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  • Public defence: 2018-05-18 09:00 Sal A, Unod T9, Umeå
    Tetui, Moses
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Participatory approaches to strengthening district health managers' capacity: Ugandan and global experiences2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:

    Residents of low in-come countries have persistently suffered poor health outcomes, modest progress made over time notwithstanding. Weak health systems are one of the key reasons for the less than optimum progress. These health systems are constrained by inadequately equipped managers who play a main role in curbing this progress. Strengthening the capacity of health managers capacity is one of the known ways to improve the performance of health systems. This study examined strategies for strengthening the capacity of health managers at the sub-national level, with a special focus on the Participatory Action Research (PAR) approach.

    Methods:

    I used an emergent qualitative design which included both primary data collection and a literature review. Primary data collection techniques included individual interviews, Focus Group Discussions (FGDs), participant observations, and a review of project documents and meeting minutes, while searching for peer-reviewed databases was used for the literature review. Several analytical tools were adopted to answer the objectives, including the grounded theory, content and thematic analysis approaches. The Critical Interpretive Synthesis (CIS) method was used to analyze the literature reviewed.

    Findings:

    Stakeholders’ perceived the approaches to strengthening health managers’ capacity as an overarching process comprised of three interconnected subprocesses namely: the professionalizing of health managers, the use of engaging approaches to learning, and the availability of a supportive work environment. PAR as an engaging approach to learning was experienced by stakeholders as a nuanced awakening approach. On the one hand, stakeholders felt engaged, valued, responsible, awakened and a sense of ownership. On the other hand, they felt conflicted, stressed and uncertain. The PAR approach enhanced health managers’ capacity to collaborate with others, be creative, attain goals, and review progress. Expanded spaces for interaction, the encouragement of flexibility, the empowerment of local managers and the promotion of reflection and accountability enabled this enhancement. Lastly, the literature reviewed revealed five interrelated elements for harnessing PAR to strengthen health managers capacity. These were: a shared purpose, skilled facilitation and social psychological safety, activity integration into organizational procedures, organizational support and supportive external monitoring.

    Conclusions:

    Health managers have a central role in strengthening health systems; hence the formalization of their role, especially within the public-sector, is needed. In addition, significant investments into developing and strengthening their capacity is required. Strengthening the capacity of health managers is an iterative process that draws synergies from different approaches. The process leans on formal trainings as well as more engaging means of learning, such as PAR. As an engaging approach to learning, PAR expands interaction spaces, provides inclusiveness and flexibility, promotes local ingenuity and shared responsibility, and allows for monitoring and learning. PAR had positive effects on the strengthening of the capacity of health managers while at the same time achieving other project outcomes. Participatory approaches are hence relevant for dealing with the complex challenges bedevilling health systems. The approach nonetheless should be applied with a more nuanced appreciation of the challenges when using it and the elements for harnessing it to strengthen health systems.

  • Public defence: 2018-05-18 10:00 MA121, MIT-huset, Umeå
    Anton, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Exponential integrators for stochastic partial differential equations2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) have during the past decades become an important tool for modeling systems which are influenced by randomness. Because of the complex nature of SPDEs, knowledge of efficient numerical methods with good convergence and geometric properties is of considerable importance. Due to this, numerical analysis of SPDEs has become an important and active research field.

    The thesis consists of four papers, all dealing with time integration of different SPDEs using exponential integrators. We analyse exponential integrators for the stochastic wave equation, the stochastic heat equation, and the stochastic Schrödinger equation. Our primary focus is to study strong order of convergence of temporal approximations. However, occasionally, we also analyse space approximations such as finite element and finite difference approximations. In addition to this, for some SPDEs, we consider conservation properties of numerical discretizations.

    As seen in this thesis, exponential integrators for SPDEs have many benefits over more traditional integrators such as Euler-Maruyama schemes or the Crank-Nicolson-Maruyama scheme. They are explicit and therefore very easy to implement and use in practice. Also, they are excellent at handling stiff problems, which naturally arise from spatial discretizations of SPDEs. While many explicit integrators suffer step size restrictions due to stability issues, exponential integrators do not in general.

    In Paper 1 we consider a full discretization of the stochastic wave equation driven by multiplicative noise. We use a finite element method for the spatial discretization, and for the temporal discretization we use a stochastic trigonometric method. In the first part of the paper, we prove mean-square convergence of the full approximation. In the second part, we study the behavior of the total energy, or Hamiltonian, of the wave equation. It is well known that for deterministic (Hamiltonian) wave equations, the total energy remains constant in time. We prove that for stochastic wave equations with additive noise, the expected energy of the exact solution grows linearly with time. We also prove that the numerical approximation produces a small error in this linear drift.

    In the second paper, we study an exponential integrator applied to the time discretization of the stochastic Schrödinger equation with a multiplicative potential. We prove strong convergence order 1 and 1/2 for additive and multiplicative noise, respectively. The deterministic linear Schrödinger equation has several conserved quantities, including the energy, the mass, and the momentum. We first show that for Schrödinger equations driven by additive noise, the expected values of these quantities grow linearly with time. The exponential integrator is shown to preserve these linear drifts for all time in the case of a stochastic Schrödinger equation without potential. For the equation with a multiplicative potential, we obtain a small error in these linear drifts.

    The third paper is devoted to studying a full approximation of the one-dimensional stochastic heat equation. For the spatial discretization we use a finite difference method and an exponential integrator is used for the temporal approximation. We prove mean-square convergence and almost sure convergence of the approximation when the coefficients of the problem are assumed to be Lipschitz continuous. For non-Lipschitz coefficients, we prove convergence in probability.

    In Paper 4 we revisit the stochastic Schrödinger equation. We consider this SPDE with a power-law nonlinearity. This nonlinearity is not globally Lipschitz continuous and the exact solution is not assumed to remain bounded for all times. These difficulties are handled by considering a truncated version of the equation and by working with stopping times and random time intervals. We prove almost sure convergence and convergence in probability for the exponential integrator as well as convergence orders of ½ − 𝜀, for all 𝜀 > 0, and 1/2, respectively.

  • Ablikim, M.
    et al.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Achasov, M. N.
    GI Budker Inst Nucl Phys SB RAS BINP, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia.;Novosibirsk State Univ, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Ahmed, S.
    Helmholtz Inst Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Ai, X. C.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Albayrak, O.
    Carnegie Mellon Univ, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA..
    Albrecht, M.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Ambrose, D. J.
    Univ Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 USA..
    Amoroso, A.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;GSI Helmholtzctr Heavy Ion Res GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt, Germany.;Univ Groningen, KVI CART, NL-9747 AA Groningen, Netherlands.;Liaoning Univ, Shenyang 110036, Liaoning, Peoples R China.;Nanjing Normal Univ, Nanjing 210023, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.;Peking Univ, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China.;Univ Turin, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    An, F. F.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    An, Q.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Bai, J. Z.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Bakina, O.
    Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna 141980, Moscow Region, Russia..
    Ferroli, R. Baldini
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Lab Nazl Frascati, I-00044 Frascati, Italy..
    Ban, Y.
    Peking Univ, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China..
    Bennett, D. W.
    Indiana Univ, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA..
    Bennett, J. V.
    Carnegie Mellon Univ, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA..
    Berger, N.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Bertani, M.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Lab Nazl Frascati, I-00044 Frascati, Italy..
    Bettoni, D.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Ferrara, I-44122 Ferrara, Italy..
    Bian, J. M.
    Univ Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Bianchi, F.
    Univ Turin, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Boger, E.
    Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna 141980, Moscow Region, Russia.;Moscow Inst Phys & Technol, Moscow 141700, Russia..
    Boyko, I.
    Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna 141980, Moscow Region, Russia..
    Briere, R. A.
    Carnegie Mellon Univ, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA..
    Cai, H.
    Wuhan Univ, Wuhan 430072, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Cai, X.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Shanxi Univ, Taiyuan 030006, Shanxi, Peoples R China..
    Cakir, O.
    Ankara Univ, TR-06100 Ankara, Turkey..
    Calcaterra, A.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Lab Nazl Frascati, I-00044 Frascati, Italy.;Univ Turin, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Cao, G. F.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Cetin, S. A.
    Istanbul Bilgi Univ, TR-34060 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Chai, J.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Chang, J. F.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Chelkov, G.
    Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna 141980, Moscow Region, Russia.;Moscow Inst Phys & Technol, Moscow 141700, Russia.;Tomsk State Univ, Funct Elect Lab, Tomsk 634050, Russia..
    Chen, G.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Chen, H. S.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Chen, J. C.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Chen, M. L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Chen, S.
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Chen, S. J.
    Nanjing Univ, Nanjing 210093, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Chen, X.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Chen, X. R.
    Lanzhou Univ, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu, Peoples R China..
    Chen, Y. B.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Chu, X. K.
    Peking Univ, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China..
    Cibinetto, G.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Ferrara, I-44122 Ferrara, Italy..
    Dai, H. L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Dai, J. P.
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Shanghai 200240, Peoples R China.;Moscow Inst Phys & Technol, Moscow 141700, Russia..
    Dbeyssi, A.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Helmholtz Inst Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Dedovich, D.
    Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna 141980, Moscow Region, Russia..
    Deng, Z. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Denig, A.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Denysenko, I.
    Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna 141980, Moscow Region, Russia..
    Destefanis, M.
    Univ Turin, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    De Mori, F.
    Univ Turin, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Ding, Y.
    Liaoning Univ, Shenyang 110036, Liaoning, Peoples R China..
    Dong, C.
    Nankai Univ, Tianjin 300071, Peoples R China..
    Dong, J.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Dong, L. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Dong, M. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Dou, Z. L.
    Nanjing Univ, Nanjing 210093, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Du, S. X.
    Zhengzhou Univ, Zhengzhou 450001, Henan, Peoples R China..
    Duan, P. F.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Fan, J. Z.
    Tsinghua Univ, Beijing 100084, Peoples R China..
    Fang, J.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Fang, S. S.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Fang, X.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Fang, Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Farinelli, R.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Ferrara, I-44122 Ferrara, Italy.;Univ Ferrara, I-44122 Ferrara, Italy..
    Fava, L.
    Univ Piemonte Orientale, I-15121 Alessandria, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Fegan, S.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Feldbauer, F.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Felici, G.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Lab Nazl Frascati, I-00044 Frascati, Italy..
    Feng, C. Q.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Fioravanti, E.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Ferrara, I-44122 Ferrara, Italy..
    Fritsch, M.
    Helmholtz Inst Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.;Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Fu, C. D.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Gao, Q.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Gao, X. L.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Gao, Y.
    Tsinghua Univ, Beijing 100084, Peoples R China..
    Gao, Z.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Garzia, I.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Sez Ferrara, I-44122 Ferrara, Italy..
    Goetzen, K.
    GSI Helmholtzctr Heavy Ion Res GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt, Germany..
    Gong, L.
    Nankai Univ, Tianjin 300071, Peoples R China..
    Gong, W. X.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Gradl, W.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Greco, M.
    Univ Turin, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Gu, M. H.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Gu, Y. T.
    Guangxi Univ, Nanning 530004, Peoples R China..
    Guan, Y. H.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Guo, A. Q.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Guo, L. B.
    Nanjing Normal Univ, Nanjing 210023, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Guo, R. P.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Guo, Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Guo, Y. P.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Haddadi, Z.
    Univ Groningen, KVI CART, NL-9747 AA Groningen, Netherlands..
    Hafner, A.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Han, S.
    Wuhan Univ, Wuhan 430072, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Hao, X. Q.
    Henan Normal Univ, Xinxiang 453007, Peoples R China..
    Harris, F. A.
    Univ Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA..
    He, K. L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Heinsius, F. H.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Held, T.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Heng, Y. K.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Holtmann, T.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Hou, Z. L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Hu, C.
    Nanjing Normal Univ, Nanjing 210023, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Hu, H. M.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Hu, T.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Hu, Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Huang, G. S.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Huang, J. S.
    Henan Normal Univ, Xinxiang 453007, Peoples R China..
    Huang, X. T.
    Shandong Univ, Jinan 250100, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Huang, X. Z.
    Nanjing Univ, Nanjing 210093, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Huang, Z. L.
    Liaoning Univ, Shenyang 110036, Liaoning, Peoples R China..
    Hussain, T.
    Univ Punjab, Lahore 54590, Pakistan..
    Andersson, Walter Ikegami
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Ji, Q.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Ji, Q. P.
    Henan Normal Univ, Xinxiang 453007, Peoples R China..
    Ji, X. B.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Ji, X. L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Jiang, L. W.
    Wuhan Univ, Wuhan 430072, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Jiang, X. S.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Jiang, X. Y.
    Nankai Univ, Tianjin 300071, Peoples R China..
    Jiao, J. B.
    Shandong Univ, Jinan 250100, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Jiao, Z.
    Huangshan Coll, Huangshan 245000, Peoples R China..
    Jin, D. P.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Jin, S.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Johansson, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Julin, A.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.
    Univ Groningen, KVI CART, NL-9747 AA Groningen, Netherlands..
    Kang, X. L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Kang, X. S.
    Nankai Univ, Tianjin 300071, Peoples R China..
    Kavatsyuk, M.
    Univ Groningen, KVI CART, NL-9747 AA Groningen, Netherlands..
    Ke, B. C.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Carnegie Mellon Univ, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA..
    Kiese, P.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Kliemt, R.
    GSI Helmholtzctr Heavy Ion Res GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt, Germany..
    Kloss, B.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Kolcu, O. B.
    Istanbul Bilgi Univ, TR-34060 Istanbul, Turkey.;Istanbul Arel Univ, TR-34295 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Kopf, B.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Ruhr Univ Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Kornicer, M.
    Univ Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA..
    Kupsc, Andrzej
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics. Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.
    Kuehn, W.
    Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Inst Phys 2, Heinrich Buff Ring 16, D-35392 Giessen, Germany..
    Lange, J. S.
    Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Inst Phys 2, Heinrich Buff Ring 16, D-35392 Giessen, Germany..
    Lara, M.
    Indiana Univ, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA..
    Larin, P.
    Helmholtz Inst Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Leithoff, H.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Leng, C.
    Li, Cui
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Li, Cheng
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Li, D. M.
    Zhengzhou Univ, Zhengzhou 450001, Henan, Peoples R China..
    Li, F.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Li, F. Y.
    Peking Univ, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China..
    Li, G.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Li, H. B.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Li, H. J.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Li, J. C.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Li, Jin
    Seoul Natl Univ, Seoul 151747, South Korea..
    Li, K.
    Hangzhou Normal Univ, Hangzhou 310036, Zhejiang, Peoples R China.;Shandong Univ, Jinan 250100, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Li, Lei
    Beijing Inst Petrochem Technol, Beijing 102617, Peoples R China..
    Li, P. L.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Li, P. R.
    China Ctr Adv Sci & Technol, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Li, Q. Y.
    Shandong Univ, Jinan 250100, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Li, T.
    Shandong Univ, Jinan 250100, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Li, W. D.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Li, W. G.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Li, X. L.
    Shandong Univ, Jinan 250100, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Li, X. N.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Li, X. Q.
    Nankai Univ, Tianjin 300071, Peoples R China..
    Li, Y. B.
    Beihang Univ, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Li, Z. B.
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Guangzhou 510275, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Liang, H.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Liang, Y. F.
    Sichuan Univ, Chengdu 610064, Sichuan, Peoples R China..
    Liang, Y. T.
    Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Inst Phys 2, Heinrich Buff Ring 16, D-35392 Giessen, Germany..
    Liao, G. R.
    Guangxi Normal Univ, Guilin 541004, Peoples R China..
    Lin, D. X.
    Helmholtz Inst Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Liu, B.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Shanghai 200240, Peoples R China.;Shanghai Key Lab Particle Phys & Cosmol, Key Lab Particle Phys Astrophys & Cosmol, Minist Educ, Inst Nucl & Particle Phys, Shanghai 200240, Peoples R China..
    Liu, B. J.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Liu, C. X.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Liu, D.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Liu, F. H.
    Shanxi Univ, Taiyuan 030006, Shanxi, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Fang
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Feng
    Cent China Normal Univ, Wuhan 430079, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Liu, H. B.
    Guangxi Univ, Nanning 530004, Peoples R China..
    Liu, H. H.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Henan Univ Sci & Technol, Luoyang 471003, Peoples R China..
    Liu, H. M.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Liu, J.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Liu, J. B.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Liu, J. P.
    Wuhan Univ, Wuhan 430072, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Liu, J. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Liu, K.
    Tsinghua Univ, Beijing 100084, Peoples R China..
    Liu, K. Y.
    Liaoning Univ, Shenyang 110036, Liaoning, Peoples R China..
    Liu, L. D.
    Peking Univ, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China..
    Liu, P. L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Q.
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Liu, S. B.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Liu, X.
    Lanzhou Univ, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Y. B.
    Nankai Univ, Tianjin 300071, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Y. Y.
    Nankai Univ, Tianjin 300071, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Z. A.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Zhiqing
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Loehner, H.
    Univ Groningen, KVI CART, NL-9747 AA Groningen, Netherlands..
    Long, Y. F.
    Peking Univ, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China..
    Lou, X. C.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Lu, H. J.
    Huangshan Coll, Huangshan 245000, Peoples R China..
    Lu, J. G.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Lu, Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Lu, Y. P.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Luo, C. L.
    Nanjing Normal Univ, Nanjing 210023, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Luo, M. X.
    Zhejiang Univ, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang, Peoples R China..
    Luo, T.
    Univ Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA..
    Luo, X. L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Lyu, X. R.
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Ma, F. C.
    Liaoning Univ, Shenyang 110036, Liaoning, Peoples R China..
    Ma, H. L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Ma, L. L.
    Shandong Univ, Jinan 250100, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Ma, M. M.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Ma, Q. M.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Ma, T.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Ma, X. N.
    Nankai Univ, Tianjin 300071, Peoples R China..
    Ma, X. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Ma, Y. M.
    Shandong Univ, Jinan 250100, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Maas, F. E.
    Helmholtz Inst Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Maggiora, M.
    Univ Turin, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Malik, Q. A.
    Univ Punjab, Lahore 54590, Pakistan..
    Mao, Y. J.
    Peking Univ, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China..
    Mao, Z. P.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Marcello, S.
    Univ Turin, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Messchendorp, J. G.
    Univ Groningen, KVI CART, NL-9747 AA Groningen, Netherlands..
    Mezzadri, G.
    Univ Ferrara, I-44122 Ferrara, Italy..
    Min, J.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Min, T. J.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Mitchell, R. E.
    Indiana Univ, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA..
    Mo, X. H.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Mo, Y. J.
    Cent China Normal Univ, Wuhan 430079, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Morales, C. Morales
    Helmholtz Inst Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Morello, G.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Lab Nazl Frascati, I-00044 Frascati, Italy..
    Muchnoi, N. Yu.
    GI Budker Inst Nucl Phys SB RAS BINP, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia.;Novosibirsk State Univ, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Muramatsu, H.
    Univ Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Musiol, P.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Nefedov, Y.
    Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna 141980, Moscow Region, Russia..
    Nerling, F.
    GSI Helmholtzctr Heavy Ion Res GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt, Germany..
    Nikolaev, I. B.
    GI Budker Inst Nucl Phys SB RAS BINP, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia.;Novosibirsk State Univ, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia..
    Ning, Z.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Nisar, S.
    COMSATS Inst Informat Technol, Def Rd,Off Raiwind Rd, Lahore 54000, Pakistan..
    Niu, S. L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Niu, X. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Olsen, S. L.
    Seoul Natl Univ, Seoul 151747, South Korea..
    Ouyang, Q.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Pacetti, S.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, I-06100 Perugia, Italy.;Univ Perugia, I-06100 Perugia, Italy..
    Pan, Y.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Papenbrock, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics. Uppsala Univ, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Patteri, P.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Lab Nazl Frascati, I-00044 Frascati, Italy..
    Pelizaeus, M.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Peng, H. P.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Peters, K.
    GSI Helmholtzctr Heavy Ion Res GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt, Germany.;Goethe Univ Frankfurt, D-60323 Frankfurt, Germany..
    Pettersson, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Ping, J. L.
    Nanjing Normal Univ, Nanjing 210023, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Ping, R. G.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Poling, R.
    Univ Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Prasad, V.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Qi, H. R.
    Beihang Univ, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Qi, M.
    Nanjing Univ, Nanjing 210093, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Qian, S.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Qiao, C. F.
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Qin, L. Q.
    Shandong Univ, Jinan 250100, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Qin, N.
    Wuhan Univ, Wuhan 430072, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Qin, X. S.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Qin, Z. H.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Qiu, J. F.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Rashid, K. H.
    Univ Punjab, Lahore 54590, Pakistan.;Govt Coll Women Univ, Sialkot 51310, Punjab, Pakistan..
    Redmer, C. F.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Ripka, M.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Rong, G.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Rosner, Ch.
    Helmholtz Inst Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Ruan, X. D.
    Guangxi Univ, Nanning 530004, Peoples R China..
    Sarantsev, A.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna 141980, Moscow Region, Russia.;NRC Kurchatov Inst, PNPI, Gatchina 188300, Russia..
    Savrie, M.
    Univ Ferrara, I-44122 Ferrara, Italy..
    Schnier, C.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Schönning, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Shan, W.
    Peking Univ, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China..
    Shao, M.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Shen, C. P.
    Beihang Univ, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Shen, P. X.
    Nankai Univ, Tianjin 300071, Peoples R China..
    Shen, X. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Sheng, H. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Song, W. M.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Song, X. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Sosio, S.
    Univ Turin, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Spataro, S.
    Univ Turin, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Sun, G. X.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Sun, J. F.
    Henan Normal Univ, Xinxiang 453007, Peoples R China..
    Sun, S. S.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Sun, X. H.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Y. J.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Y. Z.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Z. J.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Z. T.
    Indiana Univ, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA..
    Tang, C. J.
    Sichuan Univ, Chengdu 610064, Sichuan, Peoples R China..
    Tang, X.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Tapan, I.
    Uludag Univ, TR-16059 Bursa, Turkey..
    Thorndike, E. H.
    Univ Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 USA..
    Tiemens, M.
    Univ Groningen, KVI CART, NL-9747 AA Groningen, Netherlands..
    Uman, I.
    Near East Univ, Mersin 10, North Cyprus, Turkey..
    Varner, G. S.
    Univ Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA..
    Wang, B.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Nankai Univ, Tianjin 300071, Peoples R China..
    Wang, B. L.
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Wang, D.
    Peking Univ, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China..
    Wang, D. Y.
    Peking Univ, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China..
    Wang, K.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Wang, L. L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Wang, L. S.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Wang, M.
    Shandong Univ, Jinan 250100, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Wang, P.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Wang, P. L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Wang, W.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Wang, W. P.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Wang, X. F.
    Tsinghua Univ, Beijing 100084, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Y.
    Soochow Univ, Suzhou 215006, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Y. D.
    Helmholtz Inst Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Wang, Y. F.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Y. Q.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Wang, Z.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Z. G.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Z. H.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Z. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Zongyuan
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Weber, T.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Wei, D. H.
    Guangxi Normal Univ, Guilin 541004, Peoples R China..
    Weidenkaff, P.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Wen, S. P.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Wiedner, U.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Wolke, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Wu, L. H.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Wu, L. J.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Wu, Z.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Xia, L.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Xia, L. G.
    Tsinghua Univ, Beijing 100084, Peoples R China..
    Xia, Y.
    Hunan Univ, Changsha 410082, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Xiao, D.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Xiao, H.
    Univ South China, Hengyang 421001, Peoples R China..
    Xiao, Z. J.
    Nanjing Normal Univ, Nanjing 210023, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Xie, Y. G.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Xie, Y. H.
    Cent China Normal Univ, Wuhan 430079, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Xiu, Q. L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Xu, G. F.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Xu, J. J.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Xu, L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Xu, Q. J.
    Hangzhou Normal Univ, Hangzhou 310036, Zhejiang, Peoples R China..
    Xu, Q. N.
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Xu, X. P.
    Soochow Univ, Suzhou 215006, Peoples R China..
    Yan, L.
    Univ Turin, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Yan, W. B.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Yan, W. C.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Yan, Y. H.
    Hunan Univ, Changsha 410082, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Yang, H. J.
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Shanghai 200240, Peoples R China.;Moscow Inst Phys & Technol, Moscow 141700, Russia..
    Yang, H. X.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Yang, L.
    Wuhan Univ, Wuhan 430072, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Yang, Y. X.
    Guangxi Normal Univ, Guilin 541004, Peoples R China..
    Ye, M.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Ye, M. H.
    China Ctr Adv Sci & Technol, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China..
    Yin, J. H.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    You, Z. Y.
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Guangzhou 510275, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Yu, B. X.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Yu, C. X.
    Nankai Univ, Tianjin 300071, Peoples R China..
    Yu, J. S.
    Lanzhou Univ, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu, Peoples R China..
    Yuan, C. Z.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Yuan, Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Yuncu, A.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Istanbul Bilgi Univ, TR-34060 Istanbul, Turkey.;Bogazici Univ, TR-34342 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Zafar, A. A.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Punjab, Lahore 54590, Pakistan..
    Zeng, Y.
    Hunan Univ, Changsha 410082, Hunan, Peoples R China..
    Zeng, Z.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, B. X.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, B. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, C. C.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, D. H.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, H. H.
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Guangzhou 510275, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, H. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, J.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, J. J.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, J. L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, J. Q.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, J. W.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, J. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, J. Z.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, K.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, S. Q.
    Nankai Univ, Tianjin 300071, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, X. Y.
    Shandong Univ, Jinan 250100, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Y. H.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Y. N.
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Y. T.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Yu
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Z. H.
    Cent China Normal Univ, Wuhan 430079, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Z. P.
    Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Z. Y.
    Wuhan Univ, Wuhan 430072, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, G.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, J. W.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, J. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, J. Z.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, Lei
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, Ling
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, M. G.
    Nankai Univ, Tianjin 300071, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, Q.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, Q. W.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, S. J.
    Zhengzhou Univ, Zhengzhou 450001, Henan, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, T. C.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, Y. B.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, Z. G.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Zhemchugov, A.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Joint Inst Nucl Res, Dubna 141980, Moscow Region, Russia.;Moscow Inst Phys & Technol, Moscow 141700, Russia..
    Zheng, B.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Helmholtz Inst Mainz, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55099 Mainz, Germany.;Univ South China, Hengyang 421001, Peoples R China..
    Zheng, J. P.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Zheng, W. J.
    Shandong Univ, Jinan 250100, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Zheng, Y. H.
    Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhong, B.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Nanjing Normal Univ, Nanjing 210023, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Zhou, L.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Zhou, X.
    Wuhan Univ, Wuhan 430072, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Zhou, X. K.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Zhou, X. R.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Zhou, X. Y.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhu, K.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhu, K. J.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhu, S.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhu, S. H.
    Univ Sci & Technol Liaoning, Anshan 114051, Peoples R China..
    Zhu, X. L.
    Tsinghua Univ, Beijing 100084, Peoples R China..
    Zhu, Y. C.
    State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China.;Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Zhu, Y. S.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhu, Z. A.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhuang, J.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China.;State Key Lab Particle Detect & Elect, Beijing 100049, Hefei, Peoples R China..
    Zotti, L.
    Univ Turin, I-10125 Turin, Italy.;Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, I-10125 Turin, Italy..
    Zou, B. S.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zou, J. H.
    Inst High Energy Phys, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Observation of a cross-section enhancement near mass threshold in e(+)e(-) -> Lambda(Lambda)over-bar2018In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 97, no 3, article id 032013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The process e(+)e(-) -> Lambda(Lambda) over bar is studied using data samples at root s = 2.2324, 2.400, 2.800 and 3.080 GeV collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII collider. The Born cross section is measured at root s = 2.2324 GeV, which is 1.0 MeVabove the Lambda(Lambda) over bar mass threshold, to be 305 +/- 45(-36)(+66) pb, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The cross section near threshold is larger than that expected from theory, which predicts the cross section to vanish at threshold. The Born cross sections at root s = 2.400, 2.800 and 3.080 GeV are measured and found to be consistent with previous experimental results, but with improved precision. Finally, the corresponding effective electromagnetic form factors of Lambda are deduced.

  • Johansson, Jacob
    et al.
    Brännström, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics. Evolution and Ecology Program, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria.
    Metz, Johan A. J.
    Dieckmann, Ulf
    Twelve fundamental life histories evolving through allocation-dependent fecundity and survival2018In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 3172-3186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An organism's life history is closely interlinked with its allocation of energy between growth and reproduction at different life stages. Theoretical models have established that diminishing returns from reproductive investment promote strategies with simultaneous investment into growth and reproduction (indeterminate growth) over strategies with distinct phases of growth and reproduction (determinate growth). We extend this traditional, binary classification by showing that allocation-dependent fecundity and mortality rates allow for a large diversity of optimal allocation schedules. By analyzing a model of organisms that allocate energy between growth and reproduction, we find twelve types of optimal allocation schedules, differing qualitatively in how reproductive allocation increases with body mass. These twelve optimal allocation schedules include types with different combinations of continuous and discontinuous increase in reproduction allocation, in which phases of continuous increase can be decelerating or accelerating. We furthermore investigate how this variation influences growth curves and the expected maximum life span and body size. Our study thus reveals new links between eco-physiological constraints and life-history evolution and underscores how allocation-dependent fitness components may underlie biological diversity.

  • Forslund, Josefin M. E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Pfeiffer, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Stojkovič, Gorazd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wanrooij, Pauline H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wanrooij, Sjoerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The presence of rNTPs decreases the speed of mitochondrial DNA replication2018In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 14, no 3, article id e1007315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ribonucleotides (rNMPs) are frequently incorporated during replication or repair by DNA polymerases and failure to remove them leads to instability of nuclear DNA (nDNA). Conversely, rNMPs appear to be relatively well-tolerated in mitochondnal DNA (mtDNA), although the mechanisms behind the tolerance remain unclear. We here show that the human mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (Pol gamma) bypasses single rNMPs with an unprecedentedly high fidelity and efficiency. In addition, Pol gamma exhibits a strikingly low frequency of rNMP incorporation, a property, which we find is independent of its exonuclease activity. However, the physiological levels of free rNTPs partially inhibit DNA synthesis by Pol gamma and render the polymerase more sensitive to imbalanced dNTP pools. The characteristics of Pol gamma reported here could have implications for forms of rntDNA depletion syndrome (MDS) that are associated with imbalanced cellular dNTP pools. Our results show that at the rNTPidNIP ratios that are expected to prevail in such disease states, Pol gamma enters a polymerasetexonuclease idling mode that leads to mtDNA replication stalling. This could ultimately lead to mtDNA depletion and, consequently, to mitochondrial disease phenotypes such as those observed in MDS.

  • Nedelcu, Robert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Olsson, Pontus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Nyström, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction.
    Thor, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Finish line distinctness and accuracy in 7 intraoral scanners versus conventional impression: an in vitro descriptive comparison2018In: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 18, article id 27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several studies have evaluated accuracy of intraoral scanners (IOS), but data is lacking regarding variations between IOS systems in the depiction of the critical finish line and the finish line accuracy. The aim of this study was to analyze the level of finish line distinctness (FLD), and finish line accuracy (FLA), in 7 intraoral scanners (IOS) and one conventional impression (IMPR). Furthermore, to assess parameters of resolution, tessellation, topography, and color. Methods: A dental model with a crown preparation including supra and subgingival finish line was reference-scanned with an industrial scanner (ATOS), and scanned with seven IOS: 3M, CS3500 and CS3600, DWIO, Omnicam, Planscan and Trios. An IMPR was taken and poured, and the model was scanned with a laboratory scanner. The ATOS scan was cropped at finish line and best-fit aligned for 3D Compare Analysis (Geomagic). Accuracy was visualized, and descriptive analysis was performed. Results: All IOS, except Planscan, had comparable overall accuracy, however, FLD and FLA varied substantially. Trios presented the highest FLD, and with CS3600, the highest FLA. 3M, and DWIO had low overall FLD and low FLA in subgingival areas, whilst Planscan had overall low FLD and FLA, as well as lower general accuracy. IMPR presented high FLD, except in subgingival areas, and high FLA. Trios had the highest resolution by factor 1.6 to 3.1 among IOS, followed by IMPR, DWIO, Omnicam, CS3500, 3M, CS3600 and Planscan. Tessellation was found to be non-uniform except in 3M and DWIO. Topographic variation was found for 3M and Trios, with deviations below +/-25 mu m for Trios. Inclusion of color enhanced the identification of the finish line in Trios, Omnicam and CS3600, but not in Planscan. Conclusions: There were sizeable variations between IOS with both higher and lower FLD and FLA than IMPR. High FLD was more related to high localized finish line resolution and non-uniform tessellation, than to high overall resolution. Topography variations were low. Color improved finish line identification in some IOS. It is imperative that clinicians critically evaluate the digital impression, being aware of varying technical limitations among IOS, in particular when challenging subgingival conditions apply.

  • Bessarab, Pavel F.
    et al.
    Univ Iceland, Sci Inst, IS-107 Reykjavik, Iceland.;ITMO Univ, St Petersburg 197101, Russia..
    Müller, Gideon P.
    Univ Iceland, Sci Inst, IS-107 Reykjavik, Iceland.;Forschungszentrum Julich, Peter Grunberg Inst, D-52425 Julich, Germany.;Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Adv Simulat, D-52425 Julich, Germany.;JARA, D-52425 Julich, Germany..
    Lobanov, Igor S.
    ITMO Univ, St Petersburg 197101, Russia..
    Rybakov, Filipp N.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Phys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kiselev, Nikolai S.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Peter Grunberg Inst, D-52425 Julich, Germany.;Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Adv Simulat, D-52425 Julich, Germany.;JARA, D-52425 Julich, Germany..
    Jonsson, Hannes
    Univ Iceland, Sci Inst, IS-107 Reykjavik, Iceland.;Aalto Univ, FI-00076 Espoo, Finland..
    Uzdin, Valery M.
    ITMO Univ, St Petersburg 197101, Russia.;St Petersburg State Univ, Dept Phys, St Petersburg 198504, Russia.;ITMO Univ, St Petersburg 197101, Russia..
    Blügel, Stefan
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Peter Grunberg Inst, D-52425 Julich, Germany.;Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Adv Simulat, D-52425 Julich, Germany.;JARA, D-52425 Julich, Germany..
    Bergqvist, Lars
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci, Dept Appl Phys, Electrum 229, SE-16440 Kista, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, SeRC Swedish E Sci Res Ctr, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Delin, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci, Dept Appl Phys, Electrum 229, SE-16440 Kista, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, SeRC Swedish E Sci Res Ctr, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lifetime of racetrack skyrmions2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 3433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The skyrmion racetrack is a promising concept for future information technology. There, binary bits are carried by nanoscale spin swirls-skyrmions-driven along magnetic strips. Stability of the skyrmions is a critical issue for realising this technology. Here we demonstrate that the racetrack skyrmion lifetime can be calculated from first principles as a function of temperature, magnetic field and track width. Our method combines harmonic transition state theory extended to include Goldstone modes, with an atomistic spin Hamiltonian parametrized from density functional theory calculations. We demonstrate that two annihilation mechanisms contribute to the skyrmion stability: At low external magnetic field, escape through the track boundary prevails, but a crossover field exists, above which the collapse in the interior becomes dominant. Considering a Pd/Fe bilayer on an Ir(111) substrate as a well-established model system, the calculated skyrmion lifetime is found to be consistent with reported experimental measurements. Our simulations also show that the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor of escape depends only weakly on the external magnetic field, whereas the pre-exponential factor for collapse is strongly field dependent. Our results open the door for predictive simulations, free from empirical parameters, to aid the design of skyrmion-based information technology.

  • Bychkov, Dmitrii
    et al.
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki Inst Life Sci HiLIFE, Helsinki, Finland..
    Linder, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki Inst Life Sci HiLIFE, Helsinki, Finland..
    Turkki, Riku
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki Inst Life Sci HiLIFE, Helsinki, Finland..
    Nordling, Stig
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Pathol, Med, Helsinki, Finland..
    Kovanen, Panu E.
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Pathol, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Hosp, HUSLAB, Helsinki, Finland..
    Verrill, Clare
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Surg Sci, NIHR Oxford Biomed Res Ctr, Oxford, England..
    Walliander, Margarita
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki Inst Life Sci HiLIFE, Helsinki, Finland..
    Lundin, Mikael
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki Inst Life Sci HiLIFE, Helsinki, Finland..
    Haglund, Caj
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Surg, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Res Programs Unit, Translat Canc Biol, Helsinki, Finland..
    Lundin, Johan
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland FIMM, Helsinki Inst Life Sci HiLIFE, Helsinki, Finland.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Global Hlth IHCAR, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Deep learning based tissue analysis predicts outcome in colorectal cancer2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 3395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Image-based machine learning and deep learning in particular has recently shown expert-level accuracy in medical image classification. In this study, we combine convolutional and recurrent architectures to train a deep network to predict colorectal cancer outcome based on images of tumour tissue samples. The novelty of our approach is that we directly predict patient outcome, without any intermediate tissue classification. We evaluate a set of digitized haematoxylin-eosin-stained tumour tissue microarray (TMA) samples from 420 colorectal cancer patients with clinicopathological and outcome data available. The results show that deep learning-based outcome prediction with only small tissue areas as input outperforms (hazard ratio 2.3; CI 95% 1.79-3.03; AUC 0.69) visual histological assessment performed by human experts on both TMA spot (HR 1.67; CI 95% 1.28-2.19; AUC 0.58) and whole-slide level (HR 1.65; CI 95% 1.30-2.15; AUC 0.57) in the stratification into low-and high-risk patients. Our results suggest that state-of-the-art deep learning techniques can extract more prognostic information from the tissue morphology of colorectal cancer than an experienced human observer.

  • Leyser, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    James, H. Gordon
    Univ Calgary, Dept Phys & Astron, Calgary, AB, Canada..
    Gustavsson, Björn
    UiT Arct Univ Norway, Dept Phys & Technol, Tromso, Norway..
    Rietveld, Michael T.
    EISCAT Sci Assoc, Ramfjordbotn, Norway..
    Evidence of L - mode electromagnetic wave pumping of ionospheric plasma near geomagnetic zenith2018In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 243-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The response of ionospheric plasma to pumping by powerful HF (high frequency) electromagnetic waves transmitted from the ground into the ionosphere is the strongest in the direction of geomagnetic zenith. We present experimental results from transmitting a left-handed circularly polarized HF beam from the EISCAT (European Incoherent SCATter association) Heating facility in magnetic zenith. The CASSIOPE (CAScade, Smallsat and IOnospheric Polar Explorer) spacecraft in the topside ionosphere above the F-region density peak detected transionospheric pump radiation, although the pump frequency was below the maximum ionospheric plasma frequency. The pump wave is deduced to arrive at CASSIOPE through L -mode propagation and associated double (O to Z, Z to O) conversion in pump-induced radio windows. L -mode propagation allows the pump wave to reach higher plasma densities and higher ionospheric altitudes than O -mode propagation so that a pump wave in the L -mode can facilitate excitation of upper hybrid phenomena localized in density depletions in a larger altitude range. L -mode propagation is therefore suggested to be important in explaining the magnetic zenith effect.

  • Simonov, Konstantin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics. Lund Univ, MAX Lab 4, Box 118, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.;St Petersburg State Univ, VA Fock Inst Phys, St Petersburg 198504, Russia..
    Generalov, A. V.
    Lund Univ, MAX Lab 4, Box 118, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Vinogradov, A. S.
    St Petersburg State Univ, VA Fock Inst Phys, St Petersburg 198504, Russia..
    Svirskiy, G. I.
    St Petersburg State Univ, VA Fock Inst Phys, St Petersburg 198504, Russia..
    Cafolla, A. A.
    Dublin City Univ, Sch Phys Sci, Dublin D09, Ireland..
    McGuinness, C.
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Sch Phys, Coll Green, Dublin D02, Ireland..
    Taketsugu, T.
    Hokkaido Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Chem, Sapporo, Hokkaido 0600810, Japan.;NIMS, Global Res Ctr Environm & Energy Based Nanomat Sc, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044, Japan..
    Lyalin, A.
    NIMS, Global Res Ctr Environm & Energy Based Nanomat Sc, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044, Japan..
    Mårtensson, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Preobrajenski, A. B.
    Lund Univ, MAX Lab 4, Box 118, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Synthesis of armchair graphene nanoribbons from the 10,10 '-dibromo-9,9 '-bianthracene molecules on Ag(111): the role of organometallic intermediates2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 3506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the bottom-up growth of N = 7 armchair graphene nanoribbons (7-AGNRs) from the 10,10'-dibromo-9,9'-bianthracene (DBBA) molecules on Ag(111) with the focus on the role of the organometallic (OM) intermediates. It is demonstrated that DBBA molecules on Ag(111) are partially debrominated at room temperature and lose all bromine atoms at elevated temperatures. Similar to DBBA on Cu(111), debrominated molecules form OM chains on Ag(111). Nevertheless, in contrast with the Cu(111) substrate, formation of polyanthracene chains from OM intermediates via an Ullmann-type reaction is feasible on Ag(111). Cleavage of C-Ag bonds occurs before the thermal threshold for the surface-catalyzed activation of C-H bonds on Ag(111) is reached, while on Cu(111) activation of C-H bonds occurs in parallel with the cleavage of the stronger C-Cu bonds. Consequently, while OM intermediates obstruct the Ullmann reaction between DBBA molecules on the Cu(111) substrate, they are required for the formation of polyanthracene chains on Ag(111). If the Ullmann-type reaction on Ag(111) is inhibited, heating of the OM chains produces nanographenes instead. Heating of the polyanthracene chains produces 7-AGNRs, while heating of nanographenes causes the formation of the disordered structures with the possible admixture of short GNRs.

  • Eldvik, Berit
    Möte med mode: folkliga kläder 1750–1900i nordiska museet2014Book (Other academic)
  • Tschan, Georg F.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Environment.
    Invasiva arter och transportinfrastruktur: en internationell kunskapsöversikt med fokus på vägar och växter2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the introduction of a new EU regulation in 2015 all member states have to take action against invasive alien species (IAS). Since the transport sector contributes heavily to IAS spread and establishment, it needs dedicated research and action plans. This report reviews the international literature on IAS within transport-related environments, identifies national research needs in Sweden and recommends strategies for successful countermeasures against IAS. The basic terminology and principles of invasion biology are explained, followed by an extensive review of dispersal via terrestrial transportation networks. Motor vehicles were found to be a significant contributor to long-distance dispersal and the spread of alien and invasive species. However, widely varying methods, scope and study localities of previously published studies make direct comparisons difficult. New, empirical and more systematic studies are needed to investigate the spread of IAS via the transportation network. To illustrate the need for an individual evaluation, three example species are presented in detail (Heracleum mantegazzianum, Lupinus polyphyllus, Ambrosia artemisiifolia), and other problematic groups are discussed. Available tools and information systems that can be used for documentation and control are presented. It is imperative that alien and not only already invasive species are considered. Furthermore, a national blacklist should be created which is regularly updated, and the inclusion of specialists as well as the general public is needed to counteract the negative consequences of IAS.

  • Orru, Hans
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Idavain, Jane
    Pindus, Mihkel
    Orru, Kati
    Kesanurm, Kaisa
    Lang, Aavo
    Tomasova, Jelena
    Residents' Self-Reported Health Effects and Annoyance in Relation to Air Pollution Exposure in an Industrial Area in Eastern-Estonia2018In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 2, article id 252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eastern Estonia has large oil shale mines and industrial facilities mainly focused on electricity generation from oil shale and shale oil extraction, which produce high air pollution emissions. The "Study of the health impact of the oil shale sector-SOHOS" was aimed at identifying the impacts on residents' health and annoyance due to the industrial processing. First, a population-wide survey about health effects and annoyance was carried out. Second, the total and oil shale sectors' emitted concentrations of benzene, phenol, and PM2.5 were modelled. Third, the differences between groups were tested and relationships between health effects and environmental pollution studied using multiple regression analysis. Compared to the control groups from non-industrial areas in Tartu or Laane-Viru, residents of Ida-Viru more frequently (p < 0.05) reported wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, asthma attacks, a long-term cough, hypertension, heart diseases, myocardial infarction, stroke, and diabetes. All health effects except asthma were reported more frequently among non-Estonians. People living in regions with higher levels of PM2.5, had significantly higher odds (p < 0.05) of experiencing chest tightness (OR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.02-1.26), shortness of breath (1.16, 1.03-1.31) or an asthma attack (1.22, 1.04-1.42) during the previous year. People living in regions with higher levels of benzene had higher odds of experiencing myocardial infarction (1.98, 1.11-3.53) and with higher levels of phenol chest tightness (1.44, 1.03-2.00), long-term cough (1.48, 1.06-2.07) and myocardial infarction (2.17, 1.23-3.83). The prevalence of adverse health effects was also higher among those who had been working in the oil shale sector. Next to direct health effects, up to a quarter of the residents of Ida-Viru County were highly annoyed about air pollution. Perceived health risk from air pollution increased the odds of being annoyed. Annoyed people in Ida-Viru had significantly higher odds of experiencing respiratory symptoms during the last 12 months, e.g., wheezing (2.30, 1.31-4.04), chest tightness (2.88, 1.91-4.33 or attack of coughing (1.99, 1.34-2.95).

  • Eriksson, Lars Douglas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Kris, alienation och autenticitet i Lev Sestovs filosofi2017Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study of Lev Shestov, the biographical method is used to explain his philosophy. The grave crisis or nervous breakdown Shestov went through caused a total transformation of his - convictions and values. It was probably this drama that led to his repudiation of the common life and traditional philosophy with its emphasis on reason, knowledge, and ethics in favour of an extreme individualism and religious transcendence.

    The aim of the dissertation is to examine, amongst the great number of philosophers and writers Shestov analysed, mainly those in his view “marginal thinkers”, who were of the greatest interest to him – Fyodor Dostoevsky, Lev Tolstoy, Friedrich Nietzsche, Martin Luther, and Søren Kierkegaard. On the basis of this analysis the character of Shestov’s philosophy is defined.

    According to Shestov, like his own crisis, the crises that these thinkers experienced occasioned a total transformation of their convictions and values. Šestov does not let his life find complete expression in his philosophy. Instead he projects his crisis into the five thinkers’ crises and philosophy.

    To characterize the previous and new modes of thinking, the concepts of alienation (degeneration, degradation, depravity) and authenticity (deliverance from alienation) are used. Shestov’s judgment of the consistency of the five thinkers’ new attitudes is presented, i.e. deliverance from the common life with its emphasis on rational eternal truths and moralism. Authentic life is in Shestov’s opinion the from the individual’s everyday life concealed experience of despair in extreme situations. This constitutes a grave crisis that leads to the repudiation of all hitherto held convictions and cherished hopes.

    The contrast between the Russian philosopher’s personal, (after his crisis) mainly tranquil, harmonious life and his philosophy is glaring.

    Analyzing the five thinkers, Shestov finds that they did not persevere with their new convictions, instead they complied with the by everybody accepted and everywhere valid truths. Shestov’s “theoretical”, uncompromising and consistent stance on one side and the lack of these characteristics with the aforementioned thinkers on the other side, to a great extent places Shestov in another category than these.

    In Shestov’s view freedom is in the region of tragedy, which nobody enters on his own will and in the incomprehensible trust in a capricious, “inhuman” God. According to Shestov, only the philosopher, who derives his thinking from a situation, where he experiences extreme despair and hopelessness, can claim to be a true philosopher.

  • Ryberg, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Nilsson, R. Henrik
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 463, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Gothenburg Global Biodivers Ctr, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    New light on names and naming of dark taxa2018In: MycoKeys, ISSN 1314-4057, E-ISSN 1314-4049, no 30, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing proportion of fungal species and lineages are known only from sequence data and cannot be linked to any physical specimen or resolved taxonomic name. Such fungi are often referred to as "dark taxa" or "dark matter fungi". As they lack a taxonomic identity in the form of a name, they are regularly ignored in many important contexts, for example in legalisation and species counts. It is therefore very urgent to find a system to also deal with these fungi. Here, issues relating to the taxonomy and nomenclature of dark taxa are discussed and a number of questions that the mycological community needs to consider before deciding on what system/s to implement are highlighted.

  • Public defence: 2018-05-18 09:15 B21, Biomedicinskt centrum (BMC), Uppsala
    Gustafsson, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Translational Aspects of Blood-Brain Barrier Transport and Brain Distribution of Drugs in Health and Disease2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A high unmet medical need in the area of CNS diseases coincides with high failure rates in CNS drug development. Efficient treatment of CNS disease is constrained by limited entrance of drugs into the brain owing to the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which separates brain from blood. Insufficient inter-species translation and lack of methods to evaluate therapeutic, unbound, drug concentrations in human brain also contribute to development failure. Further disease related changes in BBB properties and tissue composition raise a concern of altered drug neuropharmacokinetics (neuroPK) during disease. This calls for the evaluation of translational aspects of neuroPK parameters in health and disease, and exploration of strategies for neuroPK translations between rodents and humans.

    Positron emission tomography (PET) enables corresponding PK analysis in various species, although being restricted to measuring total, i.e. both unbound and nonspecifically bound, drug concentrations. However, the current work shows that PET can be used for the estimation of unbound, active, brain concentrations and for assessment of drug BBB transport, if compensation is made for intra-brain drug distribution and binding. Adapted PET designs could be applied in humans where rat estimates of drug intra-brain distribution may be used with reasonable accuracy for concentration conversions in healthy humans, but preferably not in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. As shown in this thesis, a high variability in nonspecific drug tissue binding was observed in AD compared to rats and human controls that might lead to unacceptable bias of outcome values if used in PET. Furthermore, heterogeneity in drug tissue binding among brain regions in both rodents and humans was detected and must be considered in regional investigations of neuroPK. By the use of transgenic animal models of amyloid beta and alpha-synuclein pathology, the work further suggests that the BBB is able to uphold sufficient capacity for the transport of small molecular drugs and integrity towards large molecules despite the presence of hallmarks representative of neurodegenerative diseases.

    This thesis work provides insight into neurodegenerative disease impact on neuroPK and contributes with translational strategies for neuroPK evaluation from preclinical investigations to the clinic, aimed to aid drug development and optimal disease management.

  • Lagali, Neil S.
    et al.
    Allgeier, Stephan
    Guimaraes, Pedro
    Badian, Reza A.
    Ruggeri, Alfredo
    Koehler, Bernd
    Utheim, Tor Paaske
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Peterson, Magnus
    Dahlin, Lars B.
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Reduced Corneal Nerve Fiber Density in Type 2 Diabetes by Wide-Area Mosaic Analysis2017In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 58, no 14, p. 6318-6327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE. To determine if corneal subbasal nerve plexus (SBP) parameters derived from wide-area depth-corrected mosaic images are associated with type 2 diabetes.

    METHODS. One hundred sixty-three mosaics were produced from eyes of 82 subjects by laser-scanning in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). Subjects were of the same age, without (43 subjects) or with type 2 diabetes (39 subjects). Mosaic corneal nerve fiber length density (mCNFL) and apical whorl corneal nerve fiber length density (wCNFL) were quantified and related to the presence and duration of diabetes (short duration < 10 years and long duration ≥10 years).

    RESULTS. In mosaics with a mean size of 6 mm2 in subjects aged 69.1 ± 1.2 years, mCNFL in type 2 diabetes was reduced relative to nondiabetic subjects (13.1 ± 4.2 vs. 15.0 ± 3.2 mm/mm2, P = 0.018). Also reduced relative to nondiabetic subjects was mCNFL in both short-duration (14.0 ± 4.0 mm/mm2, 3.2 ± 3.9 years since diagnosis) and long-duration diabetes (12.7 ± 4.2 mm/mm2, 15.4 ± 4.2 years since diagnosis; ANOVA P =0.023). Lower mCNFL was associated with presence of diabetes (=0.032) and increased hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels (P = 0.047). By contrast, wCNFL was unaffected by diabetes or HbA1c (P > 0.05). Global SBP patterns revealed marked degeneration of secondary nerve fiber branches outside the whorl region in long-duration diabetes.

    CONCLUSIONS. Wide-area mosaic images provide reference values for mCNFL and wCNFL and reveal a progressive degeneration of the SBP with increasing duration of type 2 diabetes.

  • Leavitt, Steven D.
    et al.
    Brigham Young Univ, Dept Biol, Provo, UT 84602 USA.;Brigham Young Univ, Monte L Bean Life Sci Museum, Provo, UT 84602 USA..
    Westberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Nelsen, Matthew P.
    Field Museum, Sci & Educ, Chicago, IL USA..
    Elix, John A.
    Australian Natl Univ, Res Sch Chem, Canberra, ACT, Australia..
    Timdal, Einar
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, Oslo, Norway..
    Sohrabi, Mohammad
    Iranian Res Org Sci & Technol, Dept Biotechnol, Tehran, Iran..
    Clair, Larry L. St.
    Brigham Young Univ, Dept Biol, Provo, UT 84602 USA.;Brigham Young Univ, Monte L Bean Life Sci Museum, Provo, UT 84602 USA..
    Williams, Laura
    Univ Kaiserslautern, Biol Inst, Plant Ecol & Systemat, Kaiserslautern, Germany..
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bot, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lumbsch, H. T.
    Field Museum, Sci & Educ, Chicago, IL USA..
    Multiple, Distinct Intercontinental Lineages but Isolation of Australian Populations in a Cosmopolitan Lichen-Forming Fungal Taxon, Psora decipiens (Psoraceae, Ascomycota)2018In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 9, article id 283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple drivers shape the spatial distribution of species, including dispersal capacity, niche incumbency, climate variability, orographic barriers, and plate tectonics. However, biogeographic patterns of fungi commonly do not fit conventional expectations based on studies of animals and plants. Fungi, in general, are known to occur across exceedingly broad, intercontinental distributions, including some important components of biological soil crust communities (BSCs). However, molecular data often reveal unexpected biogeographic patterns in lichenized fungal species that are assumed to have cosmopolitan distributions. The lichen-forming fungal species Psora decipiens is found on all continents, except Antarctica and occurs in BSCs across diverse habitats, ranging from hot, arid deserts to alpine habitats. In order to better understand factors that shape population structure in cosmopolitan lichen-forming fungal species, we investigated biogeographic patterns in the cosmopolitan taxon P. decipiens, along with the closely related taxa P. crenata and P. saviczii. We generated a multi-locus sequence dataset based on a worldwide sampling of these taxa in order to reconstruct evolutionary relationships and explore phylogeographic patterns. Both P. crenata and P. decipiens were not recovered as monophyletic; and P. saviczii specimens were recovered as a monophyletic clade closely related to a number of lineages comprised of specimens representing P. decipiens. Striking phylogeographic patterns were observed for P. crenata, with populations from distinct geographic regions belonging to well-separated, monophyletic lineages. South African populations of P. crenata were further divided into well-supported sub-clades. While well-supported phylogenetic substructure was also observed for the nominal taxon P. decipiens, nearly all lineages were comprised of specimens collected from intercontinental populations. However, all Australian specimens representing P. decipiens were recovered within a single well-supported monophyletic clade consisting solely of Australian samples. Our study supports up to 10 candidate species-level lineages in P. decipiens, based on genealogical concordance and coalescent-based species delimitation analyses. Our results support the general pattern of the biogeographic isolation of lichen-forming fungal populations in Australia, even in cases where closely related congeners have documented intercontinental distributions. Our study has important implications for understanding factors influencing diversification and distributions of lichens associated with BSC.

  • Persson, Ingrid
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Spatial Planning.
    The rise and fall of the houses of Attefall: Effects of reduced building regulation in coastal municipalities with large numbers of second homes2018In: The Routledge Handbook of Second Home Tourism and Mobilities / [ed] C.Michael Hall and Dieter K.Müller, Routledge, 2018, p. 86-97Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is nowadays a country of housing shortage and the latest changes of the Planning and Building Act are intended to simplify an increased house-building. The Swedish Parliament thus decided in July 2014 to allow a new type of house; the so called “attefall house”, named after the answerable minister Stefan Attefall. In most cases only an application to the municipality followed by a starting permit from the building committee is needed without involving the neighbours, but in some special cases an ordinary building permit is still needed. The political cause to ease restrictions was to make it easier for house-owners to build and to let rooms in times of housing shortage, especially in the metropolitan areas. The national association of Swedish house-owners thus calculated with 200 000 new possibilities of dwellings for rent. The “attefall house” is however intended for second home use as well as permanent living. According to a questionnaire by the Swedish Television, the number of applications related to independent complementary dwellings, is negligible (totally 19 applications) in the three greatest cities in Sweden; Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmö during the first year of the reform. The main part of the 5150 approved applications are connected to guest-houses etc. The interest has been topmost in municipalities well-known for large numbers of second homes. The article discusses the outcome in these kinds of coastal areas.

  • Rosenberg, Otto
    Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift: Volym 1: Häfte 4, 19071907Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    INNEHÅLLSFÖRTECKNING. GUSTAF O. A:N MALME: Afvikande tal- och ställningsförhållanden i blomman hos Gentiana campestris L. VEIT BRECHER WITTROCK: Polycarpon tetraphyllum L. i Sverige. SELIM BIRGER: Rügen som exkursionsort för svenska botanister. HENRIK HESSELMAN: Orobanche alba Stephan *rubra Hooker och dess förekomst på Gotland. J. LIND: Liste over Svampe indsamlede under Svenska Botaniska Föreningens Exkursion til Billingen 1907. CARL SKOTTSBERG: Om växtligheten å några tångbäddar i Nyländska skärgården i Finland. OTTO ROSENBERG: Zur Kenntnis der präsynaptischen Entwicklungsphasen der Reduktionsteilung. SVENSKA BOTANISKA FÖRENINGEN: Föreningens årsmöte. Föreningens sommarexkursion 1907. SAMMANKOMSTER. SMÄRRE MEDDELANDEN: RUTGER SERNANDER: Pilularia globulifera L. funnen i Närke. OTTO ROSENBERG: Om växternas utbildning i rinnande vatten. REFERAT: OTTO ROSENBERG: C. A. M. Lindman; Lycopodium complanatum L. 'moniliforme n. subsp. TYCHO VESTERGREN: Dr. Erwin Janchen; Helianthemum canum (L.) Baumg. und seine nächsten Verwandten. NOTISER: Till redaktionen inlämnade afhandlingar och tidskrifter. Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift: Titelblad, innehållsförteckning och artförteckning till Bd 1. Medlemsförteckning.

  • Rosenberg, Otto
    Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift: Volym 1: Häfte 3, 19071907Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    INNEHÅLLSFÖRTECKNING. H. DAHLSTEDT: Hieracier från Torne Lappmark och närgränsande områden. NILS SVEDELIUS: Om endemismen och de nyare artbildningsteorierna. GUSTAF O. A:N MALME: Några ord om de i Stockholmstrakten förekommande Parmelia-arterna af undersläktet Hypogymina. GUNNAR ANDERSSON: Om förekomsten af Beta maritima på Sveriges västkust. OTTO ROSENBERG: Till kännedomen om ymphybrider. SMÄRRE MEDDELANDEN: E. COLLINDER: Erythraea vulgaris (Rafn) Willd. ånyo funnen i Medelpad. ALBERT ATTERBERG: Främlingar på Kalmar hamn.

  • Rosenberg, Otto
    Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift: Volym 1: Häfte 2, 19071907Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    INNEHÅLLSFÖRTECKNING. HENRIK HESSELMAN: Carl Linnaeus (hyllning). RUTGER SERNANDER: Om några former för art- och varietetsbildning hos lafvama. TORSTEN LAGERBERG: Über die Blüte von Viola mirabilis. K. JOHANSSON: Till Gotska Sandöns floristik. MÅRTEN SONDÉN: Anteckningar om floran inom Tornejavreområdet. O. JUEL: Öfversikt af våra värdväxlande rostsvampar. E. HEMMENDORFF: Fazenda Santa Albertina. GUSTAF O. A:N MALME: Några bildningsafvikelser i blomman hos Pyrola uniflora L. NILS SVEDELIUS: Frans Reinhold Kjellman (nekrolog). SVENSKA BOTANISKA FÖRENINGEN. SAMMANKOMSTER. SMÄRRE MEDDELANDEN: JOHAN BERGGREN: Typha angustifolia L. x latifolia L. J. A. O. SKÅRMAN: Gymnadenia conopea (L.) x Gymnadenia albida (L.) från Torne Lappmark. Utnämningar och förordnanden. Nyutkommen litteratur med anledning af LINNÉ-jubiléet. Till redaktionen inlämnade tidskrifter och af handlingar.

  • Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden / Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Strang, Susann
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för vård och natur.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Training Intervention for Health Care Staff in the Provision of Existential Support to Patients With Cancer: A Randomized, Controlled Study2013In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, ISSN 0885-3924, E-ISSN 1873-6513, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 785-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: When a patient receives a cancer diagnosis, existential issues become more compelling. Throughout the illness trajectory, patients with cancer are cared for in oncology wards, by home care teams or in hospices. Nurses working with these patients are sometimes aware of the patients' existential needs but do not feel confident when discussing these issues.

    Objectives: To determine the effects of a training intervention, where the focus is on existential issues and nurses' perceived confidence in communication and their attitude toward caring for dying patients.

    Methods: This was a randomized, controlled trial with a training intervention comprising theoretical training in existential issues combined with individual and group reflection. In total, 102 nurses in oncology and hospice wards and in palliative home care teams were randomized to a training or non-training group. Primary outcomes, confidence in communication, and attitude toward the care of dying patients were measured at baseline, immediately after the training, and five to six months later.

    Results: Confidence in communication improved significantly in the training group from baseline (before the training) to both the first and second follow-up, that is, immediately after the training and five months later. The attitude toward caring for the dying did not improve in the training group.

    Conclusion: This study shows that short-term training with reflection improves the confidence of health care staff when communicating, which is important for health care managers with limited resources. Further studies are needed to explore how patients experience the communication skills of health care staff after such training. 

  • Public defence: 2018-05-18 13:15 Humanistiska teatern, Uppsala
    Bodin, Maja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    To Plan or Not to Plan: Gender Perspectives on Pregnancy Planning, Fertility Awareness and Preconception Health and Care2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The level of pregnancy planning is of importance to the well-being of parents and children. Unintended and/or unwanted pregnancies are often associated with less health promoting behavior during pregnancy, poorer health of the new born, and relationship dissatisfaction. Preconception care is a health service with the purpose to encourage people to become mindful about their reproductive intentions and raise fertility awareness, in order to maintain or improve reproductive health.

    Reproductive health is a highly gendered area, both due to biological conditions and social expectations on gender. In most cases, the focus of reproductive health and health promotion is on cis-women and their bodies. This thesis mainly focuses on persons self-identifying as men. The aim is to scrutinize the area of preconception health, investigate what pregnancy planning means to men and explore the relationship between pregnancy planning and fertility awareness.

    In Study I, 136 couples who attended their first antenatal visit answered questions about pregnancy planning. Most pregnancies were planned and couples had similar perceptions of the level of their planning. Study II describes pregnancy planning behavior and fertility knowledge among 796 recent fathers. Also in this study, most pregnancies were planned and 17% of the men had made at least one preconception lifestyle adjustment to improve health and fertility. Fertility knowledge varied greatly, although men with higher education demonstrated higher knowledge. Study III explores if Reproductive Life Plan-based counselling during a sexual health visit could increase men’s fertility awareness. The counselling had a moderate effect on participants’ fertility knowledge but managed to raise new thoughts about their own fertility, and was well received. Study IV follows up on the results from the first three studies, through in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with 25 men aged 23-49. Most participants took their fertility for granted. To cis-men in heterosexual relationships, the meaning of pregnancy planning usually meant taking the decision to try to become pregnant, and not much more. Trans-men and gay men where more invested in practical planning issues. In conclusion, this thesis shows how pregnancy planning is gendered, and that it is a more complex phenomenon than previously acknowledged.

  • Wolf, J. L.
    et al.
    Fed Inst Geosci & Nat Resources, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover, Germany..
    Niemi, Auli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Bensabat, J.
    Environm & Water Resources Engn EWRE Ltd, POB 6770, IL-31067 Haifa, Israel..
    May, F.
    Fed Inst Geosci & Nat Resources, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover, Germany..
    Ruetters, H.
    Fed Inst Geosci & Nat Resources, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover, Germany..
    Rebscher, D.
    Fed Inst Geosci & Nat Resources, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover, Germany..
    2D reactive transport simulations of CO2 streams containing impurities in a saline aquifer, Heletz, Israel2017In: 13Th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, Ghgt-13 / [ed] Dixon, T Laloui, L Twinning, S, Elsevier, 2017, p. 3537-3546Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to evaluate the chemical impacts of CO2 stream impurities on reservoir rocks, 2D reactive transport simulations using the code TOUGHREACT V3.0 were performed. The underlying reservoir properties are based on in-situ data from the CO2 injection test site Heletz, Israel. Two different CO2 compositions (mole fractions 99 % CO2 + 1 % SO2 and 98.8 % CO2 + 1 % SO2 + 0.2 % NO2, respectively) were chosen to represent oxidising impurities. Different modelling approaches, namely trace gas transport (TGT) and additional brine injection (ABI), were applied to investigate the influence of these modelling approaches on qualitative and quantitative simulation results. The simulations using either approach show an accumulation of SO2 and NO2 close to the injection well due to the preferential dissolution of these acidic impurities compared to CO2. Both modelling approaches indicate the same general chemical impact and related mineral reactions. Within the affected rock volume a distinct ankerite to anhydrite conversion occurs, which slightly enhances porosity. While the same qualitative conclusions independently from the chosen modelling approach were obtained, the quantitative magnitude of mineral conversion and the spatial extent of impurity affected rock material depend on the chosen modelling approach and thus need further investigation with respect to e.g. validation by field test data. (C) 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • Mander, Sarah
    et al.
    Univ Manchester, Tyndall Ctr Climate Change Res, Manchester M13 4PL, Lancs, England..
    Anderson, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Univ Manchester, Tyndall Ctr Climate Change Res, Manchester M13 4PL, Lancs, England.
    Larkin, Alice
    Univ Manchester, Tyndall Ctr Climate Change Res, Manchester M13 4PL, Lancs, England..
    Gough, Clair
    Univ Manchester, Tyndall Ctr Climate Change Res, Manchester M13 4PL, Lancs, England..
    Vaughan, Naomi
    Univ East Anglia, Tyndall Ctr Climate Change Res, Norwich NR4 7TJ, Norfolk, England..
    The role of bio-energy with carbon capture and storage in meeting the climate mitigation challenge: A whole system perspective2017In: 13Th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, Ghgt-13 / [ed] Dixon, T Laloui, L Twinning, S, Elsevier, 2017, p. 6036-6043Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the role and implications of bio-energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) for addressing the climate change mitigation challenge. Framed within the context of the latest emissions budgets, and their associated uncertainty, we present a summary of the contribution of BECCS within the Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) scenarios used by the climate change community. Within this discussion we seek to shed light on two important areas. Firstly, that BECCS is a central, but often hidden element of many of the modelling work that underpins climate policy from the global to the national scale. The second area we address are the assumptions for BECCS embedded within IAM models, and the wider system consequences of these implied levels of deployment. In light of these challenges, we question whether BECCS can deliver what is anticipated of it within existing climate change policy. (C) 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • Public defence: 2018-05-22 13:00 Geijersalen, Uppsala
    Fraser, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    People of the Dolmens and Stone Cists: An archaeogenetic Investigation of Megalithic Graves from the Neolithic Period on Gotland2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of ancient genomics of pre-historic human remains has in recent years offered unprecedented knowledge regarding pre-historic migration and population structure on the European continent which has fundamentally altered the current views in the archaeological community. However, the merging of the two fields, archaeology and genetics, is still in its infancy and much work is still needed in order for these fields to integrate. In this thesis I explore how genetic analyses, in combination with contextual radiocarbon dating and isotopic analyses for diet and mobility can be used to investigate demographic events on a local and regional level. This is done through the investigation of people buried in five previously excavated megalithic tombs on the Island of Gotland dated to the Neolithic period. I present the genomic population structure and archaeological background for the pre-historic European reference data and show how this is used to investigate population continuity, demographic shifts, cultural duality, and admixture for local and regional contexts. I present new data and explore the Strontium-baseline for the Gotland biosphere which is used for the mobility analyses. I show that mitochondrial haplogroup data is especially useful in combination with isotopic data, and radiocarbon dating for investigation of demographic shifts on a larger scale. I also show that genomic data gives unique insights into the individuals’ life history which, together with the established demographic background allows for fine scale investigation of population demographic events within and between different archaeological contexts. Finally I show that the different Neolithic contexts on Gotland to a large extent involves immigration of new groups to the island, and that the contextual breaks seen in the archaeological record during the Neolithic period are connected with cultural and population demographic shifts. This dissertation demonstrates that genomic analyses, in combination with archaeology and isotopic analyses, as well as contextual osteological analyses and radiocarbon dating, present unique insights into the life history of the actual people who lived the lives we try to understand.

  • Bergnéhr, Disa
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Enell, Sofia
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Behavioural Science and Social Work. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue).
    Ungdomars och unga vuxnas levnadsvillkor i Sverige: En kunskapsöversikt med fokus på ojämlikhet2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Jämlikhet och jämlika villkor betyder att alla har samma möjligheter att utvecklas, tillgodogöra sig utbildning, uppnå god socioekonomisk standard, vara vid god hälsa och uppnå sin fulla potential. Ojämlika villkor innebär att vissa grupper har sämre chanser än andra till utveckling, lärande och välmående. Denna rapport handlar om ungdomar och unga vuxna i Sverige mellan åldrarna 13 och 25 år. Syftet är att sammanställa svenska studier från 2008 till 2016 som granskar ungdomars uppväxt- och levnadsvillkor och hur dessa skiljer sig beroende på kön, ursprung, ekonomiska förutsättningar och funktionsnedsättning.

    Rapporten har särskilt fokus på följande områden: ekonomiska villkor, boende, utbildning, sysselsättning, hälsa, fritid, inflytande och delaktighet samt brottslighet och utsatthet för brott. Den bygger på två typer av material: nationella rapporter från svenska statliga myndigheter och organisationer, och vetenskapligt granskade forskningsstudier. Rapporten visar att majoriteten av ungdomar och unga vuxna i Sverige har goda uppväxt- och levnadsvillkor. Välståndet och de ekonomiska förutsättningarna har ökat de senaste tjugo åren. Samtidigt har den fattigaste andelen av befolkningen blivit större, och dessa har inte kunnat ta del av den generella förbättringen. Det framkommer tydligt att låg ekonomisk standard påverkar ungdomars och unga vuxnas övriga levnadsvillkor negativt med bland annat ökad risk för fysisk och psykisk ohälsa, bristfälliga relationer till vänner och föräldrar, kriminalitet, utsatthet för brott och otrygghet, trångboddhet, låga studieresultat, arbetslöshet, bidragsberoende och ingripanden av den sociala barnavården. Det är särskilt ungdomar som bor med ensamstående föräldrar (vanligtvis mamman), har utrikes födda föräldrar och/eller lever i hushåll med låg socioekonomisk status som drabbas av följderna.

    Skolgången har mycket stor betydelse för ungdomars hälsa, välmående och framtida möjligheter till utbildning och sysselsättning. Oavsett familjeförhållanden är godkända betyg och bra relationer till klasskamrater och lärare viktiga för att minska risken för ohälsa. Flickor presterar bättre än pojkar i skolan, men uppvisar i högre grad stressrelaterade psykosomatiska problem och etablerar sig senare på arbetsmarknaden. Det är framför allt pojkar med utländskt ursprung som uppvisar problem i skolan och runt hälften saknar behörighet till gymnasiet efter årskurs nio.

    Ungdomar och unga vuxna som vuxit upp i familjer med behov av försörjningsstöd, haft en kontaktperson genom socialtjänsten och/eller varit placerad i boende utanför hemmet är särskilt utsatta. De löper stor risk för misslyckad skolgång, fysisk och psykisk ohälsa, kriminalitet och förtidig död.

    Rapporten belyser områden i behov av ökad kunskap. Mer kunskap behövs om levnadsvillkoren för unga med olika former av funktionsnedsättningar. Detsamma gäller för hedersrelaterat våld och förtryck, som många flickor och kvinnor lever under. Generellt kan sägas att mer kunskap behövs om hur ungdomar och unga vuxna själva förstår och upplever sin livssituation, inte minst om hur de handlar och vilka strategier de tillämpar för att påverka sitt liv och sin framtid. Forskning om ungdomar i tidiga tonåren (13–14 år) samt unga vuxna (20–25 år) är inte lika vanligt förekommande som forskning om äldre tonåringar (15–19 år). Av de områden som rapporten särskilt fokuserar på behövs mer kunskap om fritidsaktiviteter, delaktighet och inflytande samt brottslighet och utsatthet för brott.

    Det presenteras även en rad förslag som kan vara till underlag vid det fortsatta arbetet med att förbättra ungdomars och unga vuxnas levnadsvillkor i Sverige. Exempelvis behövs fler och effektivare interventioner för de grupper som i denna rapport har identifierats som marginaliserade. Villkoren behöver förbättras för ungdomar och unga vuxna i socioekonomiskt utsatta bostadsområden, resurssvaga familjer med eller utan försörjningsstöd, unga placerade i dygnsvård utanför hemmet, unga med funktionsnedsättning, missbruk eller i behov av psykiatrisk vård, unga som står utan sysselsättning, och unga som begår eller utsätts för brott. Åtgärder för att säkerställa en likvärdig skolgång och möjliggöra för skolväsendet att uppfylla sitt kompensatoriska uppdrag är viktiga för att förbättra levnadsvillkoren.

  • Public defence: 2018-05-21 13:15 A1:107a, Uppsala
    Megquier, Kate
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Analysis of inherited and somatic variants to decipher canine complex traits2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents several investigations of the dog as a model for complex diseases, focusing on cancers and the effect of genetic risk factors on clinical presentation.

    In Papers I and II, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify germline risk factors predisposing US golden retrievers to hemangiosarcoma (HSA) and B-cell lymphoma (BLSA). Paper I identified two loci predisposing to both HSA and BLSA, approximately 4 megabases (Mb) apart on chromosome 5. Carrying the risk haplotype at these loci was associated with separate changes in gene expression, both relating to T-cell activation and proliferation.

    Paper II followed up on the HSA GWAS by performing a meta-analysis with additional cases and controls. This confirmed three previously reported GWAS loci for HSA and revealed three new loci, the most significant on chromosome 18. This locus contains several candidate genes with a clear role in carcinogenesis, including KMT5B and LRP5. Overall, carriers of the risk alleles at the top six loci are diagnosed with HSA earlier in life.

    In Paper III we investigated the somatic mutations which occur in HSA tumor tissue by performing tumor-normal exome sequencing of 47 golden retrievers. We identified 7 recurrently mutated genes, including the tumor suppressor TP53 (mutated in 59.6% of tumors) and oncogene PIK3CA (mutated in 29.8% of tumors). Additional somatically mutated genes overlap those found in human angiosarcomas, suggesting that angiosarcomas in dogs and humans are genetically very similar.

    In Paper IV, we investigated the variable penetrance of a SOD1 mutation in Pembroke Welsh corgis causing degenerative myelopathy (DM), a model of the human motor neuron disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We discovered that regulatory variants near the SP110 gene were associated with an increased risk of DM and an earlier age at diagnosis, suggesting a role for immune response in the pathogenesis of the disease.

    Taken together, these findings provide new insight into the pathophysiology of both hemangiosarcoma and degenerative myelopathy, which could guide future diagnostics and therapeutic strategies both in humans and veterinary patients. In addition, they demonstrate the power of the dog as a biomedical model for human complex diseases.

  • Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Ruge, Toralph
    Kjøller, Erik
    Hilden, Jørgen
    Kolmos, Hans Jørn
    Sajadieh, Ahmad
    Kastrup, Jens
    Jensen, Gorm Boje
    Larsson, Anders
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Karolinska institutet.
    10-year associations between tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 and cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary heart disease: a CLARICOR (effect of clarithromycin on mortality and morbidity in patients with ischemic heart disease) trial substudy2018In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 7, no 9, article id e008299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to assess the associations and predictive powers between the soluble receptors for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (TNFR1 and TNFR2) and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: <0.001 for TNFR2). The associations were similar in the replication sample. The associations with the composite outcome were mainly driven by acute myocardial infarction, cardiovascular mortality, and noncardiovascular mortality. The addition of TNFR1 and TNFR2 to established cardiovascular risk factors improved prediction only modestly (<1%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Increased concentrations of circulating TNFR1 and TNFR2 were associated with increased risks of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with stable coronary heart disease. Yet, the utility of measuring TNFR1 and TNFR2 to improve risk prediction in these patients appears limited.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00121550.

  • Rhodes, Emma
    et al.
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Kennedy, Ben M.
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Lavallée, Yan
    Department of Earth, Ocean and Ecological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Hornby, Adrian
    Department of Earth, Ocean and Ecological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.;Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich, Munich, Germany.
    Edwards, Matt
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Chigna, Gustavo
    Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hydrologia, Guatemala City, Guatemala.
    Textural Insights Into the Evolving Lava Dome Cycles at Santiaguito Lava Dome, Guatemala2018In: Frontiers in Earth Science, ISSN 1096-231X, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 6, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structures and textures preserved in lava domes reflect underlying magmatic and eruptive processes, and may provide evidence of how eruptions initiate and evolve. This study explores the remarkable cycles in lava extrusion style produced between 1922 and 2012 at the Santiaguito lava dome complex, Guatemala. By combining an examination of eruptive lava morphologies and textures with a review of historical records, we aim to constrain the processes responsible for the range of erupted lava type and morphologies. The Santiaguito lava dome complex is divided into four domes (El Caliente, La Mitad, El Monje, El Brujo), containing a range of proximal structures (e.g., spines) from which a series of structurally contrasting lava flows originate. Vesicular lava flows (with a'a like, yet non-brecciated flow top) have the highest porosity with interconnected spheroidal pores and may transition into blocky lava flows. Blocky lava flows are high volume and texturally variable with dense zones of small tubular aligned pore networks and more porous zones of spheroidal shaped pores. Spines are dense and low volume and contain small skeletal shaped pores, and subvertical zones of sigmoidal pores. We attribute the observed differences in pore shapes to reflect shallow inflation, deflation, flattening, or shearing of the pore fraction. Effusion rate and duration of the eruption define the amount of time available for heating or cooling, degassing and outgassing prior to and during extrusion, driving changes in pore textures and lava type. Our new textural data when reviewed with all the other published data allow a cyclic model to be developed. The cyclic eruption models are influenced by viscosity changes resulting from (1) initial magmatic composition and temperature, and (2) effusion rate which in turn affects degassing, outgassing and cooling time in the conduit. Each lava type presents a unique set of hazards and understanding the morphologies and dome progression is useful in hazard forecasting.

  • Public defence: 2018-05-23 10:00 De Geersalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Stockholm
    Si, Wei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Empirical Essays in Labor and Development Economics2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis consists of three self-contained empirical essays in labor and development economics.

    Diverse Expertise, Peer Effects, and Research Productivity: Does diversity in idea space matter? We empirically explore whether the cognitive distance between collaborators affects peer effects and productivity in creating knowledge. We measure the cognitive distance between two researchers based on their publication distributions and citation relations across academic journals in which they have publications. Using individual-level panel data from the Web of Science databases of academic papers published from 1980 to 2013, we estimate the changes in productivity of the coauthors of active and eminent life scientists who passed away unexpectedly and prematurely to examine whether the impacts on coauthors differ with the cognitive distance. The results show that cognitively close coauthors are more likely to experience a lasting decrease in research productivity for both quantity and quality measures, while cognitively distant coauthors are affected mainly in output quantity. The findings suggest that both knowledge spillovers and skill complementarity play a role in collaborations. The loss of an irreplaceable source of ideas seems to have a more adverse impact on a scientist's productivity than the potentially imperfect skill substitution that follows such a loss.

    Public Health Insurance and the Labor Market: Evidence from China's Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance provides empirical evidence on labor market effects of public health insurance, using evidence from a national public health insurance program in China, the Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI), which targeted residents in urban areas, who were not insured by the pre-existing employment-based health insurance. I find that the URBMI did not have a significant average causal effect on employment for the sample as a whole. However, URBMI increased self-employment among workers who used to be employees in the formal sector, indicating a reduction in job lock.  After the program was implemented, employment in the informal sector among women and the lower-educated increased, while labor supply among people with more schooling decreased. The results are consistent with evidence of the labor market impacts of public health insurance on reducing job lock, increasing informality, and affecting labor supply for different sub-populations.

    Higher Education and Women's Empowerment: Evidence from China's Higher Education Expansion studies the impact of higher education on women’s empowerment, taking advantage of China’s higher education expansion in the late 1990s. Higher education may potentially foster women’s empowerment by reducing gender stereotyping and promoting women in the labor market. I estimate the impacts on educational attainment, attitudes on gender norms, labor market outcomes, and marital matching. The empirical results show that the reform has significantly increased higher educational attainment for women. However, it did not change traditional gender norms and marital matching patterns concerning labor market outcomes. The results may be attributed to the fact that there was no improvement of women’s disadvantaged status in the labor market and households after the expansion. The findings suggest that it is critical to promote gender equality in the labor market and help women to overcome the dilemma between career and family to foster female empowerment.

  • Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Framing and visualising biodiversity in EU policy2018In: Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences, ISSN 1943-815X, E-ISSN 1943-8168, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 103-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks insights into how biodiversity is framed and visualised in EU policy. The paper presents analysis of both the visual content and written text of two brochures summarising two central EU biodiversity policy documents. The study illustrates how the two modes of communication differ. First, the written text primarily presents an anthropocentric and economic framing of biodiversity values, whereas the visual material generally features the beauty and wonders of nature. Second, the written text strongly emphasises the threats to biodiversity and the detrimental side of human activity, whereas the visual material generally shows close relationships between humans and nature, with humans engaged in small-scale outdoor activities. The analysis illustrates how various representations of biodiversity intersect in the same context, and that the visual representation decontextualises the issue of biodiversity loss from the human exploitation of natural resources and the concrete actions and processes causing it.

  • Gorantis, Anastasios
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Physics.
    Minahan, Joseph A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Physics.
    Naseer, Usman
    MIT, Ctr Theoret Phys, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Analytic continuation of dimensions in supersymmetric localization2018In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 2, article id 070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compute the perturbative partition functions for gauge theories with eight supersymmetries on spheres of dimension d <= 5, proving a conjecture by the second author. We apply similar methods to gauge theories with four supersymmetries on spheres with d <= 3. The results are valid for non-integer d as well. We further propose an analytic continuation from d = 3 to d = 4 that gives the perturbative partition function for an N = 1 gauge theory. The results are consistent with the free multiplets and the one-loop beta-functions for general N = 1 gauge theories. We also consider the analytic continuation of an N = 1 preserving mass deformation of the maximally supersymmetric gauge theory and compare to recent holographic results for N = 1* super Yang-Mills. We find that the general structure for the real part of the free energy coming from the analytic continuation is consistent with the holographic results.

  • Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Popular education, migration and a discourse of inclusion2018In: Studies in the Education of Adults, ISSN 0266-0830, E-ISSN 1478-9833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we focus on how a discourse on inclusion operates through language learning programmes for migrants. We direct our attention to a new form of activities funded by the Swedish government, Swedish from day 1, organised by popular education institutions. These activities emerged in connection to the migra- tion flows in 2015, receiving large sums in funding from the gov- ernment. They target newly arrived migrants who are waiting for a decision on their resident permit application, and the aim is to provide an introduction to the Swedish language as well as to Swedish society. Drawing on a Foucault-inspired theorization, we direct our attention to how a discourse of inclusion operate through the way these initiatives are spoken about, how these activities are described, what they are intended to attain, and what kind of citizen is shaped through such a way of speaking. We analyse policy documents produced by different actors involved in the process of Swedish from day 1, as well as case study descriptions of courses. We argue that the discourse on inclusion that emerges encompasses a wider as well as an instru- mental notion of inclusion. Migrants are positioned as ‘in deficit’, in need of knowledge in order to become included. Such know- ledge does not limit itself to knowledge of the Swedish language and knowledge about Swedish society, but also knowledge of health issues, and knowledge about how the migrants can market themselves and their competencies. We end the article by relating this discourse on inclusion to a wider discussion on neoliberal rationalities of governing.

  • Bay, Charlotta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Catasús, Bino
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. Norwegian School of Economics, Norway.
    Johed, Gustav
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Situating financial literacy2014In: Critical Perspectives on Accounting, ISSN 1045-2354, E-ISSN 1095-9955, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 36-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper comments on the conceptualisation of financial literacy by investigating how it is defined, problematised, and operationalised as a part of the efforts to overcome its perceived impediments. The backdrop of this study is the idea that the financial literacy movement goes hand in hand with the financialisation of society. By reporting from a study of financial literacy practices, the aim is to disentangle the notion of financial literacy from the assumption that it is a singular capability that, when gained, will automatically affect people's financial practices. The paper draws on a recent development in literacy research, New Literacy Studies, and on its division into autonomous and ideological definitions of literacy. The empirical illustrations originate from the efforts made to decrease financial illiteracy among Swedish adolescents and the demand for financial literacy in audit committees. Contrary to earlier studies, this paper demonstrates that financial literacy does not merely refer to a character trait that researchers may find lacking among the marginalised actors in society. Financial literacy cannot merely be viewed as the ability to read and write in the language of finance and accounting. Instead, financial literacy is a concept that needs to be situated and studied in practice because the characteristics that constitute financial literacy, or those that apply to it, vary with time and place.

  • Bay, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Makeover Accounting: Investigating the meaning-making practices of financial accounts2018In: Accounting, Organizations and Society, ISSN 0361-3682, E-ISSN 1873-6289, Vol. 64, p. 44-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The constitutive ability of accounting to produce effects, influencing people's minds and behaviour, has been widely acknowledged in accounting literature. This paper argues, however, that in order for accounting to have an impact on people, its figures needs to be interpretable to its intended users. But what happens in situations where people are considered as inhibited in reading and interpreting financial information? This paper investigates how financial accounts are presented to individuals believed to be impaired in their ability to make sense of its figures. It does so by moving the empirical focus beyond the borders of the professional organisation and into the private sphere of everyday life, examining how a televised financial makeover show literally re-presents financial information in order to turn its participants into financially responsible citizens. The paper's empirical findings give reasons for problematising the conditions under which accounting is able to affect people, concluding that, without taking people's ability to interpret financial accounts into consideration, the possibilities of the accounts having an impact on their users risk falling short.

  • Public defence: 2018-05-16 10:15 1B306, Fryxellsalen, Karlstad
    Javed, Asif
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences (from 2013).
    Effects of plasticizing and crosslinking on coatings based on blends of starch-PVOH and starch-lignin2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A barrier material is usually needed on a fiber-based food package to protect the packed food from gases and moisture and thus maintain its quality. Barrier materials presently used in food packaging applications are mostly petroleum-based polymers. Over the last few decades, efforts have been made to replace petroleum-based materials with bio-based materials. The present work has focused on the possibility of using a natural barrier material on a fiber-based food package and the  effects of plasticizing and cross-linking on the mechanical and barrier properties, and the stability in water of coatings based on starch-poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH) and starch-lignin blends.

    The flexibility of the starch films was increased by adding PVOH further by adding a plasticizer. It was shown that citric acid can act as a compatibilizer and cross-linker for starch and PVOH, and the use of citric acid may slow down the diffusion of both oxygen and water vapor if a multilayer coating strategy is used. The addition of polyethylene glycol to the pre-coating recipe resulted in a lower oxygen transmission rate through polyethylene-extruded board than when citric acid was added to the pre-coating. The flexibility of the barrier coatings and the properties of the base substrate affect the cracking tendency of the barrier coatings during the creasing and folding of a barrier-coated board.

    The addition of lignin to the starch reduced the migration of starch from the starch-lignin films and the addition of ammonium zirconium carbonate as a cross-linker reduced the migration of both starch and lignin from the films. The addition of starch to the lignin solution increased the solubility of lignin at low pH, and the pilot-coated board showed a significant decrease in migration of lignin from the coatings containing ammonium zirconium carbonate when the pH of the coating solution was decreased.

  • Sundqvist, Jan-Olov
    et al.
    Executive, Forskningsinstitut, IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Collin, Marie
    SCB.
    Edborg, Per
    SCB.
    Utvecklingsprojekt Avfallsbehandlingsanläggningar Delprojekt 2. Att använda miljörapporter som datakälla för avfallsbehandling2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I projektet har utvärderats hur miljörapporter ska användas vid framtagande av statistik om avfallsbehandling, främst för rapporteringen enligt EU:s avfallsstati-stikförordning. Resultatet visar att miljörapporterna normalt innehåller de viktigas-te uppgifterna, t.ex. om behandlat avfall, men att det ofta även saknas flera uppgif-ter som behövs, t.ex. uppkommet avfall för vissa behandlingsslag och uppkommet allmänt avfall. Användning av miljörapporter måste därför kombineras med använ-dande av avfallsfaktorer eller återanvändning av gamla data. Anledningen att upp-gifter saknas i miljörapporterna torde bero på att de inte krävs enligt miljörapport-föreskriften.

    En översikt av föreslagen metodik för att ta fram data om behandlat avfall, och uppkommet avfall vid behandlingen, visas i nedanstående tabell. Uppkommet avfall vid behandlingsan-läggningen

    Behandlat avfall

    Kapacitet

    Generellt

    Uppkommet avfall redovisas nationellt och i sektorer enligt WStatR

    Behandlat avfall redovisas nationellt, NUTS 1-nivå och länsvis (d.v.s. NUTS 3-nivå), undantag för av-fallsförbränning enligt nedan.

    Kapacitet och antal anläggningar redo-visas nationellt och på NUTS 2-nivå

    Behandlingsan-läggningar i NACE 05-33 (Utvinnings- och tillverkningsin-dustri)

    Ingår i inventering-en av genererat avfall. Om data saknas återanvänds tidigare data.

    Miljörapporter, enligt nedan, samt data från Skogsin-dustriernas och Jernkontorets under-sökningar.

    Miljörapporter eller schablonberäkning-ar.

    NACE 35 Energi-försörjning: för-bränningsanlägg-ningar

    Ingår ej i projektet att utreda

    Ingår ej i projektet att utreda

    Ingår ej i projektet att utreda

    NACE 35 övrigt. Ingår ej i projektet att utreda

    Ingår i undersök-ningen av genererat avfall. Sekundärt avfall särskiljs ej

    Genomförs på samma sätt som för NACE 38

    Genomförs på samma sätt som för NACE 38

    NACE 36, 37, 39 Vattenförsörjning, Avloppsrening,

    Särskilda undersök-ningar för huvud-grupperna

    Särskild undersök-ning i den mån av-fallsbehandling

    Särskild undersök-ning i den mån av-fallsbehandling

  • Assefa, Anteneh
    et al.
    Executive, Universitet, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Executive, Universitet, Umeå universitet, UmU.
    Tysklind, Mats
    Executive, Universitet, Umeå universitet, UmU.
    Josefsson, Sarah
    Executive, Myndigheter, Sveriges geologiska undersökning, SGU.
    Bignert, Anders
    Executive, Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, NRM.
    Wiberg, Karin
    Executive, Universitet, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Sources of dioxins in Baltic Sea herring: A modelling study for identification of dioxin sources and quantification of their temporal and spatial impacts2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents a step-by-step statistical analysis for tracing dioxins sources that have contributed to levels in Baltic herring during the last decades. The study is based on the concentrations of the 17 toxic (2,3,7,8-substituted) dioxin congeners in herring and sediment from the Baltic Sea, and it evaluates how the impacts of the sources may have changed during the studied periods, i.e. 1990–2009 in the Bothnian Bay, 1979–2009 in the Bothnian Sea and 1988–2009 in the Baltic Proper. The modelling technique used (PMF) extracted three dioxin patterns in herring that could be used to obtain source patterns after applying transformation factors. The transformed patterns were compared to real dioxin source patterns available through previous measurement and modelling studies. The identified sources included tetrachlorophenol (TCP), pentachlorophenol/atmospheric background (PCP/AB) and emissions from thermal activities.

    The results indicate that the thermal source type has been the major contributor of dioxins to Baltic herring during the pre-and post-2000 periods (72% and 59%, respectively). Its impact appears, however, to have declined by 19% in the Bothnian Bay, by 67% in the Bothnian Sea, and by 48% in the Baltic Proper (TEQ-basis). On the other hand, the relative importance of TCP and PCP/AB appear to have increased over time, from 1.4% and 1.5% to 19% and 6.6% in the Bothnian Bay, from 3.3% and 7.2% to 12% and 10% in the Bothnian Sea, and from 8.9% and <1% to 33% and 13% in the Baltic Proper. Comparisons using absolute values (pg TEQ g-1 lipid weight) indicate an increase of the TCP source by five times in the Bothnian Bay from the pre-2000 to the post-2000 period, a slight increase in the Bothnian Sea, and more than a doubling of the levels in the Baltic Proper. The agreement between the trends in the three sub-basins is a good indication for an increased impact of the TCP source during recent years (post-2000). Corresponding analysis for the PCP/AB source type, indicate slightly decreased TEQ levels from the PCP/AB source type in the Bothnian Sea (by ~50%), more than twice as high in the Bothnian Bay, and more than triplicated in the Baltic Proper. While the declining trends of the thermal source type encourages continuing management efforts for air emissions, the apparent increase of TCP and PCP/AB call for more attention to such sources in the Baltic Sea. As the use of technical products containing TCP and PCP have been banned/restricted since the 1970s and 1980s, more focus on contaminated sites may be required in the mitigation actions of such sources.

  • Westergaard, Jørgen M.
    et al.
    Huda, Anna
    Nordic Veterinary Contingency Planning: Report on activities to prevent exotic animal diseases entering the Nordic- Baltic Countries2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nordic Veterinary Contingency PlanningContingency planning within the area of animal health is based on four pillars: prevention, preparation, response and recovery. The objectives include to encourage animal keepers, veterinarians, producers of food and feed, consumers, private and public institutions involved in food safety to address in the daily work animal disease prevention and possible response related to disease threats and outbreaks.In 2006, the Nordic Council of Ministers (NCM) adopted a strategy plan to enhance veterinary contingency planning in the Nordic and Baltic countries resulting in the creation of the Nordic-Baltic Veterinary Contingency Group. This publication provides information on contingency planning based on the conduct of seminars, workshops and simulation exercises during 2007 – 2011, not previously available to readers of publications issued by NCM.

  • Public defence: 2018-05-19 10:15 Ihresalen, Engelska parken, Uppsala
    Lindgren, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Linguistics and Philology.
    Developing narrative competence: Swedish, Swedish-German and Swedish-Turkish children aged 4–62018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates the development of oral narrative competence from age 4 to 6 in Swedish monolinguals (N=72) and in both languages of Swedish-German (N=46) and Swedish-Turkish (N=48) bilinguals growing up in Sweden. Picture-based fictional narratives were elicited with Cat/Dog and Baby Birds/Baby Goats from the Multilingual Assessment Instrument for Narratives (MAIN, Gagarina et al. 2012) and A2/B2 from the Edmonton Narrative Norms Instrument (ENNI, Schneider et al., 2005). Vocabulary, character introduction and narrative macrostructure were studied. Vocabulary production scores on Cross-linguistic lexical tasks (CLTs, Haman et al., 2015) were compared to NDW (number of different words) in narratives. Production of macrostructural components, macrostructural complexity, and answers to comprehension questions were analyzed. Effects of age and differences in performance between groups, between the bilinguals’ two languages, and between narrative tasks were investigated.

    Narrative comprehension was high already at age 4, but still developed substantially with age. In contrast, macrostructure in narrative production was at a rudimentary level at age 4. Even at age 6, the narratives contained few complete episodic structures. Children mainly included actions visible in the stimuli and rarely verbalized goals and other macrostructural components that required inferencing. The ability to introduce story characters appropriately developed strongly from age 4 to 6, but stimuli had a large effect on performance. Vocabulary showed most improvement from age 5 to 6. Development with age was clearer for the majority language Swedish than the minority languages German and Turkish, where individual variation was larger.

    In Swedish, pronounced differences were found between the bilingual groups. The Swedish-German bilinguals performed similarly to the monolinguals. On most measures, the Swedish-Turkish bilinguals performed lower than the other two groups, though precisely how much varied across measures. Generally, the Swedish-German children performed better in Swedish than in German, whereas the Swedish-Turkish children performed similarly in both languages or slightly higher in Turkish. The study shows that bilinguals’ two languages need not develop in parallel, and that results depend on the tasks and specific measures used. Bilingual groups differ from each other, and it is therefore not meaningful to compare all bilinguals to all monolinguals.

     

  • Lehtonen, Kari K.
    et al.
    Aino, Ahvo
    Jørgensen, Kirsten S.
    Schultz, Eija
    Berezina, Nadezhda
    Breitholtz, Magnus
    Eklund, Britta
    Linde, Margareta
    Ström, Karin
    Sundelin, Brita
    Strand, Jakob
    Sediment biotesting in the Baltic Sea: The CONTEST Project2018Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sediments contaminated by human activities usually contain a mixture of chemicals that produce unforeseen combined toxic effects in organisms. Thus, traditional risk assessments based on the concentrations of chemicals are unlikely to produce realistic data on toxicity. In the CONTEST project, 19 biotests were evaluated using a model contaminated sediment from the Baltic Sea. Most of the biotests applied showed concentration-dependent toxicity related to the degree of chemical pollution measured in the test sediment with some variability in the sensitivity of the test organism and the endpoint. The different biotests were analysed according to specially designed assessment criteria, and the results are foreseen to be useful for end-user groups including environmental authorities, private companies and industries, environmental laboratories, consultants, and the scientific community.

  • Wikström, Helene
    et al.
    SCB.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    SCB.
    Field Burning of Crop Residues2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Emissions of greenhouse gases from field burning of crop residues have been estimated to very low levels in 2002. The emissions of CO and NOx may however be considered as not negligible. Information provided by experts support a decreasing trend of field burning as an agricultural practice, but there are only usable activity data for one single year (1997).

    Due to lack of activity data from beginning of the nineties and very low emission levels, the study concludes that Sweden should report trace gas emissions from field burning of crop residues as not occurring "NO" in the emission inventories.

  • Public defence: 2018-05-18 09:00 Rosénsalen, Uppsala
    Eriksson, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Prognostic Factors for Death in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumours2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tumours in the small intestine are rare compared to those in other gastrointestinal organs. Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (SI-NETs) are the most common small bowel tumours with an annual incidence of 0.3-1.7 per 100 000 persons. They are characterised by their usually indolent nature and, even though many patients present with metastatic disease, survival is favourable compared to most other gastrointestinal malignancies. The principal aim of this thesis was to establish prognostic factors over the entire life span of patients with SI-NETs. Paper I confirmed the known prognostic factors of metastatic and symptomatic disease as preoperative prognostic factors. In this paper, we also showed that patients with symptomatic Stage IV disease are the most likely patients to die from their SI-NET. Patients who undergo surgery in an emergency setting fared better than patients who had elective surgery and this can possibly be explained by patients having less advanced disease in emergency procedures.  Paper II focused on the perioperative period, during which liver metastases and peritoneal carcinomatosis stood out as the most important prognostic factors. A macroscopically radical surgery had a positive prognostic impact, as did radical locoregional surgery (LRS). In univariable analysis, LRS was a positive prognostic factor regardless of TNM stage. In Paper III, the specific findings that had prognostic impacts in the postoperative period were the negative impacts of carcinoid heart disease and non-radical secondary surgery.  The occurrence of a second malignancy seemed to have positive prognostic value but was most likely a result of study design. Paper IV studied expression patterns seen on immunohistochemistry of primary and metastatic tissue sections from the primary operation in 40 patients.  In this study, low TFF3 expression in primary tumours was correlated to decreased survival. We also proposed a dual mechanism for TFF3 in the dedifferentiation of SI-NETs based on the finding of high TFF3 expressions in metastatic tissue. The expression of mindin and ACTG2 was higher in G2 tumours and we suggested that mindin played a role as an indirect promoter of proliferation and cell migration. Finally, in Paper V, we calculated the mean annual incidence of clinical and subclinical SI-NETs from autopsy material comprised of the very high number of autopsies from the Malmö region between the years 1970 and 1982. The total mean annual incidence of SI-NETs was 5.7 per 100 000 and males were more likely to harbour a SI-NET than females. In this material, 40% of those with a SI-NET had at least one other malignancy, which constitutes a more than three-fold increased rate of synchronous malignancies in SI-NET cases.

  • Mårtensson, Maria
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Drömmar om något bättre: Om managementmodeller, mätningar och människor2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For several years I have, from a management control perspective, followed the development and application of several popular management models, for example, the knowledge management, balanced scorecard, and intellectual capital models. This thesis, comprising four papers and an extended covering paper, contributes to the management control field by discussing and problematizing management models and how they describe humans by means of measurement.

    This thesis thus does not emphasize the various possibilities for measurement, but rather how measurement is becoming important and what measurement processes might accomplish. Confidence in measurements is great, and the literature often argues for their importance. Furthermore, there is extensive discussion of what factors should be measured and how they should be measured. However, adages such as ‘What gets measured gets managed’ are rarely discussed or problematized.

    The dream of better visualizing humans in organizational management models is sometimes expressed in powerful terms, both poetic and dreamlike. If only humans were better visualized, the value-creation process would become more understandable, benefiting everyone and burnishing the image of the good organization. However, it sometimes seems as though this initial dream has become blurred, and measurement per se has tended to overshadow the initial vision. In that case, management models become not just tools, means to attaining the dream, but gradually become ends in themselves.

    There seems to be a contradiction between the idea of visualizing humans in organizational management models and the results of these models. Paradoxically, these management models are not necessarily making people visible – as was intended; rather, the risk is that they may actually make people less visible, or even invisible. Humans have become bare numbers, and where there is no feedback to ‘flesh and blood’ (i.e., humans), measurements risk losing their purpose. The question remains whether humans are actually made more visible by the measurements used in ‘new’ management models, or whether organizations risk rendering humans invisible and reducing them to objects.

  • Widén-Nilsson, Elin
    et al.
    Executive, Universitet, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Westerberg, Ida
    Executive, Forskningsinstitut, IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Osäkerhetsanalys av kvävenettobelastning (PLC5)2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sverige rapporterade ett totalt utsläpp av 120 000 ton kväve till havet år 2006 i den så kallade PLC5-rapporteringen, Pollution Load Compilation 5, till HELCOM. I rapporteringen delas kvävebelastningen upp på olika källor, havsbassänger, samt på antropogen belastning och bakgrundsbelastning. Dessutom rapporteras både bruttobelastningen och nettobelastningen efter retention i sjöar och vattendrag. Källorna är jordbruk, skog, hygge, myr, öppen mark, fjäll, dagvatten, enskilda avlopp, kommunala avloppsreningsverk av olika storlek samt industrier. Beräk-ningarna är gjorda med Tekniskt Beräkningssystem Vatten, TBV, och baserade på nationellt tillgänglig information om de olika källorna, samt viss information från Finland och Norge om källorna i gränsvattendragen. Även om bästa möjliga indata använts i beräkningen, finns bitvis stora osäkerheter i dessa indata. Osäkerheten i bruttobelastningen och retentionsberäkningarna har tidigare studerats i några ut-valda avrinningsområden. Denna studie fokuserar på den resulterande osäkerheten i nettobelastningen på den nationella skalan.

    För varje typ av indata till beräkningssystemet TBV togs en osäkerhetsfördelning fram. Därefter gjordes 27 800 Monte Carlo-beräkningar med TBV där olika in-datavärden valdes slumpmässigt från osäkerhetsfördelningarna. Osäkerhetsfördel-ningarna för de olika indata togs fram genom liknande metodik som i de tidigare osäkerhetsstudierna för utvalda avrinningsområden, men i denna studie har nya fördelningar för vattenföringen och retentionen använts. Osäkerhetsfördelningen i vattenföringen togs fram genom att jämföra uppmätt och beräknad vattenföring vid 30 slumpmässigt utvalda vattenföringsstationer. Osäkerheten i retentionen beror av vattenföringen, men eftersom denna samvariation inte är tillräckligt känd antogs en triangulär osäkerhetsfördelning om ±12 procentenheter baserat på en tidigare stu-die. Resultatet analyserades för totalbelastning och källfördelning på den nationella skalan. För första gången gjordes även en jämförelse mellan den med TBV beräk-nade nettobelastningen, och belastningen för år 1985–2006 från uppmätta data för 39 flodmynningar.

    Flera av de ingående osäkerhetsfördelningarna har en övervikt mot högre värden jämfört med PLC5. Detta resulterar i att den Monte Carlo-beräknade totalbelast-ningen från Sverige blev 131 000 till 137 400 ton kväve/år (femte och 95:e per-centilen). Det är högre än PLC5-belastningen på 120 000 ton kväve/år. Jordbruk, skog (inklusive hygge) och dagvatten hade alla nationellt sett en högre beräknad belastning jämfört med PLC5, medan övriga källor varierade mer symmetriskt kring PLC5-värdet.

    Det är förväntat att jordbruket och skogen ger en större belastning än vad som be-räknats i PLC5. Förutom osäkerheten i kväveläckaget från jordbruks- och skogs-mark bidrog även osäkerheten i vattenföringen och markanvändningen till den högre belastningen. Osäkerheten i markanvändningen är troligtvis överskattad eftersom jordbruksarealerna och hyggesarealerna i PLC5 är tagna från bättre kart-underlag än de alternativa markanvändningar från Svenska Marktäckedata som användes i denna osäkerhetsstudie. Vissa kända osäkerheter i jordbruksläckaget 7

    och skogstyphalten har däremot inte kunnat representeras fullt ut i osäkerhetsana-lysen. Jordbruksläckaget är underskattat eftersom det tolkas som totalkväveläck-age, utan tillägg för läckage av organiskt kväve, men denna osäkerhet inkluderades inte i jordbruksläckaget eftersom sambandet mellan jordart och organiskt kvä-veläckage inte är utrett. För skogsmark har nya studier visat på en underskattning av skogstyphalterna i särskilt södra Sverige. I denna studie användes en triangulär osäkerhetsfördelning för skogstyphalten där maxvärdet var +64 % av PLC5-värdet i sydöstra Sverige. Ännu högre värden hade kunnat antas och i södra Sverige hade det varit rimligt med minimivärden som ligger närmare PLC5 än de -23 % som antogs i denna studie.

    Jämförelsen med kvävebelastningen från data från 39 flodmynningar år 1985–2006 visade att PLC5-belastningen ofta låg något över medianbelastningen i Bottenviken och norra delen av Bottenhavet, medan det från Indalsälven och söderut var vanli-gare att PLC5-belastningen låg något under medianbelastningen i flodmynnings-data. Variationen i flodmynningsdata mellan olika år är dock stor och denna variat-ion var oftast större än spridningen i resultatet från Monte Carlo-beräkningarna

  • Lomnytska, Marta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health. Karolinska Inst, Inst Womens & Childrens Hlth, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Canc Ctr Karolinska, Dept Oncol & Pathol, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pinto, Rui
    Imperial Coll London, MRC PHE Ctr Environm & Hlth, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, St Marys Campus,Norfolk Pl, London W2 1PG, England..
    Becker, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Canc Ctr Karolinska, Dept Oncol & Pathol, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Engström, Ulla
    Ludwig Inst Canc Res Ltd, Box 595, SE-75124 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, Sonja
    NeoProteomics AB, Canc Ctr Karolinska, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Björklund, Christina
    NeoProteomics AB, Canc Ctr Karolinska, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Templin, Markus
    Univ Tubingen, NMI Nat & Med Sci Inst, D-72770 Reutlingen, Germany..
    Bergstrand, Jan
    AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Royal Inst Technol, Dept Appl Phys, Expt Biomol Phys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Xu, Lei
    AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Royal Inst Technol, Dept Appl Phys, Expt Biomol Phys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Widengren, Jerker
    AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Royal Inst Technol, Dept Appl Phys, Expt Biomol Phys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Epstein, Elisabeth
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Womens & Childrens Hlth, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, SE-11883 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Franzen, Bo
    Karolinska Inst, Canc Ctr Karolinska, Dept Oncol & Pathol, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;NeoProteomics AB, Canc Ctr Karolinska, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Auer, Gert
    Karolinska Inst, Canc Ctr Karolinska, Dept Oncol & Pathol, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;NeoProteomics AB, Canc Ctr Karolinska, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Platelet protein biomarker panel for ovarian cancer diagnosis2018In: BIOMARKER RESEARCH, ISSN 2050-7771, Vol. 6, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Platelets support cancer growth and spread making platelet proteins candidates in the search for biomarkers.

    Methods: Two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis, Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA), Western blot, DigiWest.

    Results: PLS-DA of platelet protein expression in 2D gels suggested differences between the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages III-IV of ovarian cancer, compared to benign adnexal lesions with a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 88%. A PLS-DA-based model correctly predicted 7 out of 8 cases of FIGO stages I-II of ovarian cancer after verification by western blot. Receiver-operator curve (ROC) analysis indicated a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 76% at cut-off >0.5 (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.831, p < 0.0001) for detecting these cases. Validation on an independent set of samples by DigiWest with PLS-DA differentiated benign adnexal lesions and ovarian cancer, FIGO stages III-IV, with a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 83%.

    Conclusion: We identified a group of platelet protein biomarker candidates that can quantify the differential expression between ovarian cancer cases as compared to benign adnexal lesions.

  • Westerberg, Ida
    et al.
    Executive, Forskningsinstitut, IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Mårtensson, Kristina
    Executive, Universitet, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Schmieder, Frank
    Executive, Universitet, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Widén-Nilsson, Elin
    Executive, Universitet, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Ejhed, Helene
    Executive, Forskningsinstitut, IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Andrist-Rangel, Ylva
    SCB.
    Johnsson, Holger
    Executive, Universitet, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Blombäck, Karin
    Executive, Universitet, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Utveckling av indata för belastningsberäkningar med avseende på kvalitet och skala inklusive delning av produktionsområde 62013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den mängd näringsämnen som transporteras från Sveriges yta och belastar havet utgör ett viktigt beslutsunderlag för nationell och internationell vattenförvaltning. Den mest omfat-tande beräkningen av kväve- och fosforbelastningen på havet, Pollution Load Compilat-ion (PLC) periodical, utförs med 5–6 års mellanrum. Beräkningarna utfördes senast för år 2006 (PLC5). Nästkommande PLC Periodical-rapportering, PLC6, kommer att utföras för år 2014 och det är föreslaget att beräkningarna ska utföras med en högre geografisk upplösning (vattenförekomst) än de tidigare PLC5-beräkningarna (delavrinningsområde).

    Resultaten från PLC5 används inom den lokala vattenförvaltningen för delavrinningsom-råden, även om de från början var avsedda att enbart användas på en större skala på grund av begränsningar i data- och modellunderlaget. Havs- och vattenmyndigheten har begärt en utredning av hur underlag och beräkningar till HELCOM PLC6 kan förbättras i kvali-tet och skala för att även uppfylla behov av underlag till vattenmyndigheternas rapporte-ring enligt Vattenförvaltningsförordningen. För att bättre kunna använda PLC-data på lokal skala har Vattenmyndigheten för Norra Östersjön tidigare uttryckt önskemål om att dela läckageregion 6 (SCBs produktionsområde 6, PO6) i två regioner för att bättre mot-svara de produktionsskillnader som finns inom jordbruket i regionen.

    En analys av effekten av att dela region 6, Mälar- och Hjälmarbygden, i två delregioner har gjorts. En region, region 61, utgjordes av området runt Mälaren och Hjälmaren och region 62 var den övriga delen av region 6. Region 61 hade högre gödslings- och skörde-nivå, lägre avrinning, mindre andel vall och större andel clay än region 62. I arbetet har beräkningsmetoden inklusive kriterier och antaganden som beskrevs i PLC5-beräkningen använts (PLC5-metoden). Påverkan av olika gödslings- och skördenivåer, avrinning, grödosammansättning och jordartsammansättning har beräknats. I den regionala skalan var fosforutlakningen högre i region 61 än i region 62. Det var orsakat av större andel grödor och jordarter med hög utlakning jämfört med region 62. På koefficientnivån ob-serverades högre förluster av fosfor i region 61. Detta återspeglar förmodligen inte påver-kan av olika åtgärder i regionerna utan beror framförallt på avrinningsskillnader som ICECREAM-modellen visade hög känslighet för. Utlakningen av kväve (kg N/ha) i reg-ion 62 var högre än i region 61. Det berodde på högre andel jordarter med hög utlakning och högre avrinning än i region 62, trots att grödosammansättningen tydde på högre ut-lakning i region 61. Även koefficienterna var högre i region 62 än i 61. Gödslingsnivån var högre i region 61 men även skördenivån var högre och det gjorde att det var mindre kväve kvar i profilen som riskerade att utlakas.

    Osäkerheten i den beräknade vattenföringen som användes till PLC5 undersöktes för ett antal slumpmässigt utvalda avrinningsområden och visade sig vara större för mindre avrinningsområden jämfört med stora. Osäkerheten i kvävebruttobelastningen från den tidigare Monte Carlo-analysen visade också på större spridning i mindre områden jämfört med stora, ett liknande mönster – men mindre tydligt – kunde också ses för nettobelast-ningen. Erfarenheter från tidigare lokala studier visar att när PLC-data kompletteras och förbättras med lokala data blir överenstämmelsen mellan beräknade och uppmätta halter av kväve och fosfor oftast bättre jämfört med en modelluppsättning enbart baserad på 9

    PLC-data. Det går dock inte att generellt säga vilka data som är viktigast att komplettera med då påverkan från de olika typerna av källor varierar stort lokalt.

    TBV-belastningsresultaten har jämförts med observationsdata för 39 flodmynningar, men några jämförelser med observationsdata för små avrinningsområden av liknande skala som vattenförekomsterna har hittills inte gjorts. Det är därför prioriterat att i samband med PLC6 kvantifiera storleken på avvikelserna mot observationsdata för olika rumsliga skalor och därmed kunna bedöma och klassificera tillförlitligheten i resultaten, samt ge råd om hur dessa bör användas. Analysen av de vattenförings- och vattenkemidata som finns tillgängliga för modellkalibrering och utvärdering visade att få av de tillgängliga vattenföringsstationerna har små tillrinningsområden, medan det finns data över kväve och fosforhalter från fler små områden. Vattenföringsstationerna är väl fördelade över landet, medan tillgängligheten till kväve- och fosforhaltdata varierar mer mellan olika regioner. Det är därför viktigt att, om möjligt, samla in data från mindre avrinningsområ-den för resultatutvärderingen under PLC6.

    Fler rekommendationer för resultatutvärdering och tillförlitlighetsbedömning av PLC6- resultaten diskuteras i denna rapport. En lista över prioriterade områden för förbättring av indata till PLC6-beräkningarna ges i slutet av rapporten tillsammans med en diskussion om framtida behov av datainsamling och nationellt datavärdskap. Källor och indata som inte har någon större betydelse på den nationella skalan kan ha stor lokal inverkan, vilket gör att prioriteringen rör i stort sett alla typer av källor som bidrar till antropogen kväve-och fosforbelastning.

  • Xenia, Trier
    et al.
    Taxvig, Camilla
    Rosenmai, Anna Kjerstine
    Pedersen, Gitte Alsing
    PFAS in paper and board for food contact: Options for risk management of poly- and perfluorinated substances2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly- and perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) are used in paper and board food contact materials (FCMs) and they have been found to be highly persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic. The purpose of the Nordic workshop and of this report is to:* create an overview of the use of PFAS in FCMs of paper and board and of the toxicity and migration into food of the various substances* provide an overview of whether appropriate risk assessments for fluorinated substances exist as a basis for specific regulations or recommendations* provide an overview of whether analytical methods suitable for analysing and regulating the substances are available* discuss the possibility and structure of national regulations or Nordic recommendations for PFAS in FCMs of paper and board.Risk management to reduce the total content of organically bound fluorine in paper and board FCMs is supported.