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  • Axelsson, Owe
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Numerical Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Scientific Computing. Czech Acad Sci, Inst Geon, Ostrava, Czech Republic.
    Neytcheva, Maya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Numerical Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Scientific Computing.
    Liang, Zhao-Zheng
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology. Lanzhou Univ, Sch Math & Stat, Lanzhou, Gansu, Peoples R China.
    Parallel Solution Methods and Preconditioners for Evolution Equations2018In: Mathematical Modelling and Analysis, ISSN 1392-6292, E-ISSN 1648-3510, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 287-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent development of the high performance computer platforms shows a clear trend towards heterogeneity and hierarchy. In order to utilize the computational power, particular attention must be paid to finding new algorithms or adjust existing ones so that they better match the HPC computer architecture. In this work we consider an alternative to classical time-stepping methods based on use of time-harmonic properties and discuss solution approaches that allow efficient utilization of modern HPC resources. The method in focus is based on a truncated Fourier expansion of the solution of an evolutionary problem. The analysis is done for linear equations and it is remarked on the possibility to use two- or multilevel mesh methods for nonlinear problems, which can enable further, even higher degree of parallelization. The arising block matrix system to be solved admits a two-by-two block form with square blocks, for which a very efficient preconditioner exists. It leads to tight eigenvalue bounds for the preconditioned matrix and, hence, to a very fast convergence of a preconditioned Krylov subspace or iterative refinement method. The analytical background is shown as well as some illustrating numerical examples.

  • Public defence: 2018-10-15 13:00 KTH, Kollegiesalen,, Stockholm
    Ahmadi, Zahra
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics. Högskolan i Gävle.
    The role of market orientation in public housing companies:: A study of MO’s effect on construction strategies2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of public housing companies in Sweden is strongly influenced by legal, economic, and demographic changes. The companies long tradition of taking responsibility for customer welfare in living have recently been criticized for excessive dominance over price setting, which is claimed to give them competitive advantages in the housing market. New legislation in 2011 requires financial return on investment, implying increased competition with radical changes for the companies. Because of the law, they find themselves transitioning from the role of being responsible for living conditions in Sweden to having to work in a businesslike manner with increased competition.The purpose of this dissertation is to analyze how the public housing companies’ deal with market orientation constructs and what their impact is on construction strategy choices. Theoretically, the market orientation concept is seen as a tool for companies to create superior value for the customers and influence strategic performance, which is a relationship tested and analyzed in this dissertation.The research was conducted through data collection stages using qualitative and quantitative methods. In the first stage, a qualitative pilot study was conducted with interviews of 15 managers in 11 public housing companies in central Sweden. In the second stage, two quantitative comparative studies of public and private housing companies in declining markets in central Sweden were conducted, collecting data from 23 (22 survey respondents) public and 37 private housing companies (16 respondents). In the third and final stage, two quantitative studies were conducted, collecting data from all 289 public housing companies (165 respondents) in Sweden.Results of the five studies show, firstly, that economic condition in the municipality have a major impact on the housing companies’ construction strategies, causing them to act innovatively in order to create superior customer value. Secondly, market orientation efforts contribute to competitive advantages in growing markets, while weak economic conditions limit the companies’ construction strategy choices in declining markets. After analyzing the link between market orientation constructs and construction strategy in declining markets, results showed that the public housing companies demonstrate higher responsiveness to customer demands compared to the private sector, but these have no effects on construction strategy. Thirdly, the analysis of moderating (external) and mediating (corporate social responsibility) effects on the market orientation and construction strategy relationship confirms that economic conditions in society influence construction strategy planning and decisions. The results of the mediating effects of CSR indicate that environmental and social issues have a positive influence on the market orientation and construction strategy relationship.

  • Gierlinski, Gerard D.
    et al.
    Moab Giants, 112W-SR 313 Moab, Moab, UT 84532 USA;Polish Res Inst, Polish Geol Inst, Rakowiecka 4, PL-00975 Warsaw, Poland.
    Niedzwiedzki, Grzegorz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Lockley, Martin G.
    Moab Giants, 112W-SR 313 Moab, Moab, UT 84532 USA;Univ Colorado Denver, Dinosaur Tracks Museum, POB 173364, Denver, CO 80217 USA.
    Athanassiou, Athanassios
    Ephorate Palaeoanthropol Speleol, Hellen Minist Culture & Sports, Ardittou 34B, GR-11636 Athens, Greece.
    Fassoulas, Charalampos
    Univ Crete, Nat Hist Museum, Iraklion 71409, Greece.
    Dubicka, Zofia
    Univ Warsaw, Fac Geol, Zwirki & Wiguty 93, PL-02089 Warsaw, Poland.
    Boczarowski, Andrzej
    Park Sci & Human Evolut, 1 Maja 10, PL-46040 Krasiejow, Poland;Moab Giants, 112W-SR 313 Moab, Moab, UT 84532 USA;Stowarzyszenie Delta Delta Assoc, Sandomierska 4, PL-27400 Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland;Univ Silesia, Fac Earth Sci, Bedzinska 60, PL-41200 Sosnowiec, Poland.
    Bennett, Matthew R.
    Bournemouth Univ, Inst Studies Landscapes & Human Evolut, Poole BH12 5BB, Dorset, England.
    Ahlberg, Per Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Possible hominin footprints from the late Miocene (c. 5.7 Ma) of Crete?2017In: Proceedings Geological Association, ISSN 0016-7878, Vol. 128, no 5-6, p. 697-710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe late Miocene tetrapod footprints (tracks) from the Trachilos locality in western Crete (Greece), which show hominin-like characteristics. They occur in an emergent horizon within an otherwise marginal marine succession of Messinian age (latest Miocene), dated to approximately 5.7 Ma (million years), just prior to the Messinian Salinity Crisis. The tracks indicate that the trackmaker lacked claws, and was bipedal, plantigrade, pentadactyl and strongly entaxonic. The impression of the large and non-divergent first digit (hallux) has a narrow neck and bulbous asymmetrical distal pad. The lateral digit impressions become progressively smaller so that the digital region as a whole is strongly asymmetrical. A large, rounded ball impression is associated with the hallux. Morphometric analysis shows the footprints to have outlines that are distinct from modern non-hominin primates and resemble those of hominins. The interpretation of these footprints is potentially controversial. The print morphology suggests that the trackmaker was a basal member of the Glade Hominini, but as Crete is some distance outside the known geographical range of pre-Pleistocene hominins we must also entertain the possibility that they represent a hitherto unknown late Miocene primate that convergently evolved human-like foot anatomy.

  • Sarmiento, Luis
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Cellular Autoimmun Unit, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35,CRC 91 10, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden.
    Frisk, Gun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Anagandula, Mahesh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Hodik, Monika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Barchetta, Ilaria
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Cellular Autoimmun Unit, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35,CRC 91 10, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden;Sapienza Univ Rome, Dept Internal Med & Med Specialties, I-00185 Rome, Italy.
    Netanyah, Eitan
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Cellular Autoimmun Unit, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35,CRC 91 10, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden.
    Cabrera-Rode, Eduardo
    Natl Inst Endocrinol, Dept Immunol & Genet Diabet, Havana 10400, Cuba.
    Cilio, Corrado M.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Cellular Autoimmun Unit, Jan Waldenstroms Gata 35,CRC 91 10, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden.
    Echovirus 6 Infects Human Exocrine and Endocrine Pancreatic Cells and Induces Pro-Inflammatory Innate Immune Response2017In: Viruses, ISSN 1999-4915, E-ISSN 1999-4915, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human enteroviruses (HEV), especially coxsackievirus serotype B (CVB) and echovirus (E), have been associated with diseases of both the exocrine and endocrine pancreas, but so far evidence on HEV infection in human pancreas has been reported only in islets and ductal cells. This study aimed to investigate the capability of echovirus strains to infect human exocrine and endocrine pancreatic cells. Infection of explanted human islets and exocrine cells with seven field strains of E6 caused cytopathic effect, virus titer increase and production of HEV protein VP1 in both cell types. Virus particles were found in islets and acinar cells infected with E6. No cytopathic effect or infectious progeny production was observed in exocrine cells exposed to the beta cell-tropic strains of E16 and E30. Endocrine cells responded to E6, E16 and E30 by upregulating the transcription of interferon-induced with helicase C domain 1 (IF1H1), 2'-5;-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), interferon-beta (IFN-beta), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5). Echovirus 6, but not E16 or E30, led to increased transcription of these genes in exocrine cells. These data demonstrate for the first time that human exocrine cells represent a target for E6 infection and suggest that certain HEV serotypes can replicate in human pancreatic exocrine cells, while the pancreatic endocrine cells are permissive to a wider range of HEV.

  • Public defence: 2018-10-22 13:00 N300, Naturvetarhuset, Umeå, Sweden
    Brembilla, Christian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Efficiency factors for space heating system in buildings2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis focuses on the efficiency of the space heating system. In particular, the efficiency factors measure the efficiency of thermal zone. The efficiency factors measures how the energy is used in a space heating. Efficiency factors relatively close to one mean that the energy is used "efficiently'', by contrast, efficiency factors close to the zero mean that the majority of the energy is lost to the outdoor environment. This method for the appraisal of space heating performance reads as if it is apparently simple and intuitive. In reality, the efficiency factor method has several pitfalls.

    The thesis provides tools, insights and remarks on how to apply the efficiency factor method to space heating systems equipped with hydronic panel radiator and floor heating respectively. Models of the latter heaters together with the multilayer wall were developed and validated to understand the reliability of their predictions. The hypothesis is that the heat stored in the building thermal mass and heaters plays a role in defining the building thermal performance and as a result in the appraisal of the efficiency factors. The validation is based on the sensitivity bands of the models' predictions. The heaters were tested in in a thermostatic booth simulator. Benefits and drawbacks of each model were highlighted to increase awareness of their use in the engineering fields. The results showed how the models accounting for the heat stored performed the charging phase. In addition, results of how the multilayer wall delayed and damped down the heat wave coming from the outdoor environment were presented with the appraisal of the decrement factor and time delay of the indoor temperature. The results of the efficiency factors analysis reveal how the weather affects the efficiency of each locality situated in cold climates. Lastly how different control strategies impact on the efficiency factors of space heating and its distribution system. To conclude, this study highlights the paradoxes around the efficiency factor method. The thesis proposes how such factors have to be interpreted by researchers and scientists tackling the lack of information around this topic.

  • Rosenblatt, Robert
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm South Gen Hosp, Dept Urol, Stockholm, Sweden;Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci Urol & Androl, S-90185 Umea, Sweden.
    Johansson, Markus
    Sundsvall Hosp, Dept Urol, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Alamdari, Farhood
    Vastmanland Hosp, Dept Urol, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Sidiki, Alexander
    Lanssjukhuset Ryhov, Dept Urol, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Holmström, Benny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Hansson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Vasko, Janos
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umea, Sweden.
    Marits, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Unit Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Unit Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Winqvist, Ola
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Unit Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sherif, Amir
    Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci Urol & Androl, S-90185 Umea, Sweden.
    Sentinel node detection in muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer is feasible after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in all pT stages: a prospective multicenter report2017In: World journal of urology, ISSN 0724-4983, E-ISSN 1433-8726, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 921-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine whether sentinel node detection (SNd) in muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer (MIBC) can be performed in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and determine whether SNd is feasible in all pT stages, including pT0. Previous published series of SNd in MIBC have not included patients undergoing NAC, and systematic reports of pT0 patients w/wo NAC were absent. Translational immunological tumor research on MIBC focusing on SNd, in the era of NAC, requires technical feasibility. Additionally, SNd in MIBC requests further evaluations as a method for nodal staging. Ninety-nine patients with suspected urothelial MIBC were prospectively selected from six urological centers. After TUR-B and primary staging, 65 MIBC patients qualified for radical cystectomy. Precystectomy staging was cT2a-T4aN0M0, including 47 NAC patients and 18 chemo-na < ve patients. All 65 patients underwent intraoperative SNd by peritumoral injection of 80 Mbq Technetium and Geiger probe detection. Postcystectomy staging was pT0-T4aN0-N2M0. SNs were defined by two calculations, SNdef1 and SNdef2. Totally 1063 lymph nodes were removed (total SNs; 222-227). NAC patients with pT0 (n = 24) displayed a true positive detection in 91.7 % by either SNdef, with a median of 3.0 SNs. NACpT > 0 patients had a true positive detection in 87 % (SNdef1) and 91.3 % (SNdef2). In a univariate analysis, patient group neither NAC nor tumor downstaging influenced detection rates, regardless of SN definition. In total eight patients, 4/22 metastatic nodes were SNs while 18/22 were non-SNs. Sentinel node detection in MIBC is feasible also in NAC patients, regardless of pT stage. SNd played no role in nodal staging.

  • Eckhardt, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine.
    Santillán, Dimitri
    Universidad Central del Ecuador, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Quito, Ecuador.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Forsberg, Birger C.
    Karolinska Institute, Department of Public Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Kärna, Linköping.
    Universal Health Coverage in Rural Ecuador: A Cross-sectional Study of Perceived Emergencies2018In: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1936-900X, E-ISSN 1936-9018, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 889-900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In many low- and middle-income countries emergency care is provided anywhere in the health system; however, no studies to date have looked at which providers are chosen by patients with perceived emergencies. Ecuador has universal health coverage that includes emergency care. However, earlier research indicates that patients with emergencies tend to seek private care. Our primary research questions were these: What is the scope of perceived emergencies?; What is their nature?; and What is the related healthcare-seeking behavior? Secondary objectives were to study determinants of healthcare-seeking behavior, compare health expenditure with expenditure from the past ordinary illness, and measure the prevalence of catastrophic health expenditure related to perceived emergencies.less thanbr /greater thanMethods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 210 households in a rural region of northwestern Ecuador. The households were sampled with two-stage cluster sampling and represent an estimated 20% of the households in the region. We used two structured, pretested questionnaires. The first questionnaire collected demographic and economic household data, expenditure data on the past ordinary illness, and presented our definition of perceived emergency. The second recorded the number of emergency events, symptoms, further case description, healthcare-seeking behavior, and health expenditure, which was defined as being catastrophic when it exceeded 40% of a household's ability to pay.less thanbr /greater thanResults: The response rate was 85% with a total of 74 reported emergency events during the past year (90/1,000 inhabitants). We further analyzed the most recent event in each household (n=54). Private, for-profit providers, including traditional healers, were chosen by 57.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] [44-71%]). Public providers treated one third of the cases. The mean health expenditure per event was $305.30 United States dollars (USD), compared to $135.80 USD for the past ordinary illnesses. Catastrophic health expenditure was found in 24.4% of households.less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Our findings suggest that the provision of free health services may not be sufficient to reach universal health coverage for patients with perceived emergencies. Changes in the organization of public emergency departments and improved financial protection for emergency patients may improve the situation.

  • Mustafa, Arshi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Comparative Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology. Uppsala University.
    Cetinkaya, Dicle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Cheng, Xi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Thörnqvist, Per-Ove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Winberg, Svante
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Spiegeldanio: A bold and aggressive fish but what if it loses a fight?2018In: Measuring Behavior 2018: Conference Proceedings / [ed] Grant R, Allen T, Spink A, Sullivan M, 2018, p. 24-26Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Aggression is a competition based survival strategy. The spiegeldanio (spd) strain of zebrafish (Danio rerio), which has a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1a, is bolder and more aggressive than the wild type fish [1]. Usually a socially dominant fish has preferential access to food, mate and shelter, and shows very characteristic postures like erection of the fins. It is also aggressive frequently biting, striking and chasing the subordinate fish as well as threatening its own mirror image in mirror tests [2]. However, what happens when an already known bold and dominant fish like spiegeldanio loses a dyadic fight. Spd fish are more aggressive in mirror tests, attacking their mirror image more frequently than wild type conspecifics. However, are they more aggressive in dyadic fights? Do they show an inhibition of aggressive behaviour when losing fights, the typical loser effect? The behavioural inhibition observed in animals losing fights for dominance is at least in part believed to be mediated by an activation of the brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system. Do spd fish show a typical increase in brain 5-HT activity in response to social subordination? Dopamine (DA), on the other hand, is associated with aggression and social dominance. What are the effects of winning and losing fights for social dominance in spd fish? In the present study these questions were addressed in an attempt to increase or understanding of the control of agonistic behaviour and social stress.

    Animals and Methods

    The Spd strain of zebrafish were raised and reared at 27°C in an Aquaneering Zebrafish system at Uppsala University Biomedical Center. The animals were kept at a 14:10 h of light-dark photoperiod. The water used in the fish tanks was Uppsala municipal tap water (pH 7.2-7.6) of which 10% was exchanged daily. Fish were fed twice daily with Tropical energy food (Aquatic Nature, Belgium) and Artemia (Platinum Grade 0, Argentemia, Argent, Aquaculture, Redmond, USA). The use of animals was approved by the Uppsala Animal Ethical Committee (permit Dnr 55/13) and followed the guidelines of the Swedish Legislation on Animal Experimentation (Animal Welfare Act SFS1998:56), and the European Union Directive on the Protection of Animals Used for Scientific Purposes (Directive 2010/63/EU). The fish were transferred to the individual compartments of dimension 29 x 7.5 x 20 cm (length x breadth x height) in experimental tanks used for dyadic interaction and allowed to recover in isolation overnight. These experimental tanks were made from poly methyl methacrylate plastic and each tank was equipped with a submerged pump with filter (Eheim, typ 2006020, pumping capacity 1/h180, made in China), a heater (Sera aquarium, 25W, made in EU) and an air stone, all of which were placed at the back of the tank separated from the fish by a white perforated PVC screen (Figure 1). The setup of the arena was such that the two fish (1 dyadic pair) had an olfactory but not any visual cue of each other before the dyadic interaction. In the mirror test the fish were made to fight against the mirror image that was displayed in the mirror which was pasted on the wall of the arena. Prior to the beginning of the dyadic contest the mirror was covered with a black plexiglas slide cover. The experiment was carried out in the following sequence: The fishes were netted out and placed in the arena in the compartments A and B (Figure 1) and separated from each other by a partition. The cover of the mirror (opaque black PVC partition, Figure 1) was then removed and fish were made to interact with their own mirror image for 10 minutes. Then the slide covering the mirror was pulled down and the middle separating partition was pulled out and the fish were given an opportunity to fight. Dyadic fight was recorded two times, morning and evening on day one with the help of a video filming camera. Then next day in the morning the dyadic fight was again recorded. During the dyadic interaction the two fishes indulged in mutual display of aggressive behaviour which was followed by chasing and biting attacks performed by the dominant fish over the subordinate fish. Then middle partition was introduced again. Fish were given 6 minutes to habituate and the cover from the mirror was removed and fishes were again allowed to interact with their mirror image. Again the mirror was covered and the fish was allowed to get involved in the dyadic fight.  Then each fish was taken out from the compartment at the same time and sacrificed for sampling of brain tissue.

    The three dimensional model of tank used in the behavioural tests I) Tank used for mirror test and for dyadic fight later on. It consists of two compartments, A and B. The movable partition separating the two compartments would be removed during the dyadic fight test. Compartment C is located at the back and is separated from the compartment A and B with the help of white coloured opaque perforated partition. It contains an air stone (for diffusion of air bubbles), heater (27°C), water pump (for circulation of water) and a drainage tube to exchange the water. II) Diagram of the settings used for dyadic interactions. The mirrors are covered with the help of a black PVC slide and the middle partition is pulled out. This allows the fish to interact.

    Brain dissection and analysis of monaoamines and monoamine metabolites

    Brains were divided into forebrain (telencephalon and diencephalon), optic tectum and the rest (here denoted brain stem). The frozen brains were homogenised in 4% (w/v) ice-cold perchloric acid containing 100 ng/ml 3, 4-dihydroxybenzylamine (DHBA, the internal standard) using a Sonifier cell disruptor B-30 (Branson Ultrasonics, Danbury, CT, USA) and were immediately put on dry ice. Subsequently, the homogenised samples were thawed and centrifuged at 15,000 rpm for 10 min at 4o C. The supernatant was used for high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC), analysing the monoamines dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) as well as the DA metabolite 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and the 5-HT metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), as described by Øverli et al. [3]. In short, the HPLC-EC system consisted of a solvent delivery system model 582 (ESA, Bedford, MA, USA), an autoinjector Midas type 830 (Spark Holland, Emmen, the Netherlands), a reverse phase column (Reprosil-Pur C18-AQ 3 µm, 100 mm × 4 mm column, Dr. Maisch HPLC GmbH, Ammerbuch-Entringen, Germany) kept at 40° C and an ESA 5200 Coulochem II EC detector (ESA, Bedford, MA, USA) with two electrodes at reducing and oxidizing potentials of -40 mV and +320 mV. A guarding electrode with a potential of +450 mV was employed before the analytical electrodes to oxidize any contaminants. The mobile phase consisted of 75 mM sodium phosphate, 1.4 mM sodium octyl sulphate and 10 µM EDTA in deionised water containing 7 % acetonitrile brought to pH 3.1 with phosphoric acid. The quantification of samples was done by comparing it with standard solutions of known concentrations. DHBA was used as an internal standard to correct for recovery with the help of HPLC software ClarityTM (Data Apex Ltd, Czech Republic). The serotonergic and dopaminergic activity was measured as the ratio of 5-HIAA/5-HT and DOPAC/DA respectively. The brain monoamines were normalized with respect to brain protein weights which were determined with Bicinchoninic acid protein determination kit (Sigma Aldrich, Sweden). The assay was read at a wavelength of 570 nm with the help of a plate reader (Labsystems multiskan 352, Labsystems Thermo Fisher Scientific).

    Results

    A clear dominant subordinate hierarchy was established within 30 minutes of dyadic interaction. The number of aggressive acts (bites, strikes and chases) performed by the looser fish decreased significantly from the first dyadic fight to the last (i.e. the fourth) dyadic fight. For the winner fish the number of aggressive acts performed against a mirror during the second mirror test increased or remained same as before after winning a dyadic fight, whereas for the looser fish it decreased significantly. The results from the present study indicate that subordinate fish have higher 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in the optic tectum as compared to the dominants. More results from this study would be presented at the conference.

    References

    1. Norton W, Bally-Cuif L (2010) Adult zebrafish as a model organism for behavioural genetics. BMC Neurosci. 11:90.

    2. Rowland WJ (1999) Studying visual cues in fish behaviour: a review of ethological techniques. Env Biol Fishes. 56:285-305.

    3. Øverli Ø, Harris CA, Winberg S (1999) Short-term effects of fights for social dominance and the establishment of dominant-subordinate relationships on brain monoamines and cortisol in rainbow trout. Brain Behav Evol. 54:263-275.

     

     

  • Yang, Weijia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity. Wuhan Univ, State Key Lab Water Resources & Hydropower Engn S, Wuhan, Hubei, Peoples R China; Wuhan Univ, State Key Lab Water Resources & Hydropower Engn S, Wuhan, Hubei, Peoples R China; Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Div Environm Sci, Oak Ridge, TN USA.
    Sundqvist, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity. Vattenfall R&D, Älvkarleby, Sweden.
    Saarinen, Linn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity. Vattenfall R&D, Älvkarleby, Sweden.
    Witt, Adam
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Div Environm Sci, Oak Ridge, TN USA.
    Smith, Brennan
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Div Environm Sci, Oak Ridge, TN USA.
    Yang, Jiandong
    Wuhan Univ, State Key Lab Water Resources & Hydropower Engn S, Wuhan, Hubei, Peoples R China.
    Lundin, Urban
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Burden on hydropower units for short-term balancing of renewable power systems2018In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 2633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a general need to change hydropower operational regimes to balance the growing contribution of variable renewable energy sources in power systems. Quantifying the burden on generation equipment is increasingly uncertain and difficult. Here, we propose a framework combining technical and economic indicators to analyze primary frequency control (PFC) on a timescale of seconds. We develop a model integrating hydraulic, mechanical, and electrical subsystems to characterize efficiency loss, wear and fatigue, regulation mileage, and frequency quality. We evaluate burden relief strategies under three idealized remuneration schemes for PFC, inspired by those used in Sweden, the USA, and China, respectively. We show how burden and compensation vary under future scenarios of renewable power systems. Our framework can be used by producers to develop favorable operation strategies that reduce burden and increase economic value, and by transmission system operators to provide insights on the relation between incentive structures and regulating performance.

  • Aaboud, M.
    et al.
    LPTPM, Oujda, Morocco;Univ Mohamed Premier, Fac Sci, Oujda, Morocco.
    Bergeås Kuutmann, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bokan, Petar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics. Georg August Univ, Phys Inst 2, Gottingen, Germany.
    Brenner, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellert, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ferrari, Arnaud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Gradin, P. O. Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Isacson, Max F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Mårtensson, Mikael U.F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Öhman, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Sales De Bruin, Pedro H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Zwalinski, L.
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Search for Higgs boson decays into pairs of light (pseudo)scalar particles in the gamma gamma jj final state in pp collisions at root s=13 TeV with the ATLAS detector2018In: Physics Letters B, ISSN 0370-2693, E-ISSN 1873-2445, Vol. 782, p. 750-767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Letter presents a search for exotic decays of the Higgs boson to a pair of new (pseudo) scalar particles, H -> aa, where the a particle has a mass in the range 20-60 GeV, and where one of the a bosons decays into a pair of photons and the other to a pair of gluons. The search is performed in event samples enhanced in vector-boson fusion Higgs boson production by requiring two jets with large invariant mass in addition to the Higgs boson candidate decay products. The analysis is based on the full dataset of pp collisions at root s = 13 TeV recorded in 2015 and 2016 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36.7 fb(-1). The data are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions and an upper limit at the 95% confidence level is placed on the production cross section times the branching ratio for the decay H -> aa -> gamma gamma gg. This limit ranges from 3.1 pb to 9.0 pb depending on the mass of the a boson.

  • Public defence: 2018-10-12 13:00 Nyqvistsalen, Karlstad
    Magnuson, Mark
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies (from 2013).
    A Swedish dilemma: Aging during the search for a national insurance, 1884-19132018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-wage holders made up a significant portion of Sweden’s population in 1900. Yet, there are surprisingly few studies covering their formative role in the universal coverage of Sweden’s Pension Act of 1913. Yet, how are historians to discern nostalgic rhetoric of reformers from normative rural elderly household structures without contextual evidence? The greatest challenge to defining what was normative has been the search for singular, national household narrative despite the local and regional nature of earlier welfare and the processes of monetarization used to innovate it.

    This study lifts uneven monetarization as an underlying national insurance dilemma. This dilemma shifted focus from workers to a universal system due to elderly incomes remaining divided between wage-labor and intergenerational household-based forms. It supports and expands on prior literature suggesting that the variation in family and household income that altered the formation of a single state workers insurance, likely prevented a poor-relief crisis prior to state reforms. Yet this study claims that families did not address household shortcomings through traditional means but collaborating with the Swedish state, which was actively nationalizing financial services through the postal service extended to municipalities. Until the financial innovations of the postal services, money-exchange and formal banking was slow to integrate beyond central places, thus limiting life-cycle strategies to land based.

    In addressing Gräsmark, Värmland as a “best-case” smallholder-dominated municipality, the study reverses earlier persistent beliefs that emigration and aging were national problems -and not solutions. Gräsmark shows evidence of the transitional effects of adult-child mass migration and household adaptions to life-cycle income strategies though expanding debt. Likewise, the results highlight the need for income flexibility dependent on age cohorts as well as spatial-temporal variation in order to avoid a local poor-relief crisis during the late 19th and early 20th century.

  • Westelius, Alf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cöster, Mathias
    Campus Gotland, Uppsala universitet.
    Prissättning och prismodeller2018In: Controllerhandboken / [ed] Fredrik Nilsson, Nils-Göran Olve, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, 11, p. 318-342Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Organisationers prissättning påverkar mer än bara deras intäkter och kostnader. Den påverkar också relationerna till såväl kunder som leverantörer – och ibland även de interna relationerna. I och med att prissättningen speglar och befäster dessa relationer, är den en del av organisationers styrning. Den här strategiska betydelsen av prissättning är det dock många organisationer som bortser från. Prissättning reduceras ofta till en fråga om prisnivå (högt eller lågt pris) eller om värde för kunderna och deras betalningsvilja.Prismodeller är ett koncept för att fördjupa analysen av hur prissättning strategiskt påverkar organisationer. Ordet har på senare år börjat användas även i media, särskilt när företag uppfattas ta betalt på ett okonventionellt vis. I definitionen av prismodeller utgår vi i det här kapitlet från Olve et al. (2013, s. 11) som skriver: ”En prismodell gäller för en viss affär. Den beskriver just den uppgörelsen: vad ingår, och vad styr betalningen.” Prissättningen påverkar både säljares och köpares beteende. I det här sammanhanget har controllern en roll att spela genom att hjälpa till att förstå effekterna av existerande prismodeller ochpå vilket sätt organisationen kan utveckla nya. Med detta som utgångspunkt beskriver vi i det här kapitlet betydelsen av strategiskt förankrad prissättning. Vi gör det genom att i avsnitt 11.2 ge tre exempel på innovativa prismodeller som påverkar såväl värdeerbjudande som affärsmodeller. Därefter beskriver vi i avsnitt 11.3 kontexten för prismodeller, genomatt sätta dem i relation till ett företags affärsmodell och dess affärsekologi. Avslutningsvis diskuterar vi i avsnitt 11.4 på vilket sätt analys av prismodeller kan vara ett användbart verktyg i controllerarbetet.

  • Rud, Jakob Nymann
    et al.
    Hørmann, Morten
    Hammervold, Vibeke
    Ásmundsson, Ragnar
    Georgiev, Ivo
    Dyer, Gillian
    Andersen, Simon Brøndum
    Jessen, Jes Erik
    Kvorning, Pia
    Brødsted, Meta Reimer
    Energy in the West Nordics and the Arctic: Case Studies2018Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This project explores the energy systems and their development towards 2035 in the West Nordic areas and the Arctic. The objective of the project was to contribute to a knowledge base that can be shared and used in developing a sustainable and competitive energy systems that fulfil the goals and obligations for 2035 on climate, emissions and renewable shares. “Energy systems” in this case covers the potential for different renewable energy resources, infrastructure, the demand for energy in different sectors, and relevant policies.

    Along with the scenario analysis, five case studies have been developed: land transport; a small hybrid energy system in Igaliku, Greenland; electrification of fishing vessels; tourism; and the future energy system in Svalbard.

  • Adlarson, Patrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Augustyniak, W.
    Natl Ctr Nucl Res, Dept Nucl Phys, Ul Hoza 69, PL-00681 Warsaw, Poland.
    Bardan, W.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Bashkanov, M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Sch Phys & Astron, James Clerk Maxwell Bldg,Peter Guthrie Tait Rd, Edinburgh EH9 3FD, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Bergmann, F. S.
    Westfal Wilhelms Univ Munster, Inst Kernphys, Wilhelm Klemm Str 9, D-48149 Munster, Germany.
    Berlowski, M.
    Natl Ctr Nucl Res, High Energy Phys Dept, Ul Hoza 69, PL-00681 Warsaw, Poland.
    Bondar, A.
    SB RAS, Budker Inst Nucl Phys, 11 Akad Lavrentieva Prospect, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia;Novosibirsk State Univ, 2 Pirogova Str, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia.
    Buescher, M.
    Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Inst Laser & Plasmaphys, Univ Str 1, D-40225 Dusseldorf, Germany;Forschungszentrum Julich, Peter Grunberg Inst, PGI Elekt Eigenschaften 6, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Calén, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Ciepal, I.
    Polish Acad Sci, Henryk Niewodniczanski Inst Nucl Phys, Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31342 Krakow, Poland.
    Clement, H.
    Univ Tubingen, Phys Inst, Kepler Ctr Astro & Teilchenphys, Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany;Eberhard Karls Univ Tubingen, Phys Inst, Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany.
    Czerwinski, E.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Demmich, K.
    Westfal Wilhelms Univ Munster, Inst Kernphys, Wilhelm Klemm Str 9, D-48149 Munster, Germany.
    Engels, R.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Erveno, A.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Zent Inst Engn Elekt & Analyt, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Erven, W.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Zent Inst Engn Elekt & Analyt, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Eyrich, W.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Phys Inst, Erwin Rommel Str 1, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany.
    Fedorets, P.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany;Kurchatov Inst, Natl Res Ctr, Inst Theoret & Expt Phys, 25 Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya, Moscow 117218, Russia.
    Foehl, K.
    Kurchatov Inst, Natl Res Ctr, Petersburg Nucl Phys Inst, High Energy Phys Div, 1 Mkr Orlova Roshcha, Gatchina 188300, Leningradskaya, Russia;Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Phys Inst 2, Heinrich Buff Ring 16, D-35392 Giessen, Germany.
    Fransson, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Goldenbaum, F.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Goswami, A.
    Indian Inst Technol Indore, Dept Phys, Khandwa Rd, Indore 453552, Madhya Pradesh, India;Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Grigoryev, K.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Gullstrom, C. -O
    Heijkenskjöld, Filip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Physics Didactics. Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Kernphys, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45, D-55128 Mainz, Germany.
    Hejny, V.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Huesken, N.
    Westfal Wilhelms Univ Munster, Inst Kernphys, Wilhelm Klemm Str 9, D-48149 Munster, Germany.
    Jarczyk, L.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Johansson, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Kamys, B.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Kemmerling, G.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich Ctr Neutron Sci JCNS, D-52425 Julich, Germany;Forschungszentrum Julich, Zent Inst Engn Elekt & Analyt, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Khatri, G.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland;Harvard Univ, Dept Phys, 17 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA.
    Khoukaz, A.
    Westfal Wilhelms Univ Munster, Inst Kernphys, Wilhelm Klemm Str 9, D-48149 Munster, Germany.
    Khreptak, A.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Kirillov, D. A.
    Joint Inst Nucl Res, Veksler & Baldin Lab High Energiy Phys, 6 Joliot Curie, Dubna 141980, Russia.
    Kistryn, S.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Kleines, H.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich Ctr Neutron Sci JCNS, D-52425 Julich, Germany;Forschungszentrum Julich, Zent Inst Engn Elekt & Analyt, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Klos, B.
    Univ Silesia, August Chelkowski Inst Phys, Uniwersytecka 4, PL-40007 Katowice, Poland.
    Krzemien, W.
    Natl Ctr Nucl Res, High Energy Phys Dept, Ul Hoza 69, PL-00681 Warsaw, Poland.
    Kulessa, P.
    Polish Acad Sci, Henryk Niewodniczanski Inst Nucl Phys, Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31342 Krakow, Poland.
    Kupsc, Andrzej
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics. Natl Ctr Nucl Res, High Energy Phys Dept, Ul Hoza 69, PL-00681 Warsaw, Poland.
    Kuzmin, A.
    SB RAS, Budker Inst Nucl Phys, 11 Akad Lavrentieva Prospect, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia;Novosibirsk State Univ, 2 Pirogova Str, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia.
    Lalwani, K.
    Malaviya Natl Inst Technol Jaipur, Dept Phys, JLN Marg, Jaipur 302017, Rajasthan, India.
    Lersch, D.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Lorentz, B.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Magiera, A.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Maier, R.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich Aachen Res Alliance, JARA FAME, D-52425 Julich, Germany;Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany;Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Marciniewski, Pawel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Marianski, B.
    Natl Ctr Nucl Res, Dept Nucl Phys, Ul Hoza 69, PL-00681 Warsaw, Poland.
    Morsch, H. -P
    Moskal, P.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Ohm, H.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Parol, W.
    Polish Acad Sci, Henryk Niewodniczanski Inst Nucl Phys, Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31342 Krakow, Poland.
    del Rio, E. Perez
    Univ Tubingen, Phys Inst, Kepler Ctr Astro & Teilchenphys, Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany;INFN, Lab Nazl Frascati, Via E Fermi 40, I-00044 Rome, Italy;Eberhard Karls Univ Tubingen, Phys Inst, Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany.
    Piskunovu, N. M.
    Joint Inst Nucl Res, Veksler & Baldin Lab High Energiy Phys, 6 Joliot Curie, Dubna 141980, Russia.
    Prasuhn, D.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Pszczel, Damian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics. Natl Ctr Nucl Res, High Energy Phys Dept, Ul Hoza 69, PL-00681 Warsaw, Poland.
    Pysz, K.
    Polish Acad Sci, Henryk Niewodniczanski Inst Nucl Phys, Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31342 Krakow, Poland.
    Pyszniak, Andzej
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics. Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Ritman, J.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich Aachen Res Alliance, JARA FAME, D-52425 Julich, Germany;Ruhr Univ Bochum, Inst Expt Phys, Univ Str 150, D-44780 Bochum, Germany;Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany;Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Roy, A.
    Indian Inst Technol Indore, Dept Phys, Khandwa Rd, Indore 453552, Madhya Pradesh, India.
    Rudy, Z.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Rundel, O.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Sawant, S.
    Indian Inst Technol, Dept Phys, Bombay 400076, Maharashtra, India.
    Schadmand, S.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Schatti-Ozerianska, I.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Sefzick, T.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Serdyuk, V.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Shwartz, B.
    SB RAS, Budker Inst Nucl Phys, 11 Akad Lavrentieva Prospect, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia;Novosibirsk State Univ, 2 Pirogova Str, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia.
    Sitterberg, K.
    Westfal Wilhelms Univ Munster, Inst Kernphys, Wilhelm Klemm Str 9, D-48149 Munster, Germany.
    Skorodko, T.
    Univ Tubingen, Phys Inst, Kepler Ctr Astro & Teilchenphys, Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany;Tomsk State Univ, Dept Phys, 36 Lenina Ave, Tomsk 634050, Russia;Eberhard Karls Univ Tubingen, Phys Inst, Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany.
    Skurzok, M.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Smyrski, J.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Sopov, V.
    Kurchatov Inst, Natl Res Ctr, Inst Theoret & Expt Phys, 25 Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya, Moscow 117218, Russia.
    Stassen, R.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Stepaniak, J.
    Natl Ctr Nucl Res, High Energy Phys Dept, Ul Hoza 69, PL-00681 Warsaw, Poland.
    Stephan, E.
    Univ Silesia, August Chelkowski Inst Phys, Uniwersytecka 4, PL-40007 Katowice, Poland.
    Sterzenbach, G.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Stockhorst, H.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Stroeher, H.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich Aachen Res Alliance, JARA FAME, D-52425 Julich, Germany;Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany;Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen, Germany.
    Szczurek, A.
    Polish Acad Sci, Henryk Niewodniczanski Inst Nucl Phys, Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31342 Krakow, Poland.
    Trzcinski, A.
    Natl Ctr Nucl Res, Dept Nucl Phys, Ul Hoza 69, PL-00681 Warsaw, Poland.
    Wolke, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Wronska, A.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Wuestner, P.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Zent Inst Engn Elekt & Analyt, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Yamamoto, A.
    High Energy Accelerator Res Org KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050801, Japan.
    Zabierowski, J.
    Natl Ctr Nucl Res, Astrophys Div, Box 447, PL-90950 Lodz, Poland.
    Zielinski, M. J.
    Jagiellonian Univ, Inst Phys, Prof Stanislawa Lojasiewicza 11, PL-30348 Krakow, Poland.
    Zlomanczuk, Jozef
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Zupranski, P.
    Natl Ctr Nucl Res, Dept Nucl Phys, Ul Hoza 69, PL-00681 Warsaw, Poland.
    Zurek, M.
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Inst Kernphys, D-52425 Julich, Germany.
    Wilkin, C.
    UCL, Phys & Astron Dept, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Total and differential cross sections of η-production in proton–deuteron fusion for excess energies between Qη = 13 MeV and Qη = 81 MeV2018In: Physics Letters B, ISSN 0370-2693, E-ISSN 1873-2445, Vol. 782, p. 297-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New data on both total and differential cross sections of the production of eta mesons in proton-deuteron fusion to He-3 eta in the excess energy region 13.6 MeV <= Q(eta) <= 80.9 MeV are presented. These data have been obtained with the WASA-at-COSY detector setup located at the Forschungszentrum Julich, using a proton beam at 15 different beam momenta between p(p) = 1.60 GeV/c and p(p) = 1.74 GeV/c. While significant structure of the total cross section is observed in the energy region 20 MeV less than or similar to Q(eta) less than or similar to 60 MeV, a previously reported sharp variation around Q(eta) approximate to 50 MeV cannot be confirmed. Angular distributions show the typical forward- peaking that was noted earlier. For the first time, it is possible to study the development of these angular distributions with rising excess energy over a wide interval.

  • Rud, Jakob Nymann
    et al.
    Hørmann, Morten
    Hammervold, Vibeke
    Ásmundsson, Ragnar
    Georgiev, Ivo
    Dyer, Gillian
    Andersen, Simon Brøndum
    Jessen, Jes Erik
    Kvorning, Pia
    Brødsted, Meta Reimer
    Energy in the West Nordics and the Artic: Scenario Analysis2018Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This project explores the energy systems and their development towards 2035 in the West Nordic areas and the Arctic. The objective of the project was to contribute to a knowledge base that can be shared and used in developing a sustainable and competitive energy systems that fulfil the goals and obligations for 2035 on climate, emissions and renewable shares. “Energy systems” in this case covers the potential for different renewable energy resources, infrastructure, the demand for energy in different sectors, and relevant policies.Along with the scenario analysis, five case studies have been developed: land transport; a small hybrid energy system in Igaliku, Greenland; electrification of fishing vessels; tourism; and the future energy system in Svalbard.

  • Johnson, Ericka
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Att kissa som en gammal gubbe2018In: Prostatan - det ständiga gisslet: Mannen och prostatan i kultur, medicin och historia / [ed] Maria Björkman, Nordic Academic Press, 2018, p. 13-25Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Många män upplever en förändring i urineringsmönster då de åldras, och många erfar även ett återkommande behov att urinera, samtidigt som de har svårigheter att tömma blåsan. ”Att kissa som en gammal gubbe”, som en man kallade det. Det är en frustrerande situation både för kropp och själ.

    Ett återkommande tema i de intervjuer jag har genomfört för den forskningsstudie som ligger till grund för detta kapitel, är att när prostatan förändras, åldras och kanske blir sjuk innebär detta en ny upplevelse av det offentliga rummet för dessa män. Från att, i de flesta fall, ha levt i en frisk, ung eller medelålders kropp, så har de män jag träffat plötsligt inte längre passat in i den ”normala” kategorin på grund av en problematisk prostata. När denna förändring sker förflyttas kroppen från kategorin ”normal” till kategorin ”icke-normal”. Förvandlingen synliggör samtidigt en infrastruktur av offentliga toaletter som hitintills varit osynlig. Detta kan komma som en chock.

  • Gustavsson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    The non-Abelian tensor multiplet2018In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 7, article id 084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We assume the existence of a background vector field that enables us to make an ansatz for the superconformal transformations for the non-Abelian 6d (1, 0) tensor multiplet. Closure of supersymmetry on generators of the conformal algebra and the R-symmetry, requires that the vector field is Abelian, has scaling dimension minus one and that the supersymmetry parameter as well as all the fields in the tensor multiplet have vanishing Lie derivatives along this vector field. We couple the tensor multiplet to an ad-joint hypermultiplet, and present a Lagrangian for the combined system that has enhanced (2, 0) superconformal symmetry. We also obtain the off-shell supersymmetry variations for both the tensor and the hypermultiplets.

  • The Helsinki Treaty: Treaty of Co-operation between Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Treaty of Co-operation between Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden (the Helsinki Treaty). This Treaty was signed on 23 March 1962 and entered into force on 1 July 1962. The original text has been amended by Agreements that were signed on 13 February 1971, 11 March 1974, 15 June 1983, 6 May 1985, 21 August 1991, 18 March 1993, and 29 September 1995. The most recent amendments entered into force on 2 January 1996.

  • Helsingforsaftalen: Samarbejdsoverenskomst mellem Danmark, Finland, Island, Norge og Sverige2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [da]

    Samarbejdsoverenskomst mellem Danmark, Finland, Island, Norge og Sverige (Helsingforsaftalen). Overenskomsten undertegnedes den 23. marts 1962 og trådte i kraft den 1. juli samme år. Den oprindelige tekst er ændret ved overenskomster, som undertegnedes den 13. februar 1971, den 11. marts 1974, den 15. juni 1983, den 6. maj 1985, den 21. august 1991, den 18. marts 1993 og den 29. september 1995. De seneste ændringer trådte i kraft den 2. januar 1996.

  • Helsingforsavtalen: Samarbeidsavtale mellom Danmark, Finland, Island, Norge og Sverige2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [no]

    Samarbeidsavtale mellom Danmark, Finland, Island, Norge og Sverige (Helsingforsavtalen). Avtalen ble undertegnet den 23. mars 1962 og trådte i kraft den 1. juli samme år. Den opprinnelige tekst er revidert ved avtaler som ble undertegnet den 13. februar 1971, den 11. mars 1974, den 15. juni 1983, den 6. mai 1985, den 21. august 1991, den 18. mars 1993 og den 29. september 1995. Den sistnevnte endringsavtale trådte i kraft den 2. januar 1996.

  • Helsingforssamningurinn: Samstarfssamningur milli Danmerkur, Finnlands, Íslands, Noregs og Svíþjóðar.2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [is]

    Samstarfssamningur milli Danmerkur, Finnlands, Íslands, Noregs og Svíþjóðar (Helsingforssamningurinn). Samningurinn var undirritaður 23. mars 1962 og öðlaðist gildi 1. júlí sama ár. Hinn upprunalegi texti hefur verið endurskoðaður í samræmi við samninga er undirritaðir voru 13. febrúar 1971, 11. mars 1974, 15. júní 1983, 6. maí 1985, 21. ágúst 1991, 18. mars 1993 og 29. september 1995. Síðustu breytingar gengu í gildi 2. janúar 1996.

  • Rogne, Adrian F.
    et al.
    University of Oslo.
    Andersson, Eva K
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Lyngstad, Torkild H.
    University of Oslo.
    Neighbourhood Concentration and Representation of Non-European migrants: New results from Norway2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a previous study, Andersson et al. (2018) compared the patterns of residential segregation between non-European immigrants and the rest of the population in four European countries, using the k-nearest neighbours approach to compute comparable measures of segregation. This approach relies on detailed geo-coded data and can be used to assess segregation levels at different neighbourhood scales. This paper updates these findings with results from Norway. Using similar data and methods, we document both similarities and striking differences between the segregation patterns in Norway and Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden. While the segregation patterns in Norway at larger scales are roughly comparable to those found in Denmark, but with higher concentrations of non-European immigrants in the most immigrant- dense large-scale neighbourhoods, the micro-level segregation is much lower in Norway than in the other countries. While an important finding by Andersson et al. (2018) was that segregation levels at the micro scale of 200 nearest neighbours fell within a narrow band, with a dissimilarity index between 0.475 and 0.512 in the four countries under study, segregation levels at this scale are clearly lower in Norway, with a dissimilarity index of 0.429. We speculate that this may in part be driven by Norwegian settlement policies for refugees and asylum seekers, but other explanations are possible.

  • Ashcroft, Linden
    et al.
    Coll, Joan Ramon
    Gilabert, Alba
    Domonkos, Peter
    Brunet, Manola
    Aguilar, Enric
    Castella, Merce
    Sigro, Javier
    Harris, Ian
    Undén, Per
    SMHI, Research Department, Meteorology.
    Jones, Phil
    A rescued dataset of sub-daily meteorological observations for Europe and the southern Mediterranean region, 1877-20122018In: Earth System Science Data, ISSN 1866-3508, E-ISSN 1866-3516, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 1613-1635Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Helsingin sopimus: Yhteistyösopimus Islannin, Norjan, Ruotsin, Suomen ja Tanskan välillä2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [fi]

    Yhteistyösopimus Islannin, Norjan, Ruotsin, Suomen ja Tanskan välillä (Helsingin sopimus). Sopimus allekirjoitettiin maaliskuun 23. päivänä 1962 ja tuli voimaan 1. päivänä heinäkuuta samana vuonna. Alkuperäistä tekstiä on muutettu sopimuksilla, jotka on allekirjoitettu helmikuun 13. päivänä 1971, maaliskuun 11. päivänä 1974, kesäkuun 15. päivänä 1983, toukokuun 6. päivänä 1985, elokuun 21. päivänä 1991, maaliskuun 18. päivänä 1993 ja syyskuun 29. päivänä 1995. Viimeisimmät muutokset astuivat voimaan tammikuun 2. päivänä 1996.

  • Public defence: 2018-10-19 10:00 Kollegiesalen, Stockholm
    Barkar, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering. KTH.
    Modelling phase separation in Fe-Cr alloys: A continuum approach2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of Cr-rich and Fe-rich domains upon ageing of an initially homogeneous Fe-Cr alloy at elevated temperatures (300-600 ºC) is commonly referred to as phase separation. The behaviour originates from a miscibility gap in the Fe-Cr phase diagram. The boundary of the miscibility gap is denoted the binodal, and the line where the second derivative of the molar Gibbs energy w.r.t. composition is zero, the spinodal. In the region between the binodal and spinodal lines, the phase separation is said to occur by means of nucleation and growth. Inside the spinodal line, no thermally activated nucleation event is needed, and the initially homogeneous alloy decomposes "spinodally" into Cr-rich and Fe-rich regions. This type of phase transformation can be viewed as a continuous build up of Cr-rich regions, that also are interconnected, forming a microstructure characteristic for alloys decomposed spinodally. Phase separation has been of great interest within the metallurgical community as well as industry, due to its embritteling effect. Phase separation in Cr-rich ferritic steels, and thus embrittlement, sets a practical upper service temperature of ~300 ºC for Cr-containing ferrites. It is desirable to develop understanding and modelling capability for decomposing alloy systems, since such knowledge could be used to relieve the limitation in service temperature. The current work has been focused around the development and use of computer simulations, using thermodynamic and kinetic input from databases, in order to progress towards alloy design where decomposition is minimized. Simulations in this work are based on solving the so called Cahn-Hilliard equation, where an important parameter is the gradient energy, since it influences both the morphology and rate of decomposition in the simulations. An attempt at formulating a general model for the gradient energy coefficients in multi-component systems has been made, but has yet to be properly tried against experimental data. Improvements, and insights, to the initial state used in simulations has also been achieved. The combination of above mentioned efforts is a step towards a predictive tool for decomposition of complex alloys. Such a tool could not only be an aid in future alloy design, but also be used as an aid as a diagnosis tool in life time assessment of critical components already in use and thereby difficult to assess on site by means of in-destructive testing, typically components in nuclear power facilities.

  • Wadsten, C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Umea, Sweden;Sundsvall Hosp, Dept Surg, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Wennstig, A.-K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Garmo, H.
    Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Sect Canc Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, London, England;Uppsala Univ, Reg Canc Ctr, Uppsala Univ Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Greger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Visby Hosp, Dept Oncol, Visby, Sweden;Gavle Cent Hosp, Dept Oncol, Gavle, Sweden.
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Helsinki, Finland;Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Orebro, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Kings Coll London, Fac Life Sci & Med, Sect Canc Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, London, England.
    Fredriksson, Irma
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Breast & Endocrine Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wärnberg, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Sund, M.
    Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Risk of ischemic heart disease after radiotherapy for ductal carcinoma in situ2018In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 171, no 1, p. 95-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in the management of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is increasing. Left-sided breast irradiation may involve exposure of the heart to ionising radiation, increasing the risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD). We examined the incidence of IHD in a population-based cohort of women with DCIS. The Breast Cancer DataBase Sweden (BCBase) cohort includes women registered with invasive and in situ breast cancers 1992-2012 and age-matched women without a history of breast cancer. In this analysis, 6270 women with DCIS and a comparison cohort of 31,257 women were included. Through linkage with population-based registers, data on comorbidity, socioeconomic status and incidence of IHD was obtained. Hazard ratios (HR) for IHD with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were analysed. Median follow-up time was 8.8 years. The risk of IHD was not increased for women with DCIS versus women in the comparison cohort (HR 0.93; 95% CI 0.82-1.06), after treatment with radiotherapy versus surgery alone (HR 0.77; 95% CI 0.60-0.98) or when analysing RT by laterality (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.53-1.37 for left-sided versus right-sided RT). The risk of IHD was lower for women with DCIS allocated to RT compared to non-irradiated women and to the comparison cohort, probably due to patient selection. Comparison of RT by laterality did not show any over-risk for irradiation of the left breast.

  • Jones, Julia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Univ Sussex, Sch Life Sci, Brighton BN1 9QG, E Sussex, England.
    Fruciano, C.
    PSL Univ Paris, CNRS, INSERM, IBENS,Ecole Normale Super, F-75005 Paris, France;Queensland Univ Technol, Sch Earth Environm & Biol Sci, Brisbane, Qld 4000, Australia.
    Marchant, J.
    Univ Sussex, Sch Life Sci, Brighton BN1 9QG, E Sussex, England.
    Hildebrand, F.
    European Mol Biol Lab, Struct & Computat Biol Unit, D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Forslund, S.
    European Mol Biol Lab, Struct & Computat Biol Unit, D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Bork, P.
    Univ Wurzburg, Dept Bioinformat, D-97074 Wurzburg, Germany;Max Delbruck Ctr Mol Med, D-13125 Berlin, Germany;European Mol Biol Lab, Struct & Computat Biol Unit, D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Engel, P.
    Univ Lausanne, Dept Fundamental Microbiol, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Hughes, W. O. H.
    Univ Sussex, Sch Life Sci, Brighton BN1 9QG, E Sussex, England.
    The gut microbiome is associated with behavioural task in honey bees2018In: Insectes Sociaux, ISSN 0020-1812, E-ISSN 1420-9098, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 419-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The gut microbiome is recognised as playing an integral role in the health and ecology of a wide variety of animal taxa. However, the relationship between social behavioural traits and the microbial community has received little attention. Honey bees are highly social and the workers perform different behavioural tasks in the colony that cause them to be exposed to different local environments. Here we examined whether the gut microbial community composition of worker honey bees is associated with the behavioural tasks they perform, and therefore also the local environment they are exposed to. We set up five observation hives, in which all workers were matched in age and observed the behaviour of marked bees in each colony over 4 days. The gut bacterial communities of bees seen performing predominantly foraging or predominantly in nest tasks were then characterised and compared based on amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Our results show that some core members of the unique honey bee gut bacterial community are represented in different relative abundances in bees performing different behavioural tasks. The differentially represented bacterial taxa include some thought to be important in carbohydrate metabolism and transport, and also linked to bee health. The results suggest an influence of task-related local environment exposure and diet on the honey bee gut microbial community and identify focal core taxa for further functional analyses.

  • Public defence: 2018-10-23 17:13 F3, Stockholm
    Malm, Arvid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    The Absent Entrepreneur: Exploring the Role of the Entrepreneur in Economics2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Economics as an academic discipline has often found it difficult to formally model the Entrepreneur. As Baumol (1968) noted, “The theoretical firm is entrepreneurless—the prince of Denmark has been expunged from the discussion of Hamlet.”This dissertation first examines if the entrepreneur is still absent from economics and then seeks to apply the concept of the entrepreneur to some contemporary economic discussions. Finally, I examine a concept closely associated with entrepreneurship: Philanthropy.The first and second article examine the presence of the entrepreneur and the family firm in the current economic “canon” in economics PhD programs. We find that the entrepreneur remains scarce in economics, but that some recent included works attempt to model entrepreneurship. The family firm is entirely absent from the surveyed literature.The third article examines the impact of a major Swedish educational reform that lengthened mandatory education on self-employment outcomes. I find that reform participants are less likely to operate marginal businesses.The fourth article examines income inequality in the United States in relation to entrepreneurship. Using the “Supermanager” hypothesis of Thomas Piketty as a starting point, we argue that entrepreneurs and managers in closely held firms play an important role in rising income inequality.Finally, the fifth article examines the state of Swedish philanthropy, a field usually fueled by successful entrepreneurship. We examine the productivity of philanthropic funding of research relative to other R&D funding and conclude that the main predictor of publication and patent output appears to be overall funding, not funding structure.

  • Langer, Sarka
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Österman, Cecilia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Kalmar Maritime Academy.
    Strandberg, Bo
    Lund University.
    Fridén, Håkan
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Riskbedömning av svenska sjömäns yrkesmässiga exponering för toxiska luftföroreningar: Mätningar och enkätundersökning2018Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett fartyg utgör både en arbetsmiljö och en boendemiljö och besättningen vistas ofta långa tider ombord. Ombordtjänstgöringen kan vara i veckor eller månader och kan ibland passera flera klimat­zoner. Eftersom vi tillbringar den största delen av vår tid inomhus är det där vi främst exponeras. På ett fartyg kan det vara svårt att påverka sin exponering för kemiska ämnen eftersom möjligheten att byta miljö är liten. Det är därför extra viktigt att innemiljön är god.

    Luften ombord präglas till stor del av de kemiska ämnen som har sitt ursprung i fartygets bränsle, smörjoljor och motoravgaser. Det är en komplicerad blandning som innehåller mest koldioxid, kol­monoxid, svaveldioxid, kväveoxider men också kolväten såsom bensen, toluen, xylener, och poly­cykliska aromatiska kolväten. Flera av dessa ämnen är cancerframkallande eller hälsoskadliga på annat sätt. Det finns dock få vetenskapliga studier som undersökt den personliga exponeringen för farliga luftföroreningar som de sjömän som arbetar ombord utsätts för.

    Syftet med projektet som presenteras i denna rapport var att kartlägga den personliga exponeringen för de toxiska luftföroreningarna bensen, kvävedioxid (NO2) och polycykliska aromatiska kolväten (PAH) som alla kan spåras till fartygs-bränslet och bränsleavgaser. Den uppmätta exponeringen har analyserats för att kunna identifiera eventuella skillnader mellan typ av fartyg och mellan olika avdelningar och befattningar ombord. De uppmätta halterna har jämförts med svenska lagkrav men också med internationella, icke bindande riktlinjer för innemiljöer, för att få en uppfattning om halternas storlek. Dessutom har vi undersökt hur besättningen själva upplever sin luftkvalitet ombord. Projektets övergripande mål var att utveckla en metod för riskbedömning av exponeringen som kan användas av branschen, samt att formulera praktiska råd och rekommendationer.

    Den personliga exponeringen har mätts med passiva diffusionsprovtagare som burits i andnings­zonen av personer som arbetar ombord. Totalt har vi resultat från 124 personer på 11 olika fartyg med olika typ av framdrivningsmaskineri och som går på olika bränslen. En enkät med frågor om upplevd luftkvalitet på arbetsplatsen och i hytten har delats ut till alla personer i besättningen på de besökta fartygen. Enkäten har besvarats av totalt 308 personer viket motsvarar en svarsfrekvens på 78%.

    Resultaten visar att samtliga uppmätta personliga exponeringar låg långt under Arbetsmiljöverkets hygieniska gränsvärden som också gäller svenskflaggade fartyg genom Transportstyrelsens föreskrifter. En del personer har exponerats för halter i nivå med och i vissa fall något över Världshälsoorganisationens hälsobaserade rekommenderade riktvärden för innemiljöer. Dessa riktvärden är dock satta för innemiljöer utan industriell verksamhet och med tanke på att barn, sjuka och äldre kan vistas i sådana innemiljöer under en längre tid. Även om fartyget utgör en boendemiljö för de som arbetar ombord, så kan besättningen förväntas ut­göras av friska personer i arbetsför ålder. Däremot pekar resultatet på vikten av att arbeta system­atiskt med att minimera exponeringen för farliga luftföroreningar så långt som det är möjligt. Världshälsoorganisationen menar att det inte finns säkra halter av bensen och benso(a)pyren. Därför kan de arbetsuppgifter som innebär en något högre exponering för dessa farliga ämnen behöva riskbedömas särskilt, till exempel sådana som innebär kontakt med bränslen, smörjoljor, hydrauloljor eller andra kemikalier, eller exponering för fordonsavgaser eller stekos.

    En jämförelse av hela besättningens exponering på de olika fartygen visade att det fanns skillnader både mellan fartyg och inom fartyg. Här har multivariata analyser av resultaten gett en sammansatt bild av exponeringen och bekräftar individuella ämnen. Fartygets funktion och bränsle är indikativa determinanter för exponeringens storlek. Fartyg som fraktar marint bränsle och de som drivs på tjockolja uppvisar högre exponeringsgrad än andra typer av fartyg.

    Vid en jämförelse mellan befattning och avdelning ser vi att maskinmanskap generellt har högst upp­mätta halter, följt av personal inom däcksavdelningen och intendenturen som har lägst halter. Vid en jämförelse av resultaten för befäl och manskap på alla fartyg ser vi ingen skillnad i exponering.

    Resultaten av enkätundersökningen visar att luftkvaliteten i stort upplevs som acceptabel. När vi bryter ner resultaten per avdelning ser vi att driftpersonalen, däck- och maskinavdelningarna, är mer nöjda med sin luftkvalitet än intendenturen. Skillnaden mellan avdelningarna syns också när det gäller luktens intensitet, där däck- och maskinavdelningarna upplever liten till måttlig lukt på sin arbetsplats och i sin hytt och intendenturpersonalen upplever en starkare lukt på sin arbetsplats, från måttlig till stark lukt.

    Exponering för mer än ett ämne med liknande effekt innebär en så kallad additiv, hygienisk effekt. Ett kumulativt riskindex har därför tagits fram utifrån summan av kvoterna mellan uppmätt halt för ämnena NO2, bensen, benso(a)pyren och naftalen och deras respektive hälsobaserade riktvärde fram­taget av Världshälsoorganisationen. Detta riskindex har använts för att jämföra exponeringen med normalbefolkningen i Sverige, samt för att identifiera skillnader mellan fartyg, befattningar och avdelningar. Kumulativt riskindex kan användas för riskbedömningar av arbeten och arbetsuppgifter med syfte att eliminera och minimera kända exponeringar så långt som möjligt.

    Åtgärder för att minska den personliga exponeringen kan vara både tekniska och organisatoriska. Det är viktigt att säkerställa en god allmänventilation för såväl arbetsplatser som hytter. Vissa utrymmen kan behöva särskilda utsug, såsom arbetsplatser för svetsning och maskinbearbetning, rengöring av motordelar, blandning av färg, över stekbord i köket och liknande, för att fånga upp luftföroreningar nära källan. Alternativt kan befintliga utsug behöva förbättras. Det är också viktigt att ha bra rutiner för rengöring och underhåll av arbetsutrustning och ventilationsanläggningar. Organisatoriska åtgärder kan vara att planera och fördela arbetet för att minska exponeringen för den enskilde individen genom arbetsrotation, arbetsväxling och möjligheter till paus i utrymme med lägre exponering.

    De skillnader i upplevelsen av luftens kvalitet som ses mellan avdelningarna kan dels förklaras av olika typer av arbetsuppgifter och exponeringar som personalen inom de respektive avdelningarna har men upplevelsen styrs också av psykosociala arbetsmiljöfaktorer som hög arbetsbelastning, höga krav i arbetet och liten möjlighet att själv kunna påverka sin arbetssituation, samt lågt socialt stöd och låg arbetstillfredsställelse. Här kan helt andra typer av arbetsmiljöåtgärder behöva diskuteras för att öka upplevelsen av inflytande, delaktighet och stöd i arbetet.

  • Gustavsson, Jakob
    et al.
    Executive, Universitet, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Henrik
    Executive, Universitet, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Ahrens, Lutz
    Executive, Universitet, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Wiberg, Karin
    Executive, Universitet, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Screening of replacement substances for the brominated flame retardants PBDE, HBCDD and TBBPA2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify aquatic point sources of flame retardants (FRs) to the Swedish environment. This was done by measuring FR levels in different types of water flows and by estimating daily fluxes of FRs using water flow data. The sampled sites included wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs, n = 5), waste treatment facilities (WTFs, n = 4), airports (n = 5), industries (n = 2), storm water from urban/industrial areas (n = 6), and agriculture (n = 2). Water (n = 42) and particulate (n = 42) samples were collected during February-April 2018 and analyzed for in total 62 target FRs from three different classes: halogenated FRs (HFRs), organophosphorus FRs (OPFRs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs).

    In total, 34 different FRs were detected in at least one sample. The highest number of FRs were detected in a sample from a WTF (Högbytorp, n = 23), followed by Skavsta airport (n = 17), Ärna airport (n = 16), and Ryaverket WWTP (n = 16). The highest average number of detected FRs (± standard deviation) were found for WTFs (n = 15 ± 5), followed by WWTPs (n = 13 ± 3), storm water (n = 11 ± 2), airport (n = 9 ± 6), and industry (n = 5 ± 1). The most frequently detected FR was TDCIPP (78% of all samples), followed by BDE66 (68%), TEHP (57%), TCIPP (57%), and TBOEP (57%).

    Total bulk FR concentrations ranged between <MQL to 130 000 ng L-1. The highest total bulk concentrations were found in the samples from Skavsta airport (130 000 ng L-1), Vivsta …. (11 000 ng L-1), Högbytorp WTF (6 900 ng L-1) and Henriksdal WWTP (4 300-6 600ng L-1). In general, OPFRs contributed the most to the total concentrations with on average 76% of the total bulk concentration followed by HFRs (7%), and PBDEs (6%).

    FR fluxes ranged between <MQL and 1.8 kg day-1. Four sites showed considerably higher total fluxes than the other sites. Out of those, three sites were WWTPs (Henriksdal: 1.2-1.8 kg day-1; Ryaverket: 0.67 kg day-1; Skebäcksverket: 0.18 kg day-1), indicating WWTPs as important pathways of FRs to the Swedish environment. Considering the screening design of this study, all reported concentrations and fluxes should be interpreted with care.

  • Wallin, Sigurd
    The Nordic Museum.
    Skogaholmsträdgården på Skansen1944In: Fataburen - Nordiska Museet och Skansens Årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1944, p. 185-190Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Lagerquist, Marshall
    The Nordic Museum.
    Alrotsmöbler i den Clarholmska gåvan1944In: Fataburen - Nordiska Museet och Skansens Årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1944, p. 181-184Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Baeckström, Arvid
    The Nordic Museum.
    Keramiken i den Clarholmska gåvan1944In: Fataburen - Nordiska Museet och Skansens Årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1944, p. 169-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Andersson, Torsten
    The Nordic Museum.
    Silver från Vä och Kristianstad1944In: Fataburen - Nordiska Museet och Skansens Årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1944, p. 153-168Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Public defence: 2018-10-15 15:00 F3, Stockholm
    Välja, Margus
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Network and Systems engineering.
    Improving IT Architecture Modeling Through Automation: Cyber Security Analysis of Smart Grids2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary organizations depend on IT to reach their goals but the organizations are constantly adapting to changing market conditions and these changes need to be reflected in the IT architecture. Modeling is often used to manage complex architectures allowing to abstract details and focus on the most important aspects. Metamodels are central to modeling and used as a mechanism for modeling different phenomena and describing evolving designs such as IT architectures. However, it can be difficult to model IT architecture especially in large organizations due to the amount and diversity of systems, software, data, et cetera. Previous studies have found problems with metamodels and the support modeling tools provide to the users. The topics mentioned by numerous authors are lacking cyber security analysis capabilities and the support for automated model creation using enterprise data. These two topics are studied in this thesis with the focus on smart grids. 

    The contribution of this thesis is to offer support for IT architecture modeling processes with the following propositions that are described in four papers. The contribution includes a metamodel extension for analyzing insider threats and reachability (Paper A), a framework for automatic modeling (Paper B), a framework for improving semantic accuracy and granularity matching in automatic modeling (Paper C) and a reference model for cyber security analysis of smart grid load balancing (Paper D).

  • NN, nn
    The Nordic Museum.
    Läkaren, Barnets värld, Lin och linne - tre tillfälliga utställningar på Nordiska Museet 19451944In: Fataburen - Nordiska Museet och Skansens Årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1944, p. 147-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Boëthius, Gerda
    The Nordic Museum.
    Ottilia Adelborgs upptäcktsfärder med pennstift och dagbok1944In: Fataburen - Nordiska Museet och Skansens Årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1944, p. 131-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Svensson, Sigfrid
    The Nordic Museum.
    Säbykistan1944In: Fataburen - Nordiska Museet och Skansens Årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1944, p. 121-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Jönsson, Malin
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science.
    Lindvall, Lina
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science.
    Clausson, Eva
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Research Environment Children's and Young People's Health in Social Context (CYPHiSCO). Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Health Science, Avdelningen för sjuksköterskeutbildningarna och integrerad hälsovetenskap.
    Skolsköterskors dokumentation i skolhälsovårdsjournalen: en tioårsuppföljning2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • Andrén, Erik
    The Nordic Museum.
    Vauxhallen - Novilla1944In: Fataburen - Nordiska Museet och Skansens Årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1944, p. 105-120Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Nilsson, Albert
    The Nordic Museum.
    Mårdstocken och dess gillring1944In: Fataburen - Nordiska Museet och Skansens Årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1944, p. 97-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Kleberg, Lars
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Sverige.
    Semenenko, AlekseiStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Slavic Languages.
    SERGEJ PETROV: Poet och översättare2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • Hammarskiöld, Ludvig
    The Nordic Museum.
    När man gjorde kanoner och krut vid Tyresö1944In: Fataburen - Nordiska Museet och Skansens Årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1944, p. 85-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Treverton, Greg
    Swedish Defence University, Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership (ISSL), Centre for Societal Security, CATS (Center for Asymmetric Threat Studies).
    The Intelligence Challenges of Hybrid ThreatsFocus on Cyber and Virtual Realm: Focus on Cyber and Virtual Realm2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What challenges does “Hybrid Threats” pose for the world of intelligence analysisand tradecraft, and how should intelligence agencies adapt? This study is a part ofCATS’ project on intelligence connected to Influence Operations, and is sponsoredby the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency (MSB). It addresses the new realm ofhybrid threats and challenges, and the roles for the world of intelligence analysisand tradecraft.

    In this this study, Dr Gregory Treverton – former Chairman of the US NationalIntelligence Council and now Senior Fellow with CATS – analyzes social media andcyber attacks as well as signals and human intelligence in relation to real world events.

    The intelligence challenge starts with recognizing the range of hybrid threatsand what is new about them –targets are now societies, not armies; several toolsare being used both simultaneously and strategically for maximum effect; and itexplores how the cyber dimension, along with the social media (SM) and othervirtual arenas offer new, inexpensive avenues of attack. This important analyticalcontribution begins with the tools, then turns to the challenges of hybrid threatsacross the elements of intelligence – collection, analysis and relations betweenintelligence and policy.

    Then, it turns to the special challenges for intelligence agencies – but alsothe special opportunities – that exist across a range of cyber and virtual domains.In particularit focuses on the implications for the intelligence organizationsperforming the traditional ‘INT’ functions (HUMINT and SIGINT) and forcounterintelligence.It concludes with perspectives on how the special challenges ofhybrid threats might conduce to a much wider change in the traditional intelligenceparadigm.

  • Rehnberg, Mats
    The Nordic Museum.
    Gratulationer och minnestavlor1944In: Fataburen - Nordiska Museet och Skansens Årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1944, p. 61-84Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Mannerfelt, Måns
    The Nordic Museum.
    Min ungdoms landsväg: Minnen från Västergötland1944In: Fataburen - Nordiska Museet och Skansens Årsbok, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 1944, p. 49-60Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Dyrvold, Anneli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Conceptualising Translations Between Representations2018In: Proceedings of the 42nd Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 2). / [ed] Bergqvist, E., Österholm, M, Granberg, C., & Sumpter, L., Umeå, Sweden: PME , 2018, Vol. 2, p. 379-386Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Representations and translations between them are central in mathematics education. For example, in the NCTM standards it is emphasized students need to be able to “select, apply, and translate among mathematical representations to solve problems” (NCTM 2000, p.67). A variety of research studies have contributed to the knowledge about translations the last decades. This variety is both an asset and an obstacle when this research is used to implement new strategies in the school practice or as a base to plan new research studies. To enable an accumulation of the emerging knowledge there is a need to categorize studies that focus on similar questions and that conceptualizes translation similarly. The current paper suggests some classifications that such a categorization can be based on in an emerging framework. 

  • Cotter, Chris
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. Univ Calif San Francisco, Global Hlth Grp, Malaria Eliminat Initiat, 550 16th St,3rd Floor, San Francisco, CA 94158 USA.
    Sudathip, Prayuth
    Minist Publ Hlth, Dept Dis Control, Bur Vector Borne Dis, Nonthaburi, Thailand.
    Herdiana, Herdiana
    UN Childrens Fund UNICEF, Aceh Field Off, Banda Aceh, Indonesia;Paritrana Asia Fdn, Jakarta, Indonesia.
    Cao, Yuanyuan
    Jiangsu Inst Parasit Dis, Jiangsu Prov Key Lab Parasite & Vector Control Te, Key Lab, Natl Hlth & Family Planning Commiss Parasit Dis C, Wuxi, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Yaobao
    Jiangsu Inst Parasit Dis, Jiangsu Prov Key Lab Parasite & Vector Control Te, Key Lab, Natl Hlth & Family Planning Commiss Parasit Dis C, Wuxi, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.
    Luo, Alex
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Global Hlth Sci, San Francisco, CA 94158 USA.
    Ranasinghe, Neil
    Thomson Reuters Ltd, London, England.
    Bennett, Adam
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Global Hlth Grp, Malaria Eliminat Initiat, 550 16th St,3rd Floor, San Francisco, CA 94158 USA;Univ Calif San Francisco, Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, San Francisco, CA 94158 USA.
    Cao, Jun
    Jiangsu Inst Parasit Dis, Jiangsu Prov Key Lab Parasite & Vector Control Te, Key Lab, Natl Hlth & Family Planning Commiss Parasit Dis C, Wuxi, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.
    Gosling, Roly D.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Global Hlth Grp, Malaria Eliminat Initiat, 550 16th St,3rd Floor, San Francisco, CA 94158 USA;Univ Calif San Francisco, Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, San Francisco, CA 94158 USA.
    Piloting a programme tool to evaluate malaria case investigation and reactive case detection activities: results from 3 settings in the Asia Pacific2017In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 16, article id 347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Case investigation and reactive case detection (RACD) activities are widely-used in low transmission settings to determine the suspected origin of infection and identify and treat malaria infections nearby to the index patient household. Case investigation and RACD activities are time and resource intensive, include methodologies that vary across eliminating settings, and have no standardized metrics or tools available to monitor and evaluate them. Methods: In response to this gap, a simple programme tool was developed for monitoring and evaluating (M&E) RACD activities and piloted by national malaria programmes. During the development phase, four modules of the RACD M&E tool were created to assess and evaluate key case investigation and RACD activities and costs. A pilot phase was then carried out by programme implementers between 2013 and 2015, during which malaria surveillance teams in three different settings (China, Indonesia, Thailand) piloted the tool over a period of 3 months each. This study describes summary results of the pilots and feasibility and impact of the tool on programmes. Results: All three study areas implemented the RACD M&E tool modules, and pilot users reported the tool and evaluation process were helpful to identify gaps in RACD programme activities. In the 45 health facilities evaluated, 71.8% (97/135; min 35.3-max 100.0%) of the proper notification and reporting forms and 20.0% (27/135; min 0.0-max 100.0%) of standard operating procedures (SOPs) were available to support malaria elimination activities. The tool highlighted gaps in reporting key data indicators on the completeness for malaria case reporting (98.8%; min 93.3-max 100.0%), case investigations (65.6%; min 61.8-max 78.4%) and RACD activities (70.0%; min 64.7-max 100.0%). Evaluation of the SOPs showed that knowledge and practices of malaria personnel varied within and between study areas. Average monthly costs for conducting case investigation and RACD activities showed variation between study areas (min USD $844.80-max USD $2038.00) for the malaria personnel, commodities, services and other costs required to carry out the activities. Conclusion: The RACD M&E tool was implemented in the three pilot areas, identifying key gaps that led to impacts on programme decision making. Study findings support the need for routine M&E of malaria case reporting, case investigation and RACD activities. Scale-up of the RACD M&E tool in malaria-eliminating settings will contribute to improved programme performance to the high level that is required to reach elimination.

  • Bender, Anke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Sundberg, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Effects of Wave Energy Generators on Nephrops norvegicus2018In: AWTEC 2018 Proceedings, 2018, article id 283Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wave energy research is primarily focused on the technical developments of energy conversion but the parallel evaluation of environmental effects related to wave energy is also essential and reflects sustainable development of renewable energy. At the west coast of Sweden, 120 km north of Gothenburg, the Wave Energy Park “Sotenäs Project” is located. This area has been the location of environmental impact studies from wave energy generators on the macro crustacean species Nephrops norvegicus (Linnaeus, 1758), the Norway lobster. The Norway lobster is an ecologically as well as economically important species in Sweden and across Europe. The aim of this preliminary study was to detect possible positive or negative effects on numbers of individuals by the presence of the wave energy generators and the created “no take” zone. For that purpose, ROV aided seabed recordings of the characteristic Norway lobster burrow entrances were conducted inside the Wave Energy Park and respective control areas in 2016 and 2017. Preliminary results do not show a clear distinct result between the different transects and years. Long-term observations and complementary studies are necessary to draw conclusions and outweigh extreme and rare events of annual one-time samplings.

  • Ros, Alberto
    et al.
    University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain.
    Kaxiras, Stefanos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Computer Systems. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computer Systems.
    The Superfluous Load Queue2018In: Proceedings of the 51st Annual IEEE/ACM International Symposium on Microarchitecture, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an out-of-order core, the load queue (LQ), the store queue (SQ), and the store buffer (SB) are responsible for ensuring: i) correct forwarding of stores to loads and ii) correct ordering among loads (with respect to external stores). The first requirement safeguards the sequential semantics of program execution and applies to both serial and parallel code; the second requirement safeguards the semantics of coherence and consistency (e.g., TSO). In particular, loads search the SQ/SB for the latest value that may have been produced by a store, and stores and invalidations search the LQ to find speculative loads in case they violate uniprocessor or multiprocessor ordering. To meet timing constraints the LQ and SQ/SB system is composed of CAM structures that are frequently searched. This results in high complexity, cost, and significant difficulty to scale, but is the current state of the art.

    Prior research demonstrated the feasibility of a non-associativeLQ by replaying loads at commit. There is a steep cost however: a significant increase in L1 accesses and contention for L1 ports. This is because prior work assumes Sequential Consistency and completely ignores the existence of a SB in the system.

    In contrast, we intentionally delay stores in the SB to achieve a total management of stores and loads in a core, while still supporting TSO. Our main result is that we eliminate the LQwithout burdening the L1 with extra accesses. Store forwarding is achieved by delaying our own stores until speculatively issued loads are validated on commit, entirely in-core; TSO load→load ordering is preserved by delaying remote external stores in their SB until our own speculative reordered loads commit. While the latter is inspired by recent work on non-speculative load reordering, our contribution here is to show that this can be accomplished without having a load queue. Eliminating the LQ results in both energy savings and performance improvement from the elimination of LQ-induced stalls.