graduated.

    Based on inspiration from the frame factor theoretical perspective, the result is thematically organised according to four dimensions of influencing factors: the personal dimension, the didactic dimension, the governing dimension and the societal dimension. Each of these dimensions is divided into a number of variations. The dimensions are defined along a continuum of the personally close to the societally distanced. In addition to these dimensions, the student-related aspect, which accounts for the students as an influencing factor, was introduced. The teachers in the study do not talk about the students as an influencing factor without linking them to one of the four dimensions.

    The conclusion drawn from the study is that the 20 teachers all have very different stories about what they perceive as the most important influencing factors. Some focus on personal background or personal interests. Others focus on didactic ideas, on the curriculum or on organisational and economic frames. The study also shows that the teachers all have one or two dominant dimensions discernible in their stories, which also affect how they talk about the other dimensions. The teachers' stories also show that they feel that the teaching and what affects it change significantly over time. At the collective level, the two respondent groups differ on a number of aspects; however, the interview material reveals similarities among the individual teachers, whether they have worked for 40 years or are newly graduated, when it comes to other aspects.

    Perhaps the most important contribution of the study is that it exemplifies theoretical perspectives by, for instance, highlighting that what affects the teaching of a subject is so complex that the framework factor theoretical scaffolding must be adapted to the specific study and its issues and research materials.

  • Chauhan, Abhimanyu Singh
    et al.
    Publ Hlth Fdn India, Plot 47,Sect 44, Gurgaon 122002, Haryana, India;Univ Liege, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Fac Med, Hosp Dist, Hippocrates Ave 13,Bldg 23, B-4000 Liege, Belgium.
    George, Mathew Sunil
    Indian Inst Publ Hlth, Gurgaon 122002, Haryana, India;Univ Canberra, Ctr Res & Act Publ Hlth CeRAPH, Bldg 22,Floor B,Univ Dr, Bruce, ACT 261, Australia.
    Lindahl, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Int Livestock Res Inst, Nairobi 3070900100, Kenya.
    Grace, Delia
    Int Livestock Res Inst, Nairobi 3070900100, Kenya.
    Kakkar, Manish
    Publ Hlth Fdn India, Plot 47,Sect 44, Gurgaon 122002, Haryana, India.
    Community, system and policy level drivers of bovine tuberculosis in smallholder periurban dairy farms in India: a qualitative enquiry2019In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Rapid urbanization has led to expansion of peri-urban fringes, where intensive, industry-style livestock rearing has led to emerging vulnerabilities at the human-animal-environment interface. This study was undertaken to understand the health system and farm-level factors that influenced the risk of transmission of bovine Tuberculosis (bTB) in animals and humans in peri-urban smallholder dairy farms of India.

    Methods

    Thematic guides were developing through literature review and expert consultation. In-depth interviews were conducted till attainment of saturation. Identification of core themes was followed by etiological enquiry and generation of a conceptual model.

    Results

    Veterinarians were consulted as a last resort after home-remedies and quacks had failed. Damage control measures, especially with respect to- selling or abandoning sick animals, added to the risk of disease transmission. Although civic authorities believed in the adequacy of a functioning laboratory network, end users were aggrieved at the lack of services. Despite the presence of extension services, knowledge and awareness was limited, promoting risky behaviour. The absence of cogent policies in dealing with bTB was a significant barrier. Stakeholders did not consider bTB to be a major concern. It is possible that they underestimate the problem.

    Conclusion

    The current study helps to identify gaps which need to be addressed through collaborative research, and OneHealth interventions to build community awareness.

  • Aartsen, M. G.
    et al.
    Univ Canterbury, Dept Phys & Astron, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Ackermann, M.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Adams, J.
    Univ Canterbury, Dept Phys & Astron, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Aguilar, J. A.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Ahlers, M.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ahrens, M.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Altmann, D.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany.
    Andeen, K.
    Marquette Univ, Dept Phys, Milwaukee, WI 53201 USA.
    Anderson, T.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, 104 Davey Lab, University Pk, PA 16802 USA.
    Ansseau, I.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Anton, G.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany.
    Arguelles, C.
    MIT, Dept Phys, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.
    Auffenberg, J.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Axani, S.
    MIT, Dept Phys, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.
    Backes, P.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Bagherpour, H.
    Univ Canterbury, Dept Phys & Astron, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Bai, X.
    South Dakota Sch Mines & Technol, Phys Dept, Rapid City, SD 57701 USA.
    Barbano, A.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Phys Nucl & Corpusculaire, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland.
    Barron, J. P.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
    Barwick, S. W.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Phys & Astron, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Baum, V.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.
    Bay, R.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Beatty, J. J.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Phys, Columbus, OH 43210 USA;Ohio State Univ, Ctr Cosmol & Astroparticle Phys, Columbus, OH 43210 USA;Ohio State Univ, Dept Astron, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Tjus, J. Becker
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fak Phys & Astron, D-44780 Bochum, Germany.
    Becker, K. -H
    BenZvi, S.
    Univ Rochester, Dept Phys & Astron, Rochester, NY 14627 USA.
    Berley, D.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.
    Bernardini, E.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Besson, D. Z.
    Univ Kansas, Dept Phys & Astron, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA.
    Binder, G.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA;Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Bindig, D.
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany.
    Blaufuss, E.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.
    Blot, S.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Bohm, C.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Boerner, M.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany.
    Bos, F.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fak Phys & Astron, D-44780 Bochum, Germany.
    Boeser, S.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.
    Botner, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bourbeau, E.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bourbeau, J.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Bradascio, F.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Braun, J.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Bretz, H. -P
    Bron, S.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Phys Nucl & Corpusculaire, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland.
    Brostean-Kaiser, J.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Burgman, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Busse, R. S.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Carver, T.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Phys Nucl & Corpusculaire, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland.
    Chen, C.
    Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Phys, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA;Georgia Inst Technol, Ctr Relativist Astrophys, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA.
    Cheung, E.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.
    Chirkin, D.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Clark, K.
    SNOLAB, 1039 Reg Rd 24,Creighton Mine 9, Lively, ON P3Y 1N2, Canada.
    Classen, L.
    Westfal Wilhelms Univ Munster, Inst Kernphys, D-48149 Munster, Germany.
    Collin, G. H.
    MIT, Dept Phys, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.
    Conrad, J. M.
    MIT, Dept Phys, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.
    Coppin, P.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Correa, P.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Cowen, D. F.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Astron & Astrophys, 525 Davey Lab, University Pk, PA 16802 USA;Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, 104 Davey Lab, University Pk, PA 16802 USA.
    Cross, R.
    Univ Rochester, Dept Phys & Astron, Rochester, NY 14627 USA.
    Dave, P.
    Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Phys, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA;Georgia Inst Technol, Ctr Relativist Astrophys, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA.
    Day, M.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    de Andre, J. P. A. M.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA.
    De Clercq, C.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    DeLaunay, J. J.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, 104 Davey Lab, University Pk, PA 16802 USA.
    Dembinski, H.
    Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.
    Deoskar, K.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    De Ridder, S.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Phys & Astron, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Desiati, P.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    de Vries, K. D.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    de Wasseige, G.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    de With, M.
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-12489 Berlin, Germany.
    DeYoung, T.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA.
    Diaz-Velez, J. C.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Dujmovic, H.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Dept Phys, Suwon 440746, South Korea.
    Dunkman, M.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, 104 Davey Lab, University Pk, PA 16802 USA.
    Dvorak, E.
    South Dakota Sch Mines & Technol, Phys Dept, Rapid City, SD 57701 USA.
    Eberhardt, B.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.
    Ehrhardt, T.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.
    Eichmann, B.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fak Phys & Astron, D-44780 Bochum, Germany.
    Eller, P.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, 104 Davey Lab, University Pk, PA 16802 USA.
    Evenson, P. A.
    Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.
    Fahey, S.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Fazely, A. R.
    Southern Univ, Dept Phys, Baton Rouge, LA 70813 USA.
    Felde, J.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.
    Filimonov, K.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Finley, C.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franckowiak, A.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Friedman, E.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.
    Fritz, A.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.
    Gaisser, T. K.
    Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.
    Gallagher, J.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Astron, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Ganster, E.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Garrappa, S.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Gerhardt, L.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Ghorbani, K.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Giang, W.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
    Glauch, T.
    Tech Univ Munich, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany.
    Gluesenkamp, T.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany.
    Goldschmidt, A.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Gonzalez, J. G.
    Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.
    Grant, D.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
    Griffith, Z.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Haack, C.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Hallgren, Allan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Halve, L.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Halzen, F.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Hanson, K.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Hebecker, D.
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-12489 Berlin, Germany.
    Heereman, D.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Helbing, K.
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany.
    Hellauer, R.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.
    Hickford, S.
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany.
    Hignight, J.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA.
    Hill, G. C.
    Univ Adelaide, Dept Phys, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia.
    Hoffman, K. D.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.
    Hoffmann, R.
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany.
    Hoinka, T.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany.
    Hokanson-Fasig, B.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Hoshina, K.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Tokyo, Earthquake Res Inst, Bunkyo Ku, Tokyo 1130032, Japan.
    Huang, F.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, 104 Davey Lab, University Pk, PA 16802 USA.
    Huber, M.
    Tech Univ Munich, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany.
    Hultqvist, K.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Huennefeld, M.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany.
    Hussain, R.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    In, S.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Dept Phys, Suwon 440746, South Korea.
    Iovine, N.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Ishihara, A.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan.
    Jacobi, E.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Japaridze, G. S.
    Clark Atlanta Univ, CTSPS, Atlanta, GA 30314 USA.
    Jeong, M.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Dept Phys, Suwon 440746, South Korea.
    Jero, K.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Jones, B. J. P.
    Univ Texas Arlington, Dept Phys, 502 Yates St,Sci Hall Rm 108,POB 19059, Arlington, TX 76019 USA.
    Kalaczynski, P.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Kang, W.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Dept Phys, Suwon 440746, South Korea.
    Kappes, A.
    Westfal Wilhelms Univ Munster, Inst Kernphys, D-48149 Munster, Germany.
    Kappesser, D.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.
    Karg, T.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Karle, A.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Katz, U.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany.
    Kauer, M.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Keivani, A.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, 104 Davey Lab, University Pk, PA 16802 USA.
    Kelley, J. L.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Kheirandish, A.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Kim, J.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Dept Phys, Suwon 440746, South Korea.
    Kintscher, T.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Kiryluk, J.
    SUNY Stony Brook, Dept Phys & Astron, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA.
    Kittler, T.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany.
    Klein, S. R.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA;Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Koirala, R.
    Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.
    Kolanoski, H.
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-12489 Berlin, Germany.
    Koepke, L.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.
    Kopper, C.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
    Kopper, S.
    Univ Alabama, Dept Phys & Astron, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA.
    Koskinen, D. J.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kowalski, M.
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-12489 Berlin, Germany;DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Krings, K.
    Tech Univ Munich, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany.
    Kroll, M.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fak Phys & Astron, D-44780 Bochum, Germany.
    Krueckl, G.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.
    Kunwar, S.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Kurahashi, N.
    Drexel Univ, Dept Phys, 3141 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Kyriacou, A.
    Univ Adelaide, Dept Phys, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia.
    Labare, M.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Phys & Astron, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Lanfranchi, J. L.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, 104 Davey Lab, University Pk, PA 16802 USA.
    Larson, M. J.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lauber, F.
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany.
    Leonard, K.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Leuermann, M.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Liu, Q. R.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Lohfink, E.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.
    Mariscal, C. J. Lozano
    Westfal Wilhelms Univ Munster, Inst Kernphys, D-48149 Munster, Germany.
    Lu, L.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan.
    Luenemann, J.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Luszczak, W.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Madsen, J.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, River Falls, WI 54022 USA.
    Maggi, G.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Mahn, K. B. M.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA.
    Makino, Y.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan.
    Mancina, S.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Maris, I. C.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Maruyama, R.
    Yale Univ, Dept Phys, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.
    Mase, K.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan.
    Maunu, R.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.
    Meagher, K.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Medici, M.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Meier, M.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany.
    Menne, T.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany.
    Merino, G.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Meures, T.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Miarecki, S.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA;Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Micallef, J.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA.
    Momente, G.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.
    Montaruli, T.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Phys Nucl & Corpusculaire, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland.
    Moore, R. W.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
    Moulai, M.
    MIT, Dept Phys, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.
    Nagai, R.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan.
    Nahnhauer, R.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Nakarmi, P.
    Univ Alabama, Dept Phys & Astron, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA.
    Naumann, U.
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany.
    Neer, G.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA.
    Niederhausen, H.
    SUNY Stony Brook, Dept Phys & Astron, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA.
    Nowicki, S. C.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
    Nygren, D. R.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Pollmann, A. Obertacke
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany.
    Olivas, A.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.
    O'Murchadha, A.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    O'Sullivan, E.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Palczewski, T.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA;Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Pandya, H.
    Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.
    Pankova, D. V.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, 104 Davey Lab, University Pk, PA 16802 USA.
    Peiffer, P.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.
    Pérez de los Heros, Carlos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Pieloth, D.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany.
    Pinat, E.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Pizzuto, A.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Plum, M.
    Marquette Univ, Dept Phys, Milwaukee, WI 53201 USA.
    Price, P. B.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Przybylski, G. T.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Raab, C.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Rameez, M.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Rauch, L.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Rawlins, K.
    Univ Alaska Anchorage, Dept Phys & Astron, 3211 Provdence Dr, Anchorage, AK 99508 USA.
    Rea, I. C.
    Tech Univ Munich, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany.
    Reimann, R.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Relethford, B.
    Drexel Univ, Dept Phys, 3141 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Renzi, G.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Resconi, E.
    Tech Univ Munich, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany.
    Rhode, W.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany.
    Richman, M.
    Drexel Univ, Dept Phys, 3141 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Robertson, S.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Rongen, M.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Rott, C.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Dept Phys, Suwon 440746, South Korea.
    Ruhe, T.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany.
    Ryckbosch, D.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Phys & Astron, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Rysewyk, D.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA.
    Safa, I.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Herrera, S. E. Sanchez
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
    Sandrock, A.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany.
    Sandroos, J.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.
    Santander, M.
    Univ Alabama, Dept Phys & Astron, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA.
    Sarkar, S.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark;Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada;Univ Oxford, Dept Phys, 1 Keble Rd, Oxford OX1 3NP, England.
    Satalecka, K.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Schaufel, M.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Schlunder, P.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany.
    Schmidt, T.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.
    Schneider, A.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Schneider, J.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany.
    Schoeneberg, S.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fak Phys & Astron, D-44780 Bochum, Germany.
    Schumacher, L.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Sclafani, S.
    Drexel Univ, Dept Phys, 3141 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Seckel, D.
    Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.
    Seunarine, S.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, River Falls, WI 54022 USA.
    Soedingrekso, J.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany.
    Soldin, D.
    Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.
    Song, M.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.
    Spiczak, G. M.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, River Falls, WI 54022 USA.
    Spiering, C.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Stachurska, J.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Stamatikos, M.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Phys, Columbus, OH 43210 USA;Ohio State Univ, Ctr Cosmol & Astroparticle Phys, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Stanev, T.
    Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.
    Stasik, A.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Stein, R.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Stettner, J.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Steuer, A.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.
    Stezelberger, T.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Stokstad, R. G.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Stoel, A.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan.
    Strotjohann, N. L.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Stuttard, T.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sullivan, G. W.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA.
    Sutherland, M.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Phys, Columbus, OH 43210 USA;Ohio State Univ, Ctr Cosmol & Astroparticle Phys, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Taboada, I.
    Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Phys, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA;Georgia Inst Technol, Ctr Relativist Astrophys, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA.
    Tenholt, F.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fak Phys & Astron, D-44780 Bochum, Germany.
    Ter-Antonyan, S.
    Southern Univ, Dept Phys, Baton Rouge, LA 70813 USA.
    Terliuk, A.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Tilav, S.
    Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.
    Tobin, M. N.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Toennis, C.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Dept Phys, Suwon 440746, South Korea.
    Toscano, S.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Tosi, D.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Tselengidou, M.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany.
    Tung, C. F.
    Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Phys, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA;Georgia Inst Technol, Ctr Relativist Astrophys, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA.
    Turcati, A.
    Tech Univ Munich, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany.
    Turcotte, R.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Turley, C. F.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, 104 Davey Lab, University Pk, PA 16802 USA.
    Ty, B.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Unger, E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Elorrieta, M. A. Unland
    Westfal Wilhelms Univ Munster, Inst Kernphys, D-48149 Munster, Germany.
    Usner, M.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Van Driessche, W.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Phys & Astron, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    van Eijk, D.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    van Eijndhoven, N.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.
    Vanheule, S.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Phys & Astron, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    van Santen, J.
    DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen, Germany.
    Vraeghe, M.
    Univ Ghent, Dept Phys & Astron, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Walck, C.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallace, A.
    Univ Adelaide, Dept Phys, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia.
    Wallraff, M.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Wandler, F. D.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
    Wandkowsky, N.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Watson, T. B.
    Univ Texas Arlington, Dept Phys, 502 Yates St,Sci Hall Rm 108,POB 19059, Arlington, TX 76019 USA.
    Weaver, C.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
    Weiss, M. J.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, 104 Davey Lab, University Pk, PA 16802 USA.
    Wendt, C.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Werthebach, J.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Westerhoff, S.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Whelan, B. J.
    Univ Adelaide, Dept Phys, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia.
    Whitehorn, N.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Phys & Astron, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Wiebe, K.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.
    Wiebusch, C. H.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Phys Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Wille, L.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Williams, D. R.
    Univ Alabama, Dept Phys & Astron, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA.
    Wills, L.
    Drexel Univ, Dept Phys, 3141 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Wolf, M.
    Tech Univ Munich, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany.
    Wood, J.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Wood, T. R.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
    Woolsey, E.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
    Woschnagg, K.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Wrede, G.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany.
    Xu, D. L.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Xu, X. W.
    Southern Univ, Dept Phys, Baton Rouge, LA 70813 USA.
    Xu, Y.
    SUNY Stony Brook, Dept Phys & Astron, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA.
    Yanez, J. P.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
    Yodh, G.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Phys & Astron, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Yoshida, S.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan.
    Yuan, T.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, 1150 Univ Ave, Madison, WI 53706 USA.
    Search for steady point-like sources in the astrophysical muon neutrino flux with 8 years of IceCube data2019In: European Physical Journal C, ISSN 1434-6044, E-ISSN 1434-6052, Vol. 79, no 3, article id 234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The IceCube Collaboration has observed a high-energy astrophysical neutrino flux and recently found evidence for neutrino emission from the blazar TXS 0506+056. These results open a new window into the high-energy universe. However, the source or sources of most of the observed flux of astrophysical neutrinos remains uncertain. Here, a search for steady point-like neutrino sources is performed using an unbinned likelihood analysis. The method searches for a spatial accumulation of muon-neutrino events using the very high-statistics sample of about 497,000 neutrinos recorded by IceCube between 2009 and 2017. The median angular resolution is approximate to 1 degrees at 1 TeV and improves to approximate to 0.3 degrees for neutrinos with an energy of 1 PeV. Compared to previous analyses, this search is optimized for point-like neutrino emission with the same flux-characteristics as the observed astrophysical muon-neutrino flux and introduces an improved event-reconstruction and parametrization of the background. The result is an improvement in sensitivity to the muon-neutrino flux compared to the previous analysis of approximate to 35% assuming an E-2 spectrum. The sensitivity on the muon-neutrino flux is at a level of E2dN/dE=310-13s-1. No new evidence for neutrino sources is found in a full sky scan and in an a priori candidate source list that is motivated by gamma-ray observations. Furthermore, no significant excesses above background are found from populations of sub-threshold sources. The implications of the non-observation for potential source classes are discussed.

  • Public defence: 2019-05-24 13:00 Forum Humanum, Jönköping
    Möller, Saffran
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Nursing Science. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Functioning in prosthetic users provided with and without a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee – relative effects on mobility, self-efficacy and attentional demand2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To undergo a lower limb amputation is a traumatic experience affecting the individual on physical as well as psychological levels and often leading to limitations in a person´s daily life. Following an amputation individual often receive a prosthesis to address impairments in mobility and functioning. The mechanical properties of the prosthesis can vary, and the choice of specific components to include in the device has been demonstrated to influence patient outcomes. Studies investigating the relative effects of different prosthetic knee components have generally focused upon physical and biomechanical outcomes, providing a rather narrow view of health-related states in prosthetic users. There is a need to view health and wellbeing of prosthetic users from a broader perspective by evaluating outcomes that reflect a variety of different factors that can influence their functioning.

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to describe and compare functioning in individuals with a trans-femoral amputation or knee disarticulation and to evaluate the relative effects of using non-microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees (non-MPK) or microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees (MPK).

    Methods: The four studies presented in this thesis used a cross-sectional, quantitative design with different types of data collection methods. These included self-report measures, capacity tests, a survey with two questionnaires and a measure of cortical brain activity during normal level waking and while performing a secondary task. One group of 42 individuals with lowerlimb amputations, using a prosthetic knee with or without microprocessor-control was included in the survey study. Another group of 29 individuals with a lower limb amputation, using a prosthetic knee with or without a microprocessor-control and a control group (n=16) participated in the remaining studies. Statistical tests were used to compare differences between groups using different knee joints, between prosthesis users and controls.

    Results: Individuals using a non-MPK had lower self-reported mobility and balance confidence as well as poorer results on mobility tests compared to those using an MPK. Results revealed no significant differences in self-rated health, daily step count or general self-efficacy. Increased cortical brain activity was seen in frontal cortex in individuals using a non-MPK in single-task walking compare to the MPK group and controls. A significant increase in brain activity was also seen in prefrontal cortex in dual-task walking compared to single-task walking in those walking with an MPK and controls.

    Conclusion: Combined results of all four studies suggest that persons provided with an MPK had better mobility, both self-rated and objectively evaluated, and better self-rated balance confidence than those who were using a non-MPK. Results also showed that an individual’s belief in their own ability was associated with the number of hours they use their prosthesis per week. Participants using a non-MPK had higher levels of cortical brain activity in the frontal cortex during walking, suggesting that the attentional demand required to walk was greater than for individuals using an MPK. Of particular interest for health professionals involved in prosthetic rehabilitation was the finding that significant increases in attentional demand were not always reflected in temporospatial gait parameters. This suggests that cognitive demands may not always be reflected in variables that are commonly evaluated in the clinical setting.

  • Banefelt, J.
    et al.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Akesson, K. E.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Clin & Mol Osteoporosis Res, Malmo, Sweden;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed, Malmo, Sweden.
    Spangeus, A.
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping Univ Hosp, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology and mineral metabolism.
    Karlsson, L.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strom, O.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ortsater, G.
    Quantify Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Libanati, C.
    UCB Biopharma Sprl, Allee Rech 60, B-1070 Brussels, Belgium.
    Toth, E.
    UCB Biopharma Sprl, Allee Rech 60, B-1070 Brussels, Belgium.
    Risk of imminent fracture following a previous fracture in a Swedish database study2019In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 601-609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The SummaryThis study examined the imminent risk of a future fracture within 1 and 2years following a first fracture in women aged 50years and older and assessed independent factors associated with risk of subsequent fractures. The study highlights the need to intervene rapidly after a fracture to prevent further fractures.IntroductionThis study aims to determine the imminent risk of subsequent fractures within 1 and 2years following a first fracture and to assess independent factors associated with subsequent fractures.MethodsRetrospective, observational cohort study of women aged 50years with a fragility fracture was identified from Swedish national registers. Clinical/demographic characteristics at the time of index fracture and cumulative fracture incidences up to 12 and 24months following index fracture were calculated. Risk factors for subsequent fracture were identified using multivariate regression analysis.ResultsTwo hundred forty-two thousand one hundred eight women (mean [SD] age 74 [12.5] years) were included. The cumulative subsequent fracture incidence at 12months was 7.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.9-7.2) and at 24months was 12.0% (95% CI, 11.8-12.1). The rate of subsequent fractures was highest in the first month (similar to 15 fractures per 1000 patient-years) and remained steady between 4 and 24months (similar to 5 fractures/1000 patient-years). Higher age was an independent risk factor for imminent subsequent fractures (at 24months, sub-distribution hazard ratio [HR], 3.07; p<0.001 for women 80-89years [reference 50-59years]). Index vertebral fracture was a strong independent risk factor for subsequent fracture (sub-distribution HR, 2.72 versus hip fracture; p<0.001 over 12months; HR, 2.23; p<0.001 over 24months).ConclusionsOur findings highlight the need to intervene rapidly after any fragility fracture in postmenopausal women. The occurrence of a fragility fracture provides healthcare systems with a unique opportunity to intervene to reduce the increased risk of subsequent fractures.

  • Johansson, Ulf
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics, JTH, Jönköping AI Lab (JAIL).
    Löfström, Tuwe
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Sundell, Håkan
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Linusson, Henrik
    Department of Information Technology, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Gidenstam, Anders
    Department of Information Technology, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Boström, Henrik
    School of Information and Communication Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Venn predictors for well-calibrated probability estimation trees2018In: Conformal and Probabilistic Prediction and Applications / [ed] A. Gammerman, V. Vovk, Z. Luo, E. Smirnov, & R. Peeters, 2018, p. 3-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Successful use of probabilistic classification requires well-calibrated probability estimates, i.e., the predicted class probabilities must correspond to the true probabilities. The standard solution is to employ an additional step, transforming the outputs from a classifier into probability estimates. In this paper, Venn predictors are compared to Platt scaling and isotonic regression, for the purpose of producing well-calibrated probabilistic predictions from decision trees. The empirical investigation, using 22 publicly available data sets, showed that the probability estimates from the Venn predictor were extremely well-calibrated. In fact, in a direct comparison using the accepted reliability metric, the Venn predictor estimates were the most exact on every data set.

  • Talman, Riikka
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Changeability as a quality in textile design2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The tendency to wear out and change is inherent in most materials, but – aside from a few exceptions – has been considered to be undesirable by both the industry and consumers. The work presented in this licentiate thesis suggests that, due to change in some form being an inherent property of textiles, it may be viable to look for alternative ways of designing and perceiving textiles that accept change as one of their qualities.

     The experimental work explores change as a quality in textiles from the perspective of the textile material, and examines irreversible changes in textiles from three different perspectives: form, use, and teaching changeability in the field of textile design. Changes in colour, pattern, texture, and structure were explored by developing knitted and woven textiles using materials with pronounced changeable properties, and exposing these to various stimuli, such as outdoor conditions and use in workshops.

    The experiments suggest that the combination of material and structure defines how textiles change when exposed to various stimuli. A material’s properties define what the textile reacts to and how, while the structure of the textile influences how it changes through the amount and placement of materials. In addition, time and the handling of a textile shape the exact changes that take place.

    Designing with changeability as a quality in textiles opens up for alternative possibilities as regards creating expressions, wherein time and change are design variables alongside more traditional qualities, and could encourage a diversity of lifespans and changes over various timescales, better connecting textiles to the properties of their raw materials. This may mean that an alternative method for evaluating quality based on change instead of permanence could be viable, wherein the notion of permanence as a sign of quality in textiles is questioned.

  • Public defence: 2019-05-10 09:00 Kollegiesalen, Stockholm
    Locke, Ryan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    City Re-Making Approaches in Contemporary Urbanism: “Re-Urbanism” as a Strategy for the Revitalization of Detroit and Declining Cities2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many cities today are experiencing extreme widespread urban decline, at a time when urban growth and revitalization are prioritized on the agenda. This dissertation examines a number of prominent urban revitalization strategies for declining cities, specifically highlighting the emblematic case of Detroit as a research subject. That city offers many lessons as the epitome of both urban decline and urban revitalization, as evidenced through the media narratives surrounding the “rebirth of Detroit” and its positive improvements over recent years. Through this and other case studies, the dissertation investigates different approaches in the leading contemporary paradigms of urbanism, including the role of place-based and heritage-based strategies for the declining city, and their different structural approaches. These include differences sought in both city structure, and in the collaborative structure of revitalizing institutions. From there, the dissertation draws key lessons together into a synthesis approach called “Re-Urbanism” – an advancement of a model originally developed by Robert Fishman. The model describes strategic partnerships between local government entities, private business leaders, private charitable foundations, small scale grass roots activism, and local entrepreneurship, all aimed at making place-based, heritage-based structural reconnections within the city itself. The dissertation concludes with specific policy and practice recommendations, as well as ideas for further research.

  • Public defence: 2019-05-24 10:15 F3, Stockholm
    Winroth, Marcus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Dynamics of Exhaust Valve Flows and Confined Bluff Body Vortex Shedding2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis can be divided into two interconnected topics; engine exhaust-valve flows and confined bluff-body vortex shedding. When optimising engine flow systems it is common to use low order simulation tools that require empirical inputs, for instance with respect to flow losses across the exhaust valves. These are typically obtained from experiments at low pressure ratios and for steady flow, assuming the flow to be insensitive to the pressure ratio and that it can be considered as quasi-steady. Here these two assumptions are challenged by comparing measurements of mass-flow rates under steady and dynamic conditions at realistic pressure ratios. The experiments with a static valve were carried out using a high-pressure flow bench at cylinder pressures up to 500 kPa. For the dynamic-valve experiments the transient flow rate during the blowdown phase of an initially pressurised cylinder was determined. Here a linear motor actuated the valve to obtain equivalent engine speeds in the range 800–1350 rpm. It was shown that neither of the above mentioned assumptions are valid and a new non-dimensional quantification of the steadiness of the process was formulated. Furthermore it was shown through Schlieren visualisation that the shock structures in the exhaust port differ depending on if the system dynamics are included or not. The study shows that reliable results of flow losses past exhaust valves can only be obtained in dynamic experiments at representative pressure ratios. The second topic arose from the need to monitor time-resolved mass-flow rates in conduits. A mass-flow meter based on vortex shedding from bluff bodies was designed where microphones are used to detect the shedding frequency. It consists of a forebody and a downstream mounted tail and the system was shown to be capable of measuring pulsating flow rates. Furthermore, the flow topology associated with different forebody and splitter plates has been characterised, through visualisation of the flow behind the shedder and on the splitter plate. It has been shown that for long splitter plates a “horse shoe” like vortex, which attaches to the tail, is formed. It has also been shown that another energetic mode (denoted mode-II) can interact with and disrupt the primary vortex formation. A hypothesis for the appearance of mode-II has been formulated, linking it to the periodic separation of the boundary layer at the conduit wall.

  • Ihre, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    Dissertatio politica, de morbis reipublicæ, cujus partem priorem, consensu ampliss. Senat. Academici in Illustri ad Salam Athenæo, præside, ... Johanne Ihre, ... publico examini modeste submittit stipendiarius regius, Petrus Kebon, Stockholmiensis. In Audit. Carol. Maj. ad diem 23. Decembr. anni MDCCXLIII. H. A. M. S.1743Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
  • Ihre, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    Dissertatio politica, de jure collectandi, quam ... sub præsidio ... Johannis Ihre, ... publice examinandam sistit alumnus regius Olavus Noræus, Uplandus, in auditorio Carol. Majori d. XXII. Decembris an. MDCCXLIII.1743Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
  • Ihre, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    Exercitium academicum, de ortu et permissione mali in republica, cujus partem posteriorem, ... sub præsidio ... Johannis Ihre, ... pro gradu candido bonorum examini modeste subjicit stipendiarius regius Petrus Dahlerus, Pet. Fil. Calmariensis. In Audit. Carol. Gustav. ad diem XVI. Maji. anni MDCCXLVI. H. A. M. S.1746Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
  • Ihre, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    Exercitium academicum, de ortu et permissione mali in republica, cujus partem priorem, ... sub præsidio ... Johannis Ihre, ... candido bonorum examini modeste subjicit Petrus Dahlerus, Pet. Fil. Calmariensis. In Audit. Carol. Majori ad diem XVI. Decemb. anni MDCCXLIII. H. A. M. S.1743Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
  • Ihre, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    Dissertatio politica posterior, eaque gradualis, de impedito felicitatis civilis progressu, quam, ... sub præsidio ... Johannis Ihre, ... candido bonorum examini modeste subjicit Ericus El. Gedner, Fierdhundrensis. In Audit. Carol. Minori ad diem XVIII. Dec. anni MDCCXLV. Horis ante meridiem solitis.1745Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
  • Ihre, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    Dissertatio politica prior, de impedito felicitatis civilis progressu, quam, ... sub præsidio ... Johannis Ihre, ... candido bonorum examini modeste subjicit Ericus El. Gedner, Fierdhundrensis. In Audit. Carol. Majori ad diem 5. Decemb. anni MDCCXLIII. H. A. M. S.1743Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
  • Ihre, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    Dissertatio philosophica, de falsa eudæmonologia gentilium, quam ... sub moderamine ... Johannis Ihre, ... æquo bonorum examini submittit Laurentius L. Svenonius, Wester-Gothus. In Auditorio Carolino Majori d. 26. Nov. anni MDCCXLIII. Horis solitis.1743Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
  • Ihre, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    Dissertatio politica, de jure veniæ, ... præside ... Johanne Ihre, ... ad publicum examen modeste defert, Carol. Maistr. Runneberg, Uplandus. In auditorio Carolino Majori d. 19. Nov. anni MDCCXLIII. H. A. M. S.1743Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
  • Ihre, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    D.D. Dissertatio historico-litteraria de academiis orbis Lvtherani, cvjvs partem alteram, ... moderante S:æ R:æ M:tis magnæ fidei viro ... Johanne Ihre, ... pro grav exhibet Carolvs L. Kämpe Vestrogothvs. A. S. R. S. A.1764Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
  • Ihre, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    Dissertatio historico-literaria, de academiis orbis Lutherani, cujus partem priorem, ... sub moderamine ... Johannis Ihre, ... publico examini submittit, S:æ R:æ M:tis stipendiarius Andreas O. Kyhlstedt, Ostro-Gothus. In Auditorio Carolino Majori d. 16 Novemb. anni MDCCXLIII. H. A. M. S.1743Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
  • Ihre, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    Dissertatio academica, de fundamento potestatis maritalis, quam ... præside ... Johanne Ihre, ... ad publicum examen deffert Stipendiarius Regius Johannes Joh. Köhler, Gothlandus. In Auditorio Carol. Majori die 12. Octob. anni MDCCXLIII. Horis solitis.1743Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)
  • Ihre, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy.
    Dissertationem politicam, qvæstionem, an percussorem immittere licitum sit? sistentem, ... in Regia Academia Upsaliensi, præside ... Johanne Ihre, ... pro gradu, publico examini modeste submittit Andreas Carlbaum, Dalekarlus. In Audit. Carol. Maj. die [31] Maji, anni MDCCXLIII, Horis, ante meridiem, solitis.1743Dissertation (older thesis) (Other academic)