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  • Nordic Programme for Co-operation on Energy Policy 2018–20202017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The Nordic energy ministers present a new Nordic energy policy co-operation programme for the period 2018–2021.

    The vision for Nordic energy co-operation is to develop Nordic energy systems through strong, trust-based, adaptable co-operation in order to secure the world’s most integrated and intelligent low-emission green economy, characterised by security of supply and a high level of competitiveness.

    Nordic energy co-operation in the period 2018–2021 will specifically address the following areas:

    • Further development of the Nordic electricity market

    • Renewable energy

    • Energy efficiency

    • Exchange of information and dialogue on the Nordic countries’ energy policies and strategies

    • Energy research and innovation, via Nordic Energy Research

    • The Nordic Region in Europe, including implementation of the EU Energy Union

    • Neighbouring countries, particularly the Baltic states

    • Energy-related transport issues

    • The energy sector in the Faroe Islands, Greenland and Åland

    • Other horizontal programmes and projects, as well as international co-operation.

  • Norræn samstarfsáætlun á sviði orkumála 2018–20212017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [is]

    Norrænu orkumálaráðherrarnir kynna hér með nýja norræna samstarfsáætlun á sviði orkumála fyrir tímabilið 2018–2021.

    Framtíðarsýnin fyrir norrænt orkumálasamstarf felur í sér öflugt, aðlögunarhæft samstarf sem byggir á trausti og og er til þess fallið að þróa norræn orkukerfi í þá átt að tryggja samþættasta og snjallasta græna hagkerfi heims með lágri kolefnislosun, mikilli samkeppnishæfni og afhendingaröryggi.

    Á tímabilinu 2018–2021 verða eftirtalin svið í brennidepli í samstarfinu:

    • Framþróun hins norræna raforkumarkaðar

    • Endurnýjanlegir orkugjafar

    • Aukin orkunýtni

    • Upplýsingaskipti og samráð um stefnu norrænu landanna í orkumálum

    • Orkurannsóknir og nýsköpun á vettvangi Norrænna orkurannsókna• Norðurlönd í Evrópu, þ.m.t. framkvæmd Orkubandalags ESB

    • Grannsvæði Norðurlanda, einkum Eystrasaltsríkin

    • Orkutengd samgöngusjónarmið• Orkugeirinn á Álandseyjum, í Færeyjum og á Grænlandi

    • Aðrar þverlægar áætlanir og verkefni og alþjóðlegt samstarf

  • Det nordiske energipolitiske samarbeidsprogrammet 2018–20212017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [no]

    De nordiske energiministrene presenterer herved et nytt nordisk energipolitisk samarbeidsprogram for perioden 2018–2021.

    Visjonen for det nordiske energisamarbeidet er å utvikle de nordiske energisystemene gjennom et sterkt, tillitsbasert og tilpasningsdyktig samarbeid på en måte som sikrer verdens mest integrerte og intelligente grønne lavutslippsøkonomi med høy konkurranseevne og forsyningssikkerhet.

    Det nordiske energisamarbeidet vil i perioden 2018–2021 særlig handle om disse områdene:

    • Videreutvikling av det nordiske kraftmarkedet

    • Fornybar energi

    • Energieffektivisering

    • Informasjonsutveksling og dialog om de enkelte nordiske landenes energipolitikk og strategier

    • Energiforskning og innovasjon gjennom Nordisk Energiforskning

    • Norden i Europa, herunder gjennomføring av EUs energiunion

    • Nordens nærområder, særlig de baltiske landene

    • Energirelaterte transportaspekter

    • Energisektoren på Grønland, Færøyene og Åland

    • Andre tverrgående programmer og prosjekter og internasjonalt samarbeid

  • Public defence: 2018-01-19 09:00 A5_R0, Umeå
    Kurhade, Chaitanya
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Interplay between tick-borne encephalitis virus and the host innate immunity2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Flaviviruses are important emerging and re-emerging arthropod-borne pathogens that cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans. It consists of globally distributed human pathogens such as tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), West Nile virus (WNV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), yellow fever virus (YFV), dengue virus (DENV), and Zika virus (ZIKV). Depending on type, flaviviruses can cause a variety of symptoms ranging from haemorrhage to neurological disorders.

    Virus infection is detected by host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), and through downstream signalling it leads to the production of interferons (IFNs). These IFNs then act in an autocrine or paracrine manner on the cells to induce various IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), which have antiviral roles. However, the amount of IFN produced depends on the nature of the PRRs used by host cells to detect a particular virus. Although there are many PRRs present in the host cells, their relative contribution in different cell types and against a specific virus may vary. In the first study, we determined the importance of IPS-1 signalling in immunity and pathogenicity of tick-borne flaviviruses. This is an adaptor protein for cytoplasmic RIG-I-like receptors. Using IPS-1-deficient mice, we showed its importance against TBEV and Langat virus (LGTV) infection (the LGTV model virus belongs to the TBEV serogroup). Absence of IPS-1 leads to uncontrolled virus replication in the central nervous system (CNS), but it has only a minor role in shaping the humoral immune response at the periphery. LGTV-infected IPS-1-deficient mice showed apoptosis, activation of microglia and astrocytes, an elevated proinflammatory response, and recruitment of immune cells to the CNS. Interestingly, we also found that IFN-b upregulation after viral infection was dependent on IPS-1 in the olfactory bulb of the brain.  Thus, our results suggest that local immune microenvironment of distinct brain regions is critical for determination of virus permissiveness.

    Interferons can upregulate several ISGs. Viperin is one such ISG that has a broad-spectrum antiviral action against many viruses. However, the importance of cell type and the significance of viperin in controlling many flavivirus infections in vivo is not known. Using viperin-deficient mice, we found that viperin was necessary for restriction of LGTV replication in the olfactory bulb and cerebrum, but not in the cerebellum. This finding was also confirmed with primary neurons derived from these brain regions. Furthermore, we could also show the particular importance of viperin in cortical neurons against TBEV, WNV, and ZIKV infection. The results suggested that a single ISG can shape the susceptibility and immune response to a flavivirus in different regions of the brain.

    Although viperin is such an important ISG against flaviviruses, the exact molecular mechanism of action is not known. To understand the mechanism, we performed co-immunoprecipitation screening to identify TBEV proteins that could interact with viperin. While viperin interacted with the prM, E, NS2A, NS2B, and NS3 proteins of TBEV, its interaction with NS3 led to its degradation through the proteosomal pathway. Furthermore, viperin could reduce the stability of other viperin-binding TBEV proteins in an NS3-dependent manner. We screened for viperin activity regarding interaction with NS3 proteins of other flaviviruses. Viperin interacted with NS3 of JEV, ZIKV, and YFV, but selectively degraded NS3 proteins of TBEV and ZIKV, and this activity correlated with its antiviral activity against these viruses.

    The last study was based on in vivo characterization of the newly isolated MucAr HB 171/11 strain of TBEV which caused unusual gastrointestinal and constitutional symptoms. This strain was compared with another strain, Torö-2003, of the same European subtype of TBEV but isolated from the different focus. Here we found unique differences in their neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence, and in the immune response to these two strains.

    In summary, my work shed some light on the interplay between tick-borne flavivirus and the innate immune system. I have shown two examples of CNS region-specific differences in innate immune response regarding both in IFN induction pathways and antiviral effectors. Furthermore, we have investigated the in vivo pathogenesis of a strain of TBEV that caused unusual gastrointestinal and constitutional symptoms.

  • Manzoor, Saira
    et al.
    Manzoor, Mirfa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    Hussain, Walayat
    An Analysis of Energy-Efficient Approaches Used for Virtual Machines and Data Centres2017In: 2017 IEEE 14th International Conference on e-Business Engineering (ICEBE), IEEE, 2017, 91-96 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For online business markets with a large customer base, the use of market-platforms is leading to a rapid generation of a huge amount of data. Such businesses face challenges to satisfy their users. A quantitative research approach has been used to examine big data in online markets, but there is also a need for qualitative research in this area, so as to understand the relationship between big data, online markets. The present research presents an analysis of the various case study approaches that are employed by researchers in this area. We also analyze trends in case study techniques in this area. The research problem is taken on as a research case for the present study. The results of the study should contribute the implementation of big-data in online markets research.

  • Manzoor, Mirfa
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Informatics.
    A Review of Case Study Approaches and Techniques in Studies on Big Data in Online Markets2017In: 2017 IEEE 14th International Conference on e-Business Engineering (ICEBE), IEEE, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For online business markets with a large customer base, the use of market-platforms is leading to a rapid generation of a huge amount of data. Such businesses face challenges to satisfy their users. A quantitative research approach has been used to examine big data in online markets, but there is also a need for qualitative research in this area, so as to understand the relationship between big data, online markets. The present research presents an analysis of the various case study approaches that are employed by researchers in this area. We also analyze trends in case study techniques in this area. The research problem is taken on as a research case for the present study. The results of the study should contribute the implementation of big-data in online markets research.

  • Siddiqui, Afzal
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Takashima, Ryuta
    Chiba Institute of Technology, , .
    Bouncing Back: Assessing the Resilience of Infrastructure Projects and the Use of Average Outage Factors2017In: Annual International Real Options Conference, Annual International Real Options Conference , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • Winberg, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Strinnholm, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    West, Christina E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Perzanowski, Matthew S.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    High incidence and remission of reported food hypersensitivity in Swedish children followed from 8 to 12 years of age: a population based cohort study2014In: Clinical and Translational Allergy, ISSN 2045-7022, E-ISSN 2045-7022, Vol. 4, 32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few population-based cohort studies have examined reported food hypersensitivity longitudinally. We investigated prevalence, incidence and remission of perceived food hypersensitivity among schoolchildren from 8 to 12 years of age, and risk factors associated with incidence and remission. Methods: A population-based cohort including all 7-8 year-old children in three Swedish towns was recruited in 2006. A total of 2,585 (96% of invited) children participated in a parental questionnaire. The children in two of the towns, n = 1,700 (90% of invited) also participated in skin-prick-testing with airborne allergens. The cohort was followed using the same methods at 11-12 years of age. At study follow up, specific IgE to foods was analyzed in a randomized subset of children (n = 652). Results: The prevalence of perceived food hypersensitivity increased from 21% at 8 years to 26% at 12 years of age. During this four-year-period, the cumulative incidence of food hypersensitivity was high (15%), as was remission (33%). This pattern was particularly evident for hypersensitivity to cow's milk, while the incidence of hypersensitivity to other foods was lower. Female sex, allergic heredity, current rhinitis and allergic sensitization were associated with the incidence of food hypersensitivity and allergic sensitization was negatively associated with remission. Risk-factor-patterns for both incidence and remission were different for hypersensitivity to milk compared with hypersensitivity to other foods. Generally, the agreement between reported food hypersensitivity and IgE-sensitization to the implicated food was poor. Conclusions: In this longitudinal, population-based cohort-study perceived food hypersensitivity was common among children between ages 8 and 12, often transient and not well correlated with food-specific IgE. While these findings suggest an overestimated prevalence of food hypersensitivity, the public-health-significance remains high as they reflect the perceived reality to which the children adapt their life and food intakes.

  • Eriksson, Maria
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Redfors, Andreas
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Learning in Science and Mathematics (LISMA).
    Digital loggbok för reflektion och lärande under VFU2017In: Högskolepedagogisk debatt, ISSN 2000-9216, no 2, 4-17 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • Gold, Judith E.
    et al.
    Hallman, David M.
    Hellstrom, Fredrik
    Björklund, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Univ Gävle, Ctr Musculoskeletal Res, Dept Occupat & Publ Hlth Sci, Gävle, Sweden.
    Crenshaw, Albert G.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Barbe, Mary F.
    Ali, Sayed
    Systematic review of quantitative imaging biomarkers for neck and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders2017In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 18, 395Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study systematically summarizes quantitative imaging biomarker research in non-traumatic neck and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). There were two research questions: 1) Are there quantitative imaging biomarkers associated with the presence of neck and shoulder MSDs?, 2) Are there quantitative imaging biomarkers associated with the severity of neck and shoulder MSDs? Methods: PubMed and SCOPUS were used for the literature search. One hundred and twenty-five studies met primary inclusion criteria. Data were extracted from 49 sufficient quality studies. Results: Most of the 125 studies were cross-sectional and utilized convenience samples of patients as both cases and controls. Only half controlled for potential confounders via exclusion or in the analysis. Approximately one-third reported response rates. In sufficient quality articles, 82% demonstrated at least one statistically significant association between the MSD(s) and biomarker(s) studied. The literature synthesis suggested that neck muscle size may be decreased in neck pain, and trapezius myalgia and neck/shoulder pain may be associated with reduced vascularity in the trapezius and reduced trapezius oxygen saturation at rest and in response to upper extremity tasks. Reduced vascularity in the supraspinatus tendon may also be a feature in rotator cuff tears. Five of eight studies showed an association between a quantitative imaging marker and MSD severity. Conclusions: Although research on quantitative imaging biomarkers is still in a nascent stage, some MSD biomarkers were identified. There are limitations in the articles examined, including possible selection bias and inattention to potentially confounding factors. Recommendations for future studies are provided.

  • Lindner, Philip
    et al.
    Budhiraja, Meenal
    Westerman, Johan
    Savic, Ivanka
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tiihonen, Jari
    Hodgins, Sheilagh
    White matter correlates of psychopathic traits in a female community sample2017In: Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience, ISSN 1749-5016, E-ISSN 1749-5024, Vol. 12, no 9, 1500-1510 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychopathy comprises interpersonal, affective, lifestyle and antisocial facets that vary dimensionally in the population and are associated with criminal offending and adverse psychosocial outcomes. Evidence associating these facets with white matter microstructure of the uncinate fasciculus and the cingulum tracts is inconsistent and derives principally from studies of male offenders. In a sample of 99 young women presenting a range of scores on the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version, we used Diffusion Tensor Imaging, tractography and Tract-Based Spatial Statistics to investigate microstructure across the brain and of the uncinate fasciculus and cingulum. Right uncinate fasciculus microstructure was negatively associated with the interpersonal facet, while cingulum integrity was not associated with any facet of psychopathy. Whole-brain analyses revealed that both affective and lifestyle facets were negatively correlated with white matter microstructure adjacent to the fusiform gyrus, and the interpersonal facet correlated negatively with the integrity of the fornix. Findings survived adjustment for the other facet scores, and age, verbal and performance IQ. A similar negative association between the interpersonal facet and uncinate fasciculus integrity was previously observed in male offenders. Thus, previous evidence showing that psychopathic traits are associated with functional and structural abnormalities within limbic networks may also apply to females.

  • Karlsson, Johan
    et al.
    Röös, Elin
    Sjunnestrand, Tove
    Pira, Kajsa
    Larsson, Malin
    Andersen, Bente Hessellund
    Sørensen, Jacob
    Veistola, Tapani
    Rantakokko, Jaana
    Manninen, Sirkku
    Brubæk, Stein
    Future Nordic Diets: Exploring ways for sustainably feeding the Nordics2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Farming is the foundation of our food system. While the prerequisite for farming is a clean environment and a diverse nature, agriculture is currently the cause of major environmental problems, including greenhouse gas and nitrogen emissions. The challenge to protect our environment and feed the world sometimes seem insurmountable, but solutions might be just around the corner. This report describes two food system scenarios for Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, where the majority of food is produced within the region using organic farming practices and where livestock is mainly fed on grass and by-products not suitable for human consumption. The results show that we could feed the projected Nordic population in 2030 on organic food, mostly grown within the region, while reducing the climate and nitrogen footprints of our food system.

  • Public defence: 2018-01-19 09:00 GM128 Axel Hambergsalen, Uppsala
    Marchenko, Sergey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University.
    Subsurface fluxes of mass and energy at the accumulation zone of Lomonosovfonna ice cap, Svalbard2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Glaciers cover ca 10% of the Earth's land and are found in the high altitudes and latitudes. They are important components of environmental systems due to the multiple feedbacks linking them with the atmosphere, hydrosphere and periglacial landscapes. The cold sloping surfaces of glaciers change the patterns of atmospheric circulation at different scales and at the same time glaciers are largely controlled by climate. They are commonly used as climatic archives for reconstruction of the past environmental changes based on evidences from the areas affected by glaciation at the moment and in the past. Glaciers are the largest fresh-water reservoirs on our planet and runoff thereof significantly affects the global sea level and life in glaciated catchments. However, melt- and rain-induced runoff from glaciers greatly depends on the subsurface conditions which thus need to be taken into account, particularly in a changing climate.

    This thesis focuses on the processes of subsurface mass and energy exchange in the accumulation zones of glaciers, which are largely driven by the climate at the surface. Results are largely based on empirical data from Lomonosovfonna ice cap, Svalbard, collected during field campaigns in 2012-2017. Observations of subsurface density and stratigraphy using shallow cores, video records from boreholes and radar surveys returned detailed descriptions of the snow and firn layering. The subsurface temperature data collected using multiple thermistor strings provided insights into several subsurface processes. The temperature values measured during three summer seasons were used to constrain the suggested parameterization of deep preferential water flow through snow and firn. The part of data recorded during the cold seasons was employed for an inverse modelling exercise resulting in optimized values of effective thermal conductivity of the subsurface profile. These results are then used to compute the subsurface water content by comparing the simulated and measured rates of freezing front propagation after the melt season in 2014.

    The field observations and quantitative estimates provide further empirical evidences of preferential water flow in snow/firn packs at glaciers. Results presented in the thesis call for implementation of description of the process in layered models simulating the subsurface fluxes of energy and mass at glaciers. This will result in a better understanding of glacier response to the past and future climatic changes and more accurate estimates of glacier runoff.

  • Abel, Olubunmi
    et al.
    Shatunov, Aleksey
    Jones, Ashley R.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Powell, John F.
    Al-Chalabi, Ammar
    Development of a Smartphone App for a Genetics Website: The Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Online Genetics Database (ALSoD)2013In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 1, no 2, e18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The ALS Online Genetics Database (ALSoD) website holds mutation, geographical, and phenotype data on genes implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and links to bioinformatics resources, publications, and tools for analysis. On average, there are 300 unique visits per day, suggesting a high demand from the research community. To enable wider access, we developed a mobile-friendly version of the website and a smartphone app. Objective: We sought to compare data traffic before and after implementation of a mobile version of the website to assess utility. Methods: We identified the most frequently viewed pages using Google Analytics and our in-house analytic monitoring. For these, we optimized the content layout of the screen, reduced image sizes, and summarized available information. We used the Microsoft. NET framework mobile detection property (HttpRequest. IsMobileDevice in the Request. Browser object in conjunction with HttpRequest. UserAgent), which returns a true value if the browser is a recognized mobile device. For app development, we used the Eclipse integrated development environment with Android plug-ins. We wrapped the mobile website version with the WebView object in Android. Simulators were downloaded to test and debug the applications. Results: The website automatically detects access from a mobile phone and redirects pages to fit the smaller screen. Because the amount of data stored on ALSoD is very large, the available information for display using smartphone access is deliberately restricted to improve usability. Visits to the website increased from 2231 to 2820, yielding a 26% increase from the pre-mobile to post-mobile period and an increase from 103 to 340 visits (230%) using mobile devices (including tablets). The smartphone app is currently available on BlackBerry and Android devices and will be available shortly on iOS as well. Conclusions: Further development of the ALSoD website has allowed access through smartphones and tablets, either through the website or directly through a mobile app, making genetic data stored on the database readily accessible to researchers and patients across multiple devices.

  • Hayashi, Masaki
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
    Bachelder, Steven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
    Nakajima, Masayuki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
    Shishikui, Yoshiaki
    Meiji University.
    Rap Music Video Generator: Write a Script to Make Your Rap Music Video with Synthesized Voice and CG Animation2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have made an application to make rap music video with CG animation by writing out a simple script. Aquestalk and TVML (TV program Making Language) are used for synthesized voice and real-time CG generation, respectively. A user can enjoy making rap music video easily by writing speech texts and character movements along with the music beat in the script.

  • Lekander, Ingrid
    et al.
    Willers, Carl
    Ekstrand, Elisabeth
    von Euler, Mia
    Fagervall-Yttling, Birgitta
    Henricson, Lena
    Kostulas, Konstantinos
    Lilja, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Sunnerhagen, Katharina S.
    Teichert, Jorg
    Pessah-Rasmussen, Helene
    Hospital comparison of stroke care in Sweden: a register-based study2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 9, e015244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose The objective of this study was to estimate the level of health outcomes and resource use at a hospital level during the first year after a stroke, and to identify any potential differences between hospitals after adjusting for patient characteristics (case mix). Method Data from several registries were linked on individual level: seven regional patient administrative systems, Swedish Stroke Register, Statistics Sweden, National Board of Health and Welfare and Swedish Social Insurance Agency. The study population consisted of 14 125 patients presenting with a stroke during 2010. Case-mix adjusted analysis of hospital differences was made on five aspects of health outcomes and resource use, 1 year post-stroke. Results The results indicated that 26% of patients had died within a year of their stroke. Among those who survived, almost 5% had a recurrent stroke and 40% were left with a disability. On average, the patients had 22 inpatient days and 23 outpatient visits, and 13% had moved into special housing. There were significant variations between hospitals in levels of health outcomes achieved and resources used after adjusting for case mix. Conclusion Differences in health outcomes and resource use between hospitals were substantial and not entirely explained by differences in patient mix, indicating tendencies of unequal stroke care in Sweden. Healthcare organisation of regions and other structural features could potentially explain parts of the differences identified.

  • Osman, Fatumo
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska institutet.
    Salari, Raziye
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska institutet.
    Schön, Ulla-Karin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Effects of a culturally tailored parenting support programme in Somali-born parents' mental health and sense of competence in parenting: a randomised controlled trial2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 12, e017600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally tailored parenting support programme on Somali-born parents' mental health and sense of competence in parenting.

    DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial.

    SETTING: A city in the middle of Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Somali-born parents (n=120) with children aged 11-16 years and self-perceived stress in their parenting were randomised to an intervention group (n=60) or a waiting-list control group (n=60).

    INTERVENTION: Parents in the intervention group received culturally tailored societal information combined with the Connect parenting programme during 12 weeks for 1-2 hours per week. The intervention consisted of a standardised training programme delivered by nine group leaders of Somali background.

    OUTCOME: The General Health Questionnaire 12 was used to measure parents' mental health and the Parenting Sense of Competence scale to measure parent satisfaction and efficacy in the parent role. Analysis was conducted using intention-to-treat principles.

    RESULTS: The results indicated that parents in the intervention group showed significant improvement in mental health compared with the parents in the control group at a 2-month follow-up: B=3.62, 95% CI 2.01 to 5.18, p<0.001. Further, significant improvement was found for efficacy (B=-6.72, 95% CI -8.15 to -5.28, p<0.001) and satisfaction (B=-4.48, 95% CI -6.27 to -2.69, p<0.001) for parents in the intervention group. Parents' satisfaction mediated the intervention effect on parental mental health (β=-0.88, 95% CI -1.84 to -0.16, p=0.047).

    CONCLUSION: The culturally tailored parenting support programme led to improved mental health of Somali-born parents and their sense of competence in parenting 2 months after the intervention. The study underlines the importance of acknowledging immigrant parents' need for societal information in parent support programmes and the importance of delivering these programmes in a culturally sensitive manner.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02114593.

  • Hayashi, Masaki
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
    Shishikui, Yoshiaki
    Meiji University.
    Bachelder, Steven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
    Nakajima, Masayuki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Game Design.
    ラップスクリプト: テキストを書いて音声合成とCGアニメのラップが作れる2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    We have made an application to make rap music with CG animation by writing out a simple script. Aquestalk and TVML are used for synthesized voice and real-time CG generation, respectively. A user can enjoy making rap music video easily by writing speech texts and character movements along with music beat in the script.

  • Paige, Ellie
    et al.
    Barrett, Jessica
    Pennells, Lisa
    Sweeting, Michael
    Willeit, Peter
    Di Angelantonio, Emanuele
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Nordestgaard, Børge G.
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Goldbourt, Uri
    Best, Lyle G.
    Assmann, Gerd
    Salonen, Jukka T.
    Nietert, Paul J.
    Verschuren, W. M. Monique
    Brunner, Eric J.
    Kronmal, Richard A.
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Bakker, Stephan J. L.
    Dagenais, Gilles R.
    Sato, Shinichi
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Willeit, Johann
    Onat, Altan
    de la Cámara, Agustin Gómez
    Roussel, Ronan
    Völzke, Henry
    Dankner, Rachel
    Tipping, Robert W.
    Meade, Tom W.
    Donfrancesco, Chiara
    Kuller, Lewis H.
    Peters, Annette
    Gallacher, John
    Kromhout, Daan
    Iso, Hiroyasu
    Knuiman, Matthew
    Casiglia, Edoardo
    Kavousi, Maryam
    Palmieri, Luigi
    Sundström, Johan
    Davis, Barry R.
    Njølstad, Inger
    Couper, David
    Danesh, John
    Thompson, Simon G.
    Wood, Angela
    Use of Repeated Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Measurements to Improve Cardiovascular Disease Risk Prediction: An Individual-Participant-Data Meta-Analysis2017In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 186, no 8, 899-907 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The added value of incorporating information from repeated blood pressure and cholesterol measurements to predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk has not been rigorously assessed. We used data on 191,445 adults from the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration (38 cohorts from 17 countries with data encompassing 1962-2014) with more than 1 million measurements of systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Over a median 12 years of follow-up, 21,170 CVD events occurred. Risk prediction models using cumulative mean values of repeated measurements and summary measures from longitudinal modeling of the repeated measurements were compared with models using measurements from a single time point. Risk discrimination (C-index) and net reclassification were calculated, and changes in C-indices were meta-analyzed across studies. Compared with the single-time-point model, the cumulative means and longitudinal models increased the C-index by 0.0040 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.0023, 0.0057) and 0.0023 (95% CI: 0.0005, 0.0042), respectively. Reclassification was also improved in both models; compared with the single-time-point model, overall net reclassification improvements were 0.0369 (95% CI: 0.0303, 0.0436) for the cumulative-means model and 0.0177 (95% CI: 0.0110, 0.0243) for the longitudinal model. In conclusion, incorporating repeated measurements of blood pressure and cholesterol into CVD risk prediction models slightly improves risk prediction.

  • Torres, Maria J.
    et al.
    Bueno, Emilio
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). CSIC, Estn Expt Zaidin, Dept Soil Microbiol & Symbiot Syst, Granada, Spain.
    Jimenez-Leiva, Andrea
    Cabrera, Juan J.
    Bedmar, Eulogio J.
    Mesa, Socorro
    Delgado, Maria J.
    FixK(2) Is the Main Transcriptional Activator of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens nosRZDYFLX Genes in Response to Low Oxygen2017In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 8, 1621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The powerful greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O) has a strong potential to drive climate change. Soils are the major source of N2O and microbial nitrification and denitrification the main processes involved. The soybean endosymbiont Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is considered a model to study rhizobial denitrification, which depends on the napEDABC, nirK, norCBQD, and nosRZDYFLX genes. In this bacterium, the role of the regulatory cascade FixLJ-FixK(2)-NnrR in the expression of napEDABC, nirK, and norCBQD genes involved in N2O synthesis has been previously unraveled. However, much remains to be discovered regarding the regulation of the respiratory N2O reductase (N2OR), the key enzyme that mitigates N2O emissions. In this work, we have demonstrated that nosRZDYFLX genes constitute an operon which is transcribed from a major promoter located upstream of the nosR gene. Low oxygen was shown to be the main inducer of expression of nosRZDYFLX genes and N2OR activity, FixK(2) being the regulatory protein involved in such control. Further, by using an in vitro transcription assay with purified FixK(2) protein and B. diazoefficiens RNA polymerase we were able to show that the nosRZDYFLX genes are direct targets of FixK(2).

  • Zas, Rafael
    et al.
    Björklund, Niklas
    Sampedro, Luis
    Hellqvist, Claes
    Karlsson, Bo
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Nordlander, Göran
    Genetic variation in resistance of Norway spruce seedlings to damage by the pine weevil Hylobius abietis2017In: Tree Genetics & Genomes, ISSN 1614-2942, E-ISSN 1614-2950, Vol. 13, no 5, 111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regeneration of northern conifer forests is commonly performed by reforestation with genetically improved materials obtained from long-term breeding programs focused on productivity and timber quality. Sanitary threats can, however, compromise the realization of the expected genetic gain. Including pest resistance traits in the breeding programs may contribute to a sustainable protection. Here we quantified the variation in different components of resistance of Norway spruce to its main pest, the pine weevil Hylobius abietis. We followed insect damage in two large progeny trials (52 open-pollinated families with 100-200 individuals per family and trial) naturally infested by the pine weevil. Pine weevils damaged between 17 and 48% of the planted seedlings depending on the trial and year, and mortality due to weevil damage was up to 11.4%. The results indicate significant genetic variation in resistance to the pine weevil, and importantly, the variation was highly consistent across trials irrespective of contrasting incidence levels. Individual heritability estimates for the different components of seedling resistance were consistently low, but family heritabilities were moderate (0.53 to 0.81). While forward selections and breeding for higher resistance seem not feasible, backwards selections of the best parent trees emerge as a putative alternative to reduce weevil damage. A positive genetic correlation between early growth potential and probability of being attacked by the weevil was also observed, but the relationship was weak and appeared only in one of the trials. Overall, results presented here open the door to a new attractive way for reducing damage caused by this harmful pest.

  • Sonnek, Karin Mossberg
    et al.
    Martensson, Tomas
    Veiback, Ester
    Tunved, Peter
    Grahn, Hakan
    von Schoenberg, Pontus
    Brannstrom, Niklas
    Bucht, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Swedish Def Res Agcy, Div CBRN Def & Secur, Umea, Sweden.
    The impacts of a Laki-like eruption on the present Swedish society2017In: Natural Hazards, ISSN 0921-030X, E-ISSN 1573-0840, Vol. 88, no 3, 1565-1590 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we analyse and discuss the possible impacts on the Swedish society of a volcanic eruption on Iceland, emitting ash particles and large quantities of sulphur dioxide. A scenario was developed, based on the historical Laki eruption of 1783-1784, to describe the content of a potential sulphur fog over time in Sweden. Due to its high complexity and the many uncertainties in the underpinning scientific data, the scenario was developed using a cross-disciplinary approach incorporating experts from different scientific fields. An analysis of the impacts of the hazard on human health, environment and technical equipment was then performed and, finally, representatives from national authorities assessed the overall societal challenges in responding to the consequences of a massive volcanic eruption. The analysis shows that it is the peak concentrations of sulphur dioxide and sulphuric acid rather than the longer periods of moderate concentrations that contribute most to the negative consequences for human health and environment. Altogether, three societal challenges were identified: the ability to compile and disseminate relevant information fast enough, to perform continuous measurements of concentrations of different substances in affected areas and to meet the large demand for medical care.

  • Molde, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Söderström, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Laurell, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Parkinsonian symptoms in normal pressure hydrocephalus: a population-based study2017In: Journal of Neurology, ISSN 0340-5354, E-ISSN 1432-1459, Vol. 264, no 10, 2141-2148 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It may be challenging to differentiate normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) from neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. In this population-based study, we wanted to describe the frequency of parkinsonian symptoms among individuals with and without NPH, and whether the motor examination part of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-m) score differs between these groups. Furthermore, we wanted to find out whether there was a relationship between UPDRS-m score, NPH symptoms, and radiological signs of NPH. A sample of 168 individuals over the age of 65 with and without self-reported symptoms of NPH underwent a computerized tomography of the brain and clinical examination, including UPDRS-m to grade parkinsonian symptoms. According to diagnostic guidelines, 38 fulfilled criteria for NPH, whereas 130 had unlikely NPH. Bradykinesia was significantly more common among those with NPH (79%) compared to those with unlikely NPH (32%) (p < 0.001). The corresponding figures for rigidity were 43 vs. 15% (p < 0.001), for postural instability 71 vs. 22% (p < 0.001), and for tremor at rest 5 vs. 6% (not significant). The total UPDRS-m score was significantly higher among individuals with NPH (median = 12) than without (median = 1) and correlated significantly with the degree of NPH symptoms (r = -0.72) and ventriculomegaly (r = 0.31). In this study, parkinsonian symptoms, except resting tremor, were frequent in individuals with NPH and correlated with the severity of NPH symptoms. Asymmetric symptoms were uncommon. We recommend a liberal use of neuroradiological imaging when investigating a patient with parkinsonian features.

  • Bore, Nils
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Object Instance Detection and Dynamics Modeling in a Long-Term Mobile Robot Context2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last years, simple service robots such as autonomous vacuum cleaners and lawn mowers have become commercially available and increasingly common. The next generation of service robots should perform more advanced tasks, such as to clean up objects. Robots then need to learn to robustly navigate, and manipulate, cluttered environments, such as an untidy living room. In this thesis, we focus on representations for tasks such as general cleaning and fetching of objects. We discuss requirements for these specific tasks, and argue that solving them would be generally useful, because of their object-centric nature. We rely on two fundamental insights in our approach to understand environments on a fine-grained level. First, many of today's robot map representations are limited to the spatial domain, and ignore that there is a time axis that constrains how much an environment may change during a given period. We argue that it is of critical importance to also consider the temporal domain. By studying the motion of individual objects, we can enable tasks such as general cleaning and object fetching. The second insight comes from that mobile robots are becoming more robust. They can therefore collect large amounts of data from those environments. With more data, unsupervised learning of models becomes feasible, allowing the robot to adapt to changes in the environment, and to scenarios that the designer could not foresee. We view these capabilities as vital for robots to become truly autonomous. The combination of unsupervised learning and dynamics modelling creates an interesting symbiosis: the dynamics vary between different environments and between the objects in one environment, and learning can capture these variations. A major difficulty when modeling environment dynamics is that the whole environment can not be observed at one time, since the robot is moving between different places. We demonstrate how this can be dealt with in a principled manner, by modeling several modes of object movement. We also demonstrate methods for detection and learning of objects and structures in the static parts of the maps. Using the complete system, we can represent and learn many aspects of the full environment. In real-world experiments, we demonstrate that our system can keep track of varied objects in large and highly dynamic environments.​

  • Felsberg, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Five years after the Deep Learning revolution of computer vision: State of the art methods for online image and video analysis2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this document is to reect on novel and upcoming methods for computer vision that might have relevance for application in robot vision and video analytics. The document covers many dierent sub-elds of computer vision, most of which have been addressed by our research activity at the computer vision laboratory. The report has been written based on a request of, and supported by, FOI.

  • Prescott, Susan L.
    et al.
    Larcombe, Danica-Lea
    Logan, Alan C.
    West, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics. World Univ Network, In FLAME Global Network, West New York, NJ USA.
    Burks, Wesley
    Caraballo, Luis
    Levin, Michael
    Van Etten, Eddie
    Horwitz, Pierre
    Kozyrskyj, Anita
    Campbell, Dianne E.
    The skin microbiome: impact of modern environments on skin ecology, barrier integrity, and systemic immune programming2017In: World Allergy Organization Journal, ISSN 1731-3317, E-ISSN 1939-4551, Vol. 10, 29Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin barrier structure and function is essential to human health. Hitherto unrecognized functions of epidermal keratinocytes show that the skin plays an important role in adapting whole-body physiology to changing environments, including the capacity to produce a wide variety of hormones, neurotransmitters and cytokine that can potentially influence whole-body states, and quite possibly, even emotions. Skin microbiota play an integral role in the maturation and homeostatic regulation of keratinocytes and host immune networks with systemic implications. As our primary interface with the external environment, the biodiversity of skin habitats is heavily influenced by the biodiversity of the ecosystems in which we reside. Thus, factors which alter the establishment and health of the skin microbiome have the potential to predispose to not only cutaneous disease, but also other inflammatory non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Indeed, disturbances of the stratum corneum have been noted in allergic diseases (eczema and food allergy), psoriasis, rosacea, acne vulgaris and with the skin aging process. The built environment, global biodiversity losses and declining nature relatedness are contributing to erosion of diversity at a micro-ecological level, including our own microbial habitats. This emphasises the importance of ecological perspectives in overcoming the factors that drive dysbiosis and the risk of inflammatory diseases across the life course.

  • Friberg, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, University Library.
    Kågedal, Anna
    SLU University, Sweden.
    Experience mapping (or the experience of delivering workshops at UXLibs3)2017In: User Experience in Libraries Yearbook 2017: stories, techniques, insights / [ed] Andy Priestner, UX Libraries , 2017, 191-194 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • Hansson, Henrik
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, HLK, Praktiknära utbildningsforskning (PUF), Mathematics Education Research. Learning Study.
    Keyfactors to promote a sustainable culture of an adaptive form of Lesson/Learning study in Sweden and what the keyfactors implies to leadership2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • Public defence: 2018-01-26 10:00 F3, Stockholm
    Saffar Shamshirgar, Davood
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Fast methods for electrostatic calculations in molecular dynamics simulations2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with fast and efficient methods for electrostatic calculations with application in molecular dynamics simulations. The electrostatic calculations are often the most expensive part of MD simulations of charged particles. Therefore, fast and efficient algorithms are required to accelerate these calculations. In this thesis, two types of methods have been considered: FFT-based methods and fast multipole methods (FMM).

    The major part of this thesis deals with fast N.log(N) and spectrally accurate methods for accelerating the computation of pairwise interactions with arbitrary periodicity. These methods are based on the Ewald decomposition and have been previously introduced for triply and doubly periodic problems under the name of Spectral Ewald (SE) method. We extend the method for problems with singly periodic boundary conditions, in which one of three dimensions is periodic. By introducing an adaptive fast Fourier transform, we reduce the cost of upsampling in the non periodic directions and show that the total cost of computation is comparable with the triply periodic counterpart. Using an FFT-based technique for solving free-space harmonic problems, we are able to unify the treatment of zero and nonzero Fourier modes for the doubly and singly periodic problems. Applying the same technique, we extend the SE method for cases with free-space boundary conditions, i.e. without any periodicity.

    This thesis is also concerned with the fast multipole method (FMM) for electrostatic calculations. The FMM is very efficient for parallel processing but it introduces irregularities in the electrostatic potential and force, which can cause an energy drift in MD simulations. In this part of the thesis we introduce a regularized version of the FMM, useful for MD simulations, which approximately conserves energy over a long time period and even for low accuracy requirements. The method introduces a smooth transition over the boundary of boxes in the FMM tree and therefore it removes the discontinuity at the error level inherent in the FMM.

  • Public defence: 2018-01-26 13:00 Kollegiesalen, Stockholm
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Making Preciousness: Interaction Design Through Studio Crafts2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation explores value-creation in interaction design through practical collaborations with studio craftspersons. A focus is on the meaning of “preciousness” from a design perspective – what I refer to as Making Preciousness –  which highlights aspects of material properties, design processes, and the attitude to the design space. Theoretically, the work takes inspiration from the Japanese philosophy of Wabi-Sabi, which is based on the fact that things are impermanent, incomplete, and imperfect. This reflects a view of preciousness beyond notions of practical use, luxury or monetary cost. In addition to theoretical studies, I engaged in practice-based research at the intersection of interaction design and studio crafts, in the domains of leather, silversmith and textile crafting. Through an approach that blends these practices with the making of interactive artefacts, preciousness for interaction design was explored.

    Through this work, I extract three qualities, all of which are closely linked to attributes and values ​​embedded in the craft practices examined. I refer to these as resourceful composition, material sensuality and the aiming for mattering artefacts. Resourceful composition refers to approaching a design space “resourcefully”, meaning that the designer actively values and uses the specific qualities of materials and tools consciously, for what they are suitable for. Material sensuality is about appreciating the sensory experience of interacting with materials, arriving through particular material qualities, such as texture, temperature or smell, but also interactive qualities. Aiming for mattering artefacts involves actively designing for impermanence, incompleteness and imperfection, and through that contributing to notions of preciousness through use, care, ownership and interaction between users and artefacts over time.

    The attitude of making preciousness can be seen as tying together materials and making with user experiences of computational artefacts. For interaction design, this points towards making processes in which computation and material knowledge, craftsmanship and aesthetic intentions are placed at the core. These values ​​relate to cultural, but also sensual experiences, which can be seen as under-explored in the design of interactive products.

  • Best, Myron G.
    et al.
    Sol, Nik
    't Veld, Sjors G. J. G. In
    Vancura, Adrienne
    Muller, Mirte
    Niemeijer, Anna-Larissa N.
    Fejes, Aniko V.
    Tjon Kon Fat, Lee-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    't Veld, Anna E. Huis In
    Leurs, Cyra
    Le Large, Tessa Y.
    Meijer, Laura L.
    Kooi, Irsan E.
    Rustenburg, Francois
    Schellen, Pepijn
    Verschueren, Heleen
    Post, Edward
    Wedekind, Laurine E.
    Bracht, Jillian
    Esenkbrink, Michelle
    Wils, Leon
    Favaro, Francesca
    Schoonhoven, Jilian D.
    Tannous, Jihane
    Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne
    Kazemier, Geert
    Giovannetti, Elisa
    Reijneveld, Jaap C.
    Idema, Sander
    Killestein, Joep
    Heger, Michal
    de Jager, Saskia C.
    Urbanus, Rolf T.
    Hoefer, Imo E.
    Pasterkamp, Gerard
    Mannhalter, Christine
    Gomez-Arroyo, Jose
    Bogaard, Harm-Jan
    Noske, David P.
    Vandertop, W. Peter
    van den Broek, Daan
    Ylstra, Bauke
    Nilsson, Jonas A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Canc Ctr Amsterdam, Dept Neurosurg, De Boelelaan 1117, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Wesseling, Pieter
    Karachaliou, Niki
    Rosell, Rafael
    Lee-Lewandrowski, Elizabeth
    Lewandrowski, Kent B.
    Tannous, Bakhos A.
    de Langen, Adrianus J.
    Smit, Egbert F.
    van den Heuvel, Michel M.
    Wurdinger, Thomas
    Swarm Intelligence-Enhanced Detection of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using Tumor-Educated Platelets2017In: Cancer Cell, ISSN 1535-6108, E-ISSN 1878-3686, Vol. 32, no 2, 238-252 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood-based liquid biopsies, including tumor-educated blood platelets (TEPs), have emerged as promising biomarker sources for non-invasive detection of cancer. Here we demonstrate that particle-swarm optimization (PSO)-enhanced algorithms enable efficient selection of RNA biomarker panels from platelet RNA sequencing libraries (n = 779). This resulted in accurate TEP-based detection of early- and late-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (n = 518 late-stage validation cohort, accuracy, 88%; AUC, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92-0.96; p < 0.001; n = 106 early-stage validation cohort, accuracy, 81%; AUC, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.83-0.95; p < 0.001), independent of age of the individuals, smoking habits, whole-blood storage time, and various inflammatory conditions. PSO enabled selection of gene panels to diagnose cancer from TEPs, suggesting that swarm intelligence may also benefit the optimization of diagnostics readout of other liquid biopsy biosources.

  • Aartsen, M. G.
    et al.
    Univ Adelaide, Dept Phys, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia..
    Ackermann, M.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Adams, J.
    Univ Canterbury, Dept Phys & Astron, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand..
    Aguilar, J. A.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac, CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Ahlers, M.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Ahrens, M.
    Stockholm Univ, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Al Samarai, I.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Phys Nucl & Corpusculaire, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland..
    Altmann, D.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany..
    Andeen, K.
    Marquette Univ, Dept Phys, Milwaukee, WI 53201 USA..
    Anderson, T.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, University Pk, PA 16802 USA..
    Ansseau, I.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac, CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Anton, G.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany..
    Arguelles, C.
    MIT, Dept Phys, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Auffenberg, J.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Axani, S.
    MIT, Dept Phys, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Bagherpour, H.
    Univ Canterbury, Dept Phys & Astron, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand..
    Bai, X.
    South Dakota Sch Mines & Technol, Phys Dept, Rapid City, SD 57701 USA..
    Barron, J. P.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada..
    Barwick, S. W.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Phys & Astron, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Baum, V.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Bay, R.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Beatty, J. J.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Phys, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.;Ohio State Univ, Ctr Cosmol & Astro Particle Phys, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.;Ohio State Univ, Dept Astron, Columbus, OH 43210 USA..
    Tjus, J. Becker
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fak Phys & Astron, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Becker, K. -H
    BenZvi, S.
    Univ Rochester, Dept Phys & Astron, Rochester, NY 14627 USA..
    Berley, D.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Bernardini, E.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Besson, D. Z.
    Univ Kansas, Dept Phys & Astron, Lawrence, KS 66045 USA..
    Binder, G.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.;Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Bindig, D.
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany..
    Blaufuss, E.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Blot, S.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Bohm, C.
    Stockholm Univ, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Borner, M.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany..
    Bos, F.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fak Phys & Astron, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Bose, D.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Dept Phys, Suwon 440746, South Korea..
    Boser, S.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Botner, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bourbeau, J.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Bradascio, F.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Braun, J.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Brayeur, L.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Brenzke, M.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Bretz, H. -P
    Bron, S.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Phys Nucl & Corpusculaire, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland..
    Burgman, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Carver, T.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Phys Nucl & Corpusculaire, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland..
    Casey, J.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Casier, M.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Cheung, E.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Chirkin, D.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Christov, A.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Phys Nucl & Corpusculaire, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland..
    Clark, K.
    SNOLAB, 1039 Reg Rd 24,Creighton Mine 9, Lively, ON P3Y IN2, Canada. Univ Wisconsin, Dept Astron, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Classen, L.
    Westfal Wilhelms Univ Munster, Inst Kernphys, D-48149 Munster, Germany..
    Coenders, S.
    Tech Univ Munich, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Collin, G. H.
    MIT, Dept Phys, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Conrad, J. M.
    MIT, Dept Phys, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Cowen, D. F.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Astron & Astrophys, University Pk, PA 16802 USA.;Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, University Pk, PA 16802 USA..
    Cross, R.
    Univ Rochester, Dept Phys & Astron, Rochester, NY 14627 USA..
    Day, M.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    de Andre, J. P. A. M.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    De Clercq, C.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    DeLaunay, J. J.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, University Pk, PA 16802 USA..
    Dembinski, H.
    Univ Delaware, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.;Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Newark, DE 19716 USA..
    De Ridder, S.
    Genet Unit, Dept Phys & Astron, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium..
    Desiati, P.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    de Vries, K. D.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    de Wasseige, G.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    de with, M.
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-12489 Berlin, Germany..
    DeYoung, T.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Diaz-Velez, J. C.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    di Lorenzo, V.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Dujmovic, H.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Dept Phys, Suwon 440746, South Korea..
    Dumm, J. P.
    Stockholm Univ, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dunkman, M.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, University Pk, PA 16802 USA..
    Eberhardt, B.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Ehrhardt, T.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Eichmann, B.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fak Phys & Astron, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Eller, P.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, University Pk, PA 16802 USA..
    Evenson, P. A.
    Univ Delaware, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.;Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Newark, DE 19716 USA..
    Fahey, S.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Fazely, A. R.
    Southern Univ, Dept Phys, Baton Rouge, LA 70813 USA..
    Felde, J.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Filimonov, K.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Finley, C.
    Stockholm Univ, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Flis, S.
    Stockholm Univ, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Franckowiak, A.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Friedman, E.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Fuchs, T.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany..
    Gaisser, T. K.
    Univ Delaware, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.;Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Newark, DE 19716 USA..
    Gallagher, J.
    Gerhardt, L.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Ghorbani, K.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Giang, W.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada..
    Glauch, T.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Gluenkamp, T.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany..
    Goldschmidt, A.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Gonzalez, J. G.
    Univ Delaware, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.;Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Newark, DE 19716 USA..
    Grant, D.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada..
    Griffith, Z.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Haack, C.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Hallgren, Allan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Halzen, F.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Hanson, K.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Hebecker, D.
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-12489 Berlin, Germany..
    Heereman, D.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac, CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Helbing, K.
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany..
    Hellauer, R.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Hickford, S.
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany..
    Hignight, J.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Hill, G. C.
    Univ Adelaide, Dept Phys, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia..
    Hoffman, K. D.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Hoffmann, R.
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany..
    Hokanson-Fasig, B.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Hoshina, K.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Tokyo, Earthquake Res Inst, Tokyo 1130032, Japan..
    Huang, F.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, University Pk, PA 16802 USA..
    Huber, M.
    Tech Univ Munich, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Hultqvist, K.
    Stockholm Univ, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    In, S.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Dept Phys, Suwon 440746, South Korea..
    Ishihara, A.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan.;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan..
    Jacobi, E.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Japaridze, G. S.
    Clark Atlanta Univ, CTSPS, Atlanta, GA 30314 USA..
    Jeong, M.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Dept Phys, Suwon 440746, South Korea..
    Jero, K.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Jones, B. J. P.
    Univ Texas Arlington, Dept Phys, 502 Yates St,Sci Hall Rm 108,Box 19059, Arlington, TX 76019 USA..
    Kalacynski, P.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Kang, W.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Dept Phys, Suwon 440746, South Korea..
    Kappes, A.
    Westfal Wilhelms Univ Munster, Inst Kernphys, D-48149 Munster, Germany..
    Karg, T.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Karle, A.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Katz, U.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany..
    Kauer, M.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Keivani, A.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, University Pk, PA 16802 USA..
    Kelley, J. L.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Kheirandish, A.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Kim, J.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Dept Phys, Suwon 440746, South Korea..
    Kim, M.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan.;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan..
    Kintscher, T.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Kiryluk, J.
    SUNY Stony Brook, Dept Phys & Astron, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA..
    Kittler, T.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany..
    Klein, S. R.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.;Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Kohnen, G.
    Univ Mons, B-7000 Mons, Belgium..
    Koirala, R.
    Univ Delaware, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.;Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Newark, DE 19716 USA..
    Kolanoski, H.
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-12489 Berlin, Germany..
    Koepke, L.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Kopper, C.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada..
    Kopper, S.
    Univ Alabama, Dept Phys & Astron, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA..
    Koschinsky, J. P.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Koskinen, D. J.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Kowalski, M.
    Humboldt Univ, Inst Phys, D-12489 Berlin, Germany.;DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Krings, K.
    Tech Univ Munich, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Kroll, M.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fak Phys & Astron, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Krueckl, G.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Kunnen, J.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Kunwar, S.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Kurahashi, N.
    Drexel Univ, Dept Phys, 3141 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Kuwabara, T.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan.;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan..
    Kyriacou, A.
    Univ Adelaide, Dept Phys, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia..
    Labare, M.
    Genet Unit, Dept Phys & Astron, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium..
    Lanfranchi, J. L.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, University Pk, PA 16802 USA..
    Larson, M. J.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Lauber, F.
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany..
    Lennarz, D.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Lesiak-Bzdak, M.
    SUNY Stony Brook, Dept Phys & Astron, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA..
    Leuermann, M.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Liu, Q. R.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Lu, L.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan.;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan..
    Lunemann, J.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Luszczak, W.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Madsen, J.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, River Falls, WI 54022 USA..
    Maggi, G.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Mahn, K. B. M.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Mancina, S.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Maruyama, R.
    Yale Univ, Dept Phys, New Haven, CT 06520 USA. Univ Oxford, Dept Phys, 1 Keble Rd, Oxford OX1 3NP, England..
    Mase, K.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan.;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan..
    Maunu, R.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    McNally, F.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Meagher, K.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac, CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Medici, M.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Meier, M.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany..
    Menne, T.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany..
    Merino, G.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Meures, T.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac, CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Miarecki, S.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.;Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Micallef, J.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Momente, G.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Montaruli, T.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Phys Nucl & Corpusculaire, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland..
    Moore, R. W.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada..
    Moulai, M.
    MIT, Dept Phys, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Nahnhauer, R.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Nakarmi, P.
    Univ Alabama, Dept Phys & Astron, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA..
    Naumann, U.
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany..
    Neer, G.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Niederhausen, H.
    SUNY Stony Brook, Dept Phys & Astron, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA..
    Nowicki, S. C.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada..
    Nygren, D. R.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Pollmann, A. Obertacke
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany..
    Olivas, A.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    O'Murchadha, A.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac, CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Palczewski, T.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.;Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Pandya, H.
    Univ Delaware, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.;Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Newark, DE 19716 USA..
    Pankova, D. V.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, University Pk, PA 16802 USA..
    Peiffer, P.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Pepper, J. A.
    Univ Alabama, Dept Phys & Astron, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA..
    de los Heros, Carlos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Pieloth, D.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany..
    Pinat, E.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac, CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Plum, M.
    Marquette Univ, Dept Phys, Milwaukee, WI 53201 USA..
    Price, P. B.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Przybylski, G. T.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Raab, C.
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Sci Fac, CP230, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Radel, L.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Rameez, M.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Rawlins, K.
    Univ Alaska Anchorage, Dept Phys & Astron, 3211 Providence Dr, Anchorage, AK 99508 USA..
    Reimann, R.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Relethford, B.
    Drexel Univ, Dept Phys, 3141 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Relich, M.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan.;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan..
    Resconi, E.
    Tech Univ Munich, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Rhode, W.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany..
    Richman, M.
    Drexel Univ, Dept Phys, 3141 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Riedel, B.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada..
    Robertson, S.
    Univ Adelaide, Dept Phys, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia..
    Rongen, M.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Rott, C.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, Dept Phys, Suwon 440746, South Korea..
    Ruhe, T.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany..
    Ryckbosch, D.
    Genet Unit, Dept Phys & Astron, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium..
    Rysewyk, D.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA..
    Salzer, T.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Herrera, S. E. Sanchez
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada..
    Sandrock, A.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany..
    Sandroos, J.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Sarkar, S.
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada..
    Satalecka, K.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Schlunder, P.
    TU Dortmund Univ, Dept Phys, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany..
    Schmidt, T.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Schneider, A.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Schoenen, S.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    SchNeberg, S.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fak Phys & Astron, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Schumacher, L.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Seckel, D.
    Univ Delaware, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.;Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Newark, DE 19716 USA..
    Seunarine, S.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, River Falls, WI 54022 USA..
    Soldin, D.
    Univ Wuppertal, Dept Phys, D-42119 Wuppertal, Germany..
    Song, M.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Spiczak, G. M.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, River Falls, WI 54022 USA..
    Spiering, C.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Stachurska, J.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Stanev, T.
    Univ Delaware, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.;Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Newark, DE 19716 USA..
    Stasik, A.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Stettner, J.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Steuer, A.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Stezelberger, T.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Stokstad, R. G.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Stoessl, A.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan.;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan..
    Strotjohann, N. L.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Sullivan, G. W.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Phys, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Sutherland, M.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Phys, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.;Ohio State Univ, Ctr Cosmol & Astro Particle Phys, Columbus, OH 43210 USA..
    Taboada, I.
    Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Phys, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA.;Georgia Inst Technol, Ctr Relativist Astrophys, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA..
    Tatar, J.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.;Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Tenholt, F.
    Ruhr Univ Bochum, Fak Phys & Astron, D-44780 Bochum, Germany..
    Ter-Antonyan, S.
    Southern Univ, Dept Phys, Baton Rouge, LA 70813 USA..
    Terliuk, A.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Tesic, G.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, University Pk, PA 16802 USA..
    Tilav, S.
    Univ Delaware, Bartol Res Inst, Newark, DE 19716 USA.;Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, Newark, DE 19716 USA..
    Toale, P. A.
    Univ Alabama, Dept Phys & Astron, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA..
    Tobin, M. N.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Toscano, S.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Tosi, D.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Tselengidou, M.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen Ctr Astroparticle Phys, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany..
    Tung, C. F.
    Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Phys, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA.;Georgia Inst Technol, Ctr Relativist Astrophys, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA..
    Turcati, A.
    Tech Univ Munich, Phys Dept, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Turley, C. F.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, University Pk, PA 16802 USA..
    Ty, B.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Unger, E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Usner, M.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Van Driessche, W.
    Genet Unit, Dept Phys & Astron, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium..
    Van Eijndhoven, N.
    VUB, Dienst ELEM, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium..
    Vanheule, S.
    Genet Unit, Dept Phys & Astron, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium..
    Van Santen, J.
    DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen, Germany..
    Vehring, M.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Vogel, E.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Vraeghe, M.
    Genet Unit, Dept Phys & Astron, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium..
    Walck, C.
    Stockholm Univ, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wallace, A.
    Univ Adelaide, Dept Phys, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia..
    Wallraff, M.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Wandler, F. D.
    Univ Adelaide, Dept Phys, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia..
    Wandkowsky, N.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Waza, A.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Weaver, C.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada..
    Weiss, M. J.
    Penn State Univ, Dept Phys, University Pk, PA 16802 USA..
    Wendt, C.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Westerhoff, S.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Whelan, B. J.
    Univ Adelaide, Dept Phys, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia..
    Wickmann, S.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Wiebe, K.
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Phys, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz, Germany..
    Wiebusch, C. H.
    Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Physikal Inst 3, D-52056 Aachen, Germany..
    Wille, L.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Williams, D. R.
    Univ Alabama, Dept Phys & Astron, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA..
    Wills, L.
    Drexel Univ, Dept Phys, 3141 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Wolf, M.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Wood, J.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Wood, T. R.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada..
    Woolsey, E.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada..
    Woschnagg, K.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Phys, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Xu, D. L.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Xu, X. W.
    Southern Univ, Dept Phys, Baton Rouge, LA 70813 USA..
    Xu, Y.
    SUNY Stony Brook, Dept Phys & Astron, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA..
    Yanez, J. P.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Phys, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada..
    Yodh, G.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Phys & Astron, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Yoshida, S.
    Chiba Univ, Dept Phys, Chiba 2638522, Japan.;Chiba Univ, Inst Global Prominent Res, Chiba 2638522, Japan..
    Yuan, T.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Phys, Madison, WI 53706 USA.;Univ Wisconsin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophys Ctr, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Zoll, M.
    Stockholm Univ, Oskar Klein Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Search for neutrinos from dark matter self-annihilations in the center of the Milky Way with 3 years of IceCube/DeepCore2017In: European Physical Journal C, ISSN 1434-6044, E-ISSN 1434-6052, Vol. 77, no 9, 627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a search for a neutrino signal from dark matter self-annihilations in the Milky Way using the Ice-Cube Neutrino Observatory (IceCube). In 1005 days of data we found no significant excess of neutrinos over the background of neutrinos produced in atmospheric air showers from cosmic ray interactions. We derive upper limits on the velocity averaged product of the darkmatter self-annihilation cross section and the relative velocity of the dark matter particles <sigma Av >. Upper limits are set for darkmatter particle candidate masses ranging from 10GeV up to 1TeV while considering annihilation through multiple channels. This work sets the most stringent limit on a neutrino signal from dark matter with mass between 10 and 100GeV, with a limit of 1.18 . 10-23 cm(3)s(-1) for 100GeV dark matter particles self-annihilating via iota(+)iota(-) t-to neutrinos (assuming the Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter halo profile).

  • Woolway, R. Iestyn
    et al.
    Univ Reading, Dept Meteorol, Reading, Berks, England..
    Verburg, Piet
    Natl Inst Water & Atmospher Res, Hamilton, New Zealand..
    Merchant, Christopher J.
    Univ Reading, Dept Meteorol, Reading, Berks, England..
    Lenters, John D.
    Univ Wisconsin, Ctr Limnol, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Hamilton, David P.
    Griffith Univ, Australian Rivers Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Brookes, Justin
    Univ Adelaide, Sch Biol Sci, Environm Inst, Adelaide, SA, Australia..
    Kelly, Sean
    Marine Inst, Newport, Ireland.;Natl Univ Ireland Galway, Sch Nat Sci, Earth & Ocean Sci, Galway, Ireland..
    Hook, Simon
    CALTECH, Jet Prop Lab, Pasadena, CA USA..
    Laas, Alo
    Estonian Univ Life Sci, Inst Agr & Environm Sci, Ctr Limnol, Tartu, Estonia..
    Pierson, Don
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Rimmer, Alon
    Israel Oceanog & Limnol Res, Yigal Allon Kinneret Limnol Lab, Migdal, Israel..
    Rusak, James A.
    Ontario Minist Environm & Climate Change, Dorset Environm Sci Ctr, Dorset, ON, Canada..
    Jones, Ian D.
    Lancaster Environm Ctr, Ctr Ecol & Hydrol, Lancaster, England..
    Latitude and lake size are important predictors of over-lake atmospheric stability2017In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 44, no 17, 8875-8883 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbulent fluxes across the air-water interface are integral to determining lake heat budgets, evaporation, and carbon emissions from lakes. The stability of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) influences the exchange of turbulent energy. We explore the differences in over-lake ABL stability using data from 39 globally distributed lakes. The frequency of unstable ABL conditions varied between lakes from 71 to 100% of the time, with average air temperatures typically several degrees below the average lake surface temperature. This difference increased with decreasing latitude, resulting in a more frequently unstable ABL and a more efficient energy transfer to and from the atmosphere, toward the tropics. In addition, during summer the frequency of unstable ABL conditions decreased with increasing lake surface area. The dependency of ABL stability on latitude and lake size has implications for heat loss and carbon fluxes from lakes, the hydrologic cycle, and climate change effects.

  • Christianson, Helena C.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Sect Oncol & Pathol, Lund, Sweden..
    Menard, Julien A.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Sect Oncol & Pathol, Lund, Sweden..
    Chandran, Vineesh Indira
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Sect Oncol & Pathol, Lund, Sweden..
    Bourseau-Guilmain, Erika
    Montpellier Univ, CNRS, UMR 5237, CRBM, Montpellier, France..
    Shevela, Dmitry
    Umea Univ, Chem Biol Ctr, Dept Chem, Umea, Sweden..
    Lidfeldt, Jon
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Sect Oncol & Pathol, Lund, Sweden..
    Mansson, Ann-Sofie
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Sect Oncol & Pathol, Lund, Sweden..
    Pastorekova, Silvia
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Virol, Biomed Res Ctr, Bratislava, Slovakia..
    Messinger, Johannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics. Umea Univ, Chem Biol Ctr, Dept Chem, Umea, Sweden.
    Belting, Mattias
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Sect Oncol & Pathol, Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Lund, Sweden..
    Tumor antigen glycosaminoglycan modification regulates antibody-drug conjugate delivery and cytotoxicity2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 40, 66960-66974 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aggressive cancers are characterized by hypoxia, which is a key driver of tumor development and treatment resistance. Proteins specifically expressed in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment thus represent interesting candidates for targeted drug delivery strategies. Carbonic anhydrase (CAIX) has been identified as an attractive treatment target as it is highly hypoxia specific and expressed at the cell-surface to promote cancer cell aggressiveness. Here, we find that cancer cell internalization of CAIX is negatively regulated by post-translational modification with chondroitin or heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains. We show that perturbed glycosaminoglycan modification results in increased CAIX endocytosis. We hypothesized that perturbation of CAIX glycosaminoglycan conjugation may provide opportunities for enhanced drug delivery to hypoxic tumor cells. In support of this concept, pharmacological inhibition of glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis with xylosides significantly potentiated the internalization and cytotoxic activity of an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) targeted at CAIX. Moreover, cells expressing glycosaminoglycan-deficient CAIX were significantly more sensitive to ADC treatment as compared with cells expressing wild-type CAIX. We find that inhibition of CAIX endocytosis is associated with an increased localization of glycosaminoglycan-conjugated CAIX in membrane lipid raft domains stabilized by caveolin-1 clusters. The association of CAIX with caveolin-1 was partially attenuated by acidosis, i.e. another important feature of malignant tumors. Accordingly, we found increased internalization of CAIX at acidic conditions. These findings provide first evidence that intracellular drug delivery at pathophysiological conditions of malignant tumors can be attenuated by tumor antigen glycosaminoglycan modification, which is of conceptual importance in the future development of targeted cancer treatments.

  • Lennartsson, Carin
    et al.
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet.
    Sundström, Gerdt
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Institute of Gerontology. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. SALVE (Social challenges, Actors, Living conditions, reseach VEnue). Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ARN-J (Aging Research Network - Jönköping).
    Wikström, Petter
    Statistiska centralbyrån.
    Allt fler guldbröllop2017In: Välfärd, ISSN 1651-6710, no 4, 18-19 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    "Vi lever allt längre, vilket ger möjlighet till längre äktenskap. Trots ökande skilsmässotal under 1900-talet är det allt fler som lever i äktenskap som varat 50 år och mer."

  • Rådmark, Lina
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Ctr Social Sustainabil, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hanson, Linda L. Magnusson
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bojner Horwitz, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Ctr Social Sustainabil, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Osika, Walter
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Ctr Social Sustainabil, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stress Clin, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Prevalence of mind and body exercises (MBE) in relation to demographics, self-rated health, and purchases of prescribed psychotropic drugs and analgesics2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 9, e0184635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to identify any differences regarding gender, age, socioeconomic status (SES), self-rated health, perceived stress and the purchase of prescribed drugs among people who practice mind and body exercises (MBE) extensively compared to people who do not. Methods: The study includes 3,913 men and 4,803 women aged 20-72 who participated in the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). The respondents were divided into three groups depending on frequency of MBE practice (never/seldom/often). Measures regarding MBE practice, health behaviors, self-rated health, and illnesses were drawn from the SLOSH questionnaire, while more objective measures of socioeconomic status and education were derived from registry data. In addition, data on purchases of prescription drugs for all respondents were included in the study. These data were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, which contains information about prescription drugs dispensed at Swedish pharmacies. Separate analyses were performed for mental MBE (mindfulness, meditation, relaxation techniques) and physical MBE (yoga, Tai Chi, Qi Gong), respectively. Results: A high intensity MBE practice is cross-sectionally related to poor self-assessed health (sleeping problems, pain, depressive symptoms, mental disorders), high levels of stress, and high levels of purchases of psychotropic drugs and analgesics. These cross-sectional relationships are generally stronger for mental MBE than for bodily-directed MBE. More women than men are practicing MBE on a regular basis, and physically active people participate to a greater extent in MBE compared with the physically inactive. Conclusion: Overall, the study shows that frequent participation in mind and body exercises is associated with high levels of purchases of psychotropic drugs and analgesics as well as with poor self-assessed health and high levels of stress. However, since this is a cross-sectional study, it is impossible to establish cause and effect, and to further investigate the associations found; longitudinal studies that can account for temporality between covariates and MBE use are needed.

  • Deininger, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Faithfull, Carolyn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bergström, A. K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Nitrogen effects on the pelagic food web are modified by dissolved organic carbon2017In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 184, no 4, 901-916 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global environmental change has altered the nitrogen (N) cycle and enhanced terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loadings to northern boreal lakes. However, it is still unclear how enhanced N availability affects pelagic food web efficiency (FWE) and crustacean zooplankton growth in N limited boreal lakes. Here, we performed in situ mesocosm experiments in six unproductive boreal Swedish lakes, paired across a DOC gradient, with one lake in each pair fertilized with N (2011: reference year; 2012, 2013: impact years). We assessed how zooplankton growth and FWE were affected by changes in pelagic energy mobilization (PEM), food chain length (phytoplankton versus bacterial production based food chain, i.e. PP:BP), and food quality (seston stoichiometry) in response to N fertilization. Although PP, PEM and PP:BP increased in low and medium DOC lakes after N fertilization, consumer growth and FWE were reduced, especially at low DOC-potentially due to reduced phytoplankton food quality [increased C: phosphorus (P); N:P]. At high DOC, N fertilization caused modest increases in PP and PEM, with marginal changes in PP:BP and phytoplankton food quality, which, combined, led to a slight increase in zooplankton growth and FWE. Consequently, at low DOC (<12 mg L-1), increased N availability lowers FWE due to mismatches in food quality demand and supply, whereas at high DOC this mismatch does not occur, and zooplankton production and FWE may increase. We conclude that the lake DOC level is critical for predicting the effects of enhanced inorganic N availability on pelagic productivity in boreal lakes.

  • Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Representativity and Complementarity in Tai Chi as Embodied Documentation2017In: Proceedings from the Document Academy, ISSN 2473-215X, Vol. 4, no 2, 1-24 p., 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to investigate what happens if we leave the criteria of materiality and permanence behind in the study of documents. How far can we stretch the definition of a document or define a documentation process in a situation where neither the originary fact, or object, nor that by which this is represented is material or permanent? Empirically, the paper is constructed as a case study of the traditional Chinese practice of Tai Chi and presents a formulation of the Tai Chi form as an immaterial document and Tai Chi pratice as a doumentation process. The article is structured as follows: (1) Tai Chi is characterised as both philosophy and practice and, (2) Tai Chi is discussed in relation to three conceptual ideas in Document Studies and Library and Information Science; (a) document representativity, (b) complementarity and (c) embodied information practice. Conclusions from the chosen perspectives suggest ”embodied documentation” as a conceptual tool with which to understand immaterial documents, something which may lead to a widened general understanding of documents and documentation processes.

  • Edquist, Samuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Ethical Destruction?: Privacy concerns regarding Swedish social services records2017In: The Right of Access to Information and the Right to Privacy: A Democratic Balancing Act / [ed] Patricia Jonason & Anna Rosengren, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2017, 11-39 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • Ramazanali, Hawar
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Centre for Research on Embedded Systems (CERES). Saab Training & Simulation, Husqvarna, Sweden.
    Managing Radio and Energy Resources in LTE-Based Military Training Networks2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of wireless connected devices are growing exponentially and the importance of this research area is growing as well to meet the known and looming challenges and expectations. The 5:th Generation telecommunications standard is partly embodied by the Machine-to-Machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) technologies and standards to handle a big part of these devices and connections. An example within the IoT paradigm is military training systems where each system can consist of thousands of battery operated mobile devices and their shifting requirements shall be fullled in an energy-aware manner to increase battery operating times.

    Military training radio networks enables realistic combat training. The services and features provided in commercial telecommunications networks are desirable in these often proprietary and task specic networks, increasing capabilities and functionalities. To facilitate the current and future R&D of LTE based networks for adoption in military training networks and services this doctoral thesis intends to provide the starting ground for the energy-aware LTE based wireless communications. The thesis first presents general solutions on how to meet traffic deadlines in wireless networks for large number of nodes, and then continues with solutions for energy-aware LTE-based communications for the User Equipments (UEs).

    The work builds on the problem formulation how to provide energy-aware resource handling for LTE-based military training networks from where three research questions are derived. From the research questions we derive different hypotheses and then test these within the investigated area to answer the research questions.

    The contributions of this work are within areas of resource handling and power saving for mobile devices. In the first area an admission control using deterministic analysis is proposed fullling traffic requirements for military training mobile nodes. This admission control is enhanced for multiple-channel base stations, and evaluated using mobile nodes with different heterogeneous traffic requirements. In the second part energy-awareness is in focus for LTE/LTE-A based networks. The main power saving method for LTE/LTE-A UEs, Discontinuous Reception (DRX) mechanism, is evaluated and models for DRX in Idle and Connected state are proposed including metrics for wake-up delay and power saving. Additionally a mean queuing delay analysis is proposed for a variant of the Connected state DRX. Using these models and metrics, practical design guidelines for tuning of DRX parameters are proposed, including optimization of DRX parameters for either minimizing delay or maximizing power saving.

  • Ayyalasomayajula, Kalyan Ram
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Brun, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Semantic Labeling using Convolutional Networks coupled with Graph-Cuts for Document binarization2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • Donoso, Alejandra
    Stockholm University.
    Expresiones de movimiento en español como segunda lengua y como lengua heredada: Conceptualización y entrega del Camino, la Manera y la Base2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The current thesis is based on four individual studies which aim to account for the expression of motion events (ME) in Spanish and Swedish as first languages (L1), in Swedish as a second language (L2), and in Spanish as a heritage language (SHL). The data, resulting from audio-recordings of different sorts of stimuli, have been analyzed with special focus on (1) the most common structures used for referring to various types of ME, (2) the types and amount of information provided by the participants, in particular as regards the semantic components Path, Manner and Ground, and (3) grammatical aspect and types of syntactic structures resorted to, including the correlation between the two latter factors and speakers’ discursive preferences.

         Study 1 sets out to explore how Spanish and Swedish native speakers convey information about motion. The results show that the Swedish L1 speakers produced a wider range of descriptions concerning Manner and Path than the Spanish L1 speakers; furthermore, both groups delivered detailed Ground descriptions, although the Swedish native speakers expressed final destinations (endpoints) of ME to a greater extent.

         Study 2 aims to investigate to what extent Swedish L1 patterns for motion encoding are still at play in the acquisition of Spanish L2 even at advanced stages of L2 acquisition. The results show that the learner group used a larger amount of Path particles and Ground adjuncts (in particular those referring to endpoints) than did the Spanish natives; this finding supports the claim that L2 learners rely on the lexicalization patterns of their L1 when describing ME in an L2. As for Manner, the L2 speakers were found to express this component mainly outside the verb, and to deliver more information about Manner than the Spanish natives.

         Study 3 addresses the construal of ME in Swedish speakers of L2 Spanish, in particular concerning the encoding of motion endpoints and Manner of motion. The results show that the Swedish learners of Spanish exhibited the same, high frequencies of endpoint marking as did their monolingual Swedish peers, thus deviating from the Spanish native pattern. Moreover, the L2 speakers used the same amount of Manner verbs as did the Spanish natives but tended consistently to provide additional Manner information in periphrastic constructions.

         Finally, Study 4 sets out to analyze the ways in which L1 Spanish/L2 Swedish early and late bilinguals express ME in SHL. The aim is to show in which ways and to what extent the typological patterns for motion encoding in the L2 may impact on motion encoding in the L1 with regard to three parameters: (1) age of onset (AO) of the acquisition of L2, (2) length of residence (LoR) in the L2 environment and (3) contact level with the L1 (CL). The focus data, consisting of oral re-tellings produced by the bilinguals, were compared to analogous data produced by two control groups (native speakers of Spanish and Swedish) in order to analyze conflation patterns regarding Manner, Path and Ground information. The analysis points to the conclusion that both the individuals’ AO of L2 acquisition and their LoR in the L2 environment have affected their L1 conceptualization patterns while their CL plays a subordinate role.

         In summary, the findings lend support to the idea that the habitual conceptualization of events in the L1 influences L2 acquisition; conversely, the conceptual patterns of the L2 have an impact on L1 usage in bilinguals, especially in combination with an early AO and a long LoR.

  • Dini, Hoda
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Materials and Manufacturing. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Materials and manufacturing – Casting.
    As-cast AZ91D magnesium alloy properties: Effects of microstructure and temperature2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, there is an essential need for lightweight, energy-efficient, environmentally benign engineering systems, and this is the driving force behind the development of a wide range of structural and functional materials for energy generation, energy storage, propulsion, and transportation. These challenges have motivated the use of magnesium alloys for lightweight structural systems. Magnesium has a density of 1.74 g/cm3, which is almost 30% less than that of aluminium, one quarter of steel, and almost identicalto polymers. The ease of recycling magnesium alloys as compared to polymers makes them environmentally attractive, but their poor mechanical performance is the primary reason for the limited adoption of these alloys for structural applications.

    The Mg-Al-Zn alloy AZ91D exhibits an excellent combination of strength, die-castability, and corrosion resistance. However, its mechanical performance with regard to creep strength, for example, at evaluated temperatures is poor. Moreover, very little is known about the correlation between its mechanical properties and microstructural features. This thesis aims to provide new knowledge regarding the role played by microstructure in the mechanical performance of the magnesium alloy. The properties/performance of the material in relation to process parameters became of great interest during the investigation.

    An exhaustive characterisation of the grain size, secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS) distribution, and fraction of Mg17Al12 was performed using optical and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). These microstructural parameters were correlated to the offset yield point (Rp0.2), fracture strength, and elongation to failure of the material. It was proposed that the intermetallic phase, Mg17Al12, plays an important role in determining the mechanical and physical properties of the alloy in a temperature range of room temperature to 190°C by forming a rigid network of intermetallic. The presence of this network was confirmed by studying the thermal expansion behaviour of samples of the alloy containing different amounts of Mg17Al12.

    A physically based constitutive model with a wide validity range was successfully adapted to describe the flow stress behaviour of AZ91D with various microstructures. The temperature-dependent variables of the model correlated quite well with the underlying physics of the material. The model was validated through comparison with dislocation densities obtained using EBSD.

    The influence of high-pressure die-cast parameters on the distortion and residual stress of the cast components was studied, as were distortion and residual stress in components after shot peening and painting. Interestingly, it was found that intensification pressure has a major effect on distortion and residual stresses, and that the temperature of the fixed half of the die had a slight influence on the component's distortion and residual stress.

  • Ayyalasomayajula, Kalyan Ram
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Brun, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Document Binarization Combining with Graph Cuts and Deep Neural Networks2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • Einarsson, Anna
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting.
    Singing the body electric: Understanding the role of embodiment in performing and composing interactive music2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Almost since the birth of electronic music, composers have been fascinated by the prospect of integrating the human voice with its expressiveness and complexity into electronic musical works. This thesis addresses how performing with responsive technologies in mixed works, i.e. works that combine an acoustic sound source with a digital one, is experienced by participating singers, adopting an approach of seamlessness, of zero – or invisible – interface, between singer and computer technology. It demonstrates how the practice of composing and the practice of singing both are embodied activities, where the many-layered situation in all its complexity is of great importance for a deepened understanding. The overall perspective put forward in this thesis is that of music as a sounding body to resonate with, where the resonance, a process of embodying, of feeling and emotion, guides the decision-making. The core of the investigation is the lived experiences through the process of composing and performing three musical works. One result emerging from this process is the suggested method of calibration, according to which a bodily rooted attention forms a kind of joint attention towards the work in the making. Experiences from these three musical works arrive in the formulation of an over-arching framework entailing a view of musical composition as a process of construction – and embodied mental simulation – of situations, whose dynamics unfold to engage musicians and audience through shifting fields of affordances, based on a shared landscape of affordances.

  • Melén Fäldt, Maria
    Kristianstad University, Learning Resource Centre.
    Högskolepedagogisk debatt: pedagogiska utvecklingsprojekt med studentens lärande i centrum2017Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • Orre, Inger
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Industrial Economics and Management.
    Reporterskap: äventyr, irrbloss, dygder2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • Eriksson, Lars
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Restaurang- och hotellhögskolan.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro universitet, Restaurang- och hotellhögskolan.
    Akner-Koler, Cheryl
    Örebro universitet, Restaurang- och hotellhögskolan.
    Embodied aesthetic movements during mealtime: a provocative method for design innovation of culinary utensils2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2010, the project MER was funded be The Knowledge (KK) foundation. Lars Eriksson, associate professor in applied aestetics and creative events at Grythytte Academy Örebro University, initiated the project MER which focuses on the way people move and interact in the environment around the meal.

    This project has conducted a number of studies about the meeting between utensils, food and the guest in motion, creating the culinary experience. The poster presents a summary of a provocative method applied in all of the different studies.

  • Melén Fäldt, Maria
    Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society. Kristianstad University, Learning Resource Centre.
    Högskolepedagogisk debatt: Tema: Pedagogiska utvecklingsprojekt med studentens lärande i centrum2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • Ringarp, Johanna
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    Forsell, Håkan
    Levande campus: Utmaningar och möjligheter för Södertörns högskola i den nya regionala stadskärnan i Flemingsberg2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den 21 september 2016 anordnade Samtidshistoriska institutet som en del av Södertörns högskolas 20-års jubileum vittnesseminariet ”Levande campus. Utmaningar och möjligheter för Södertörns högskola i den nya regionala stadskärnan i Flemingsberg”.

    Utgångspunkten för seminariet var att under jubileumsåret inte bara blicka bakåt, utan också lufta idéer kring högskolans framtida utmaningar och utvecklingsmöjligheter. Frågor som diskuterades handlade om hur det sociala landskapet bör gestaltas när det är en kunskapsinstitution som utgör navet för platsen, samt vilken roll Södertörns högskola ska ha i den nya regionala stadskärnan som håller på att växa fram.