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  • Bergfald, Bård
    et al.
    Kristensen, Karl
    Lystad, Henrik
    Recycling of Critical Raw Materials in the Nordics2024Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A modern society needs access to critical raw materials (CRM) that are necessary for maintaining and developing its industries, infrastructure and welfare system. Europe has been facing increasing challenges in meeting its need for these materials, which are defined by their high economic importance and significant supply risk. The implementation of the Critical Raw Materials Act (CRMA) of EU aims to reduce this vulnerability by establishing a framework to ensure the Union's access to a secure and sustainable supply of critical raw materials. One important measure highlighted by this regulation is to increase CRM recycling. This report describes potential measures and instruments that may be relevant for Nordic countries and territories as tools for hitting the CRM recycling targets that CRMA introduces.

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  • Anund, Anna
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, The Human in the Transport system..
    SAFEWAY2SCHOOL: Deliverable D10.5 Final report2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Going to and from school is a daily journey for millions of children around Europe. The crash statistics is lacking information about the exact number of child causalities during those trips, but available sources identify the most dangerous situation as the way to and from school buses, situations when the children are unprotected road users. In addition there are several proofs for the need of a door to door perspective in order to improve the safety for the children. SAFEWAY2SCHOOL aimed to design, develop, integrate and evaluate technologies for providing a holistic and safe transportation service for children, from their door to the school door and vice versa, encompassing tools, services and training for all key actors in the chain.

    The project has a user-oriented approach and the European Union (EU) FRAME approach has been used for a stepwise process with a starting point in user wishes, moving on to identification of those in relation to the system being developed, formalisation of them into user needs and combine them into use cases. This is the ground for the definition of the system requirements. The requirements were grouped into blocks of functions.

    The functional blocks identified based on system requirements were:

    • safe route planning
    • information and warning
    • bus driver information
    • notification
    • training and education

    The results are positive, showing cost effective solutions with high acceptance for the holistic approach but also for most of the sub systems behind. However, no chain is stronger than the weakest link and this is true also when it comes to school transportation. Based on a very extensive work to identify future work with standardisations and policy the most essential improvements identified were related to school travel plans, sign at all bus stops and improved driver education.

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  • Aad, G.
    et al.
    Aix Marseille Univ, CPPM, CNRS IN2P3, Marseille, France;CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland.
    Bergeås Kuutmann, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Brenner, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Dimitriadi, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics. Univ Bonn, Phys Inst, Bonn, Germany.
    Ekelöf, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, FREIA.
    Ellajosyula, Venugopal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellert, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ferrari, Arnaud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Mathisen, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Mullier, Geoffrey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ördek, Serhat
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ripellino, Giulia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Steentoft, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Sunneborn Gudnadottir, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Zwalinski, L.
    CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland.
    Performance of the reconstruction of large impact parameter tracks in the inner detector of ATLAS2023In: European Physical Journal C, ISSN 1434-6044, E-ISSN 1434-6052, Vol. 83, no 11, article id 1081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Searches for long-lived particles (LLPs) are among the most promising avenues for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, displaced signatures are notoriously difficult to identify due to their ability to evade standard object reconstruction strategies. In particular, the ATLAS track reconstruction applies strict pointing requirements which limit sensitivity to charged particles originating far from the primary interaction point. To recover efficiency for LLPs decaying within the tracking detector volume, the ATLAS Collaboration employs a dedicated large-radius tracking (LRT) passwith loosened pointing requirements. During Run 2 of the LHC, the LRT implementation produced many incorrectly reconstructed tracks and was therefore only deployed in small subsets of events. In preparation for LHC Run 3, ATLAS has significantly improved both standard and large-radius track reconstruction performance, allowing for LRT to run in all events. This development greatly expands the potential phase-space of LLP searches and streamlines LLP analysis workflows. This paper will highlight the above achievement and report on the readiness of the ATLAS detector for track-based LLP searches in Run 3.

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  • Widing, Hannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Hedenstierna laboratory. Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pellegrini, Mariangela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Hedenstierna laboratory. Uppsala Univ Hosp, Dept Anesthesia Operat & Intens Care, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Chiodaroli, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Hedenstierna laboratory. Univ Milan, Polo Univ San Paolo, Anesthesia & Intens Care Med, Milan, Italy.
    Persson, Per
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Hallén, Katarina
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Perchiazzi, Gaetano
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Hedenstierna laboratory. Uppsala Univ Hosp, Dept Anesthesia Operat & Intens Care, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Positive end-expiratory pressure limits inspiratory effort through modulation of the effort-to-drive ratio: an experimental crossover study2024In: Intensive Care Medicine Experimental, E-ISSN 2197-425X, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    How assisted spontaneous breathing should be used during acute respiratory distress syndrome is questioned. Recent evidence suggests that high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) may limit the risk of patient self-inflicted lung injury (P-SILI). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of PEEP on esophageal pressure swings, inspiratory drive, and the neuromuscular efficiency of ventilation. We hypothesized that high PEEP would reduce esophageal pressure swings, regardless of inspiratory drive changes, by modulating the effort-to-drive ratio (EDR). This was tested retrospectively in an experimental animal crossover study. Anesthetized pigs (n = 15) were subjected to mild to moderate lung injury and different PEEP levels were applied, changing PEEP from 0 to 15 cmH2O and back to 0 cmH2O in steps of 3 cmH2O. Airway pressure, esophageal pressure (Pes), and electric activity of the diaphragm (Edi) were collected. The EDR was calculated as the tidal change in Pes divided by the tidal change in Edi. Statistical differences were tested using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test.

    Results

    Inspiratory esophageal pressure swings decreased from − 4.2 ± 3.1 cmH2O to − 1.9 ± 1.5 cmH2O (p < 0.01), and the mean EDR fell from − 1.12 ± 1.05 cmH2O/µV to − 0.24 ± 0.20 (p < 0.01) as PEEP was increased from 0 to 15 cmH2O. The EDR was significantly correlated to the PEEP level (rs = 0.35, p < 0.01).

    Conclusions

    Higher PEEP limits inspiratory effort by modulating the EDR of the respiratory system. These findings indicate that PEEP may be used in titration of the spontaneous impact on ventilation and in P-SILI risk reduction, potentially facilitating safe assisted spontaneous breathing. Similarly, ventilation may be shifted from highly spontaneous to predominantly controlled ventilation using PEEP. These findings need to be confirmed in clinical settings.

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  • Erlangsen, Annette
    et al.
    Madsen, Trine
    Morthorst Reuter, Britt
    Kjær Høier, Nikolaj
    Nordentoft, Merete
    Wang, August G
    Isometsä, Erkki
    Partonen, Timo
    Solin, Pia
    Viskum Lytken Larsen, Christina
    Katajavaara Seidler, Ivalu
    Bloch, Arnarak Patricia
    Gudlaugsdottir, Gudrun Jona
    Oskarsson, Hogni
    Mehlum, Lars
    Khan, Murad M
    Khan, Aga
    Wasserman, Danuta
    Carli, Vladimir
    Hadlaczky, Gergö
    Prevention of suicide and suicide attempts in the Nordic countries2024Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2022, a total of 3,574 individuals died by suicide in the Nordic countries. This report provides a situation analysis of suicide deaths and suicide attempts in the Nordic countries for the period of 2000-2023. Almost all Nordic countries have a national plan for suicide prevention. However, long-term funding for achieving identified goals is essential to ensure that measures will be implemented in clinical and daily practice.Since 2015, only modest improvements have been observed in the suicide rate in Nordic countries.

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  • Sparrman, Viktor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Astrophysics.
    Bladh, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Astrophysics.
    Way, Michael J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Astrophysics. NASA, Goddard Inst Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 USA; NASA, GSFC Sellers Exoplanet Environm Collaborat, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20770 USA.
    Multiple Habitable Phases on Outer Exosolar Worlds2024In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 962, no 1, article id 83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As stars evolve to higher luminosities during first ascension of the giant branch, previously frozen terrestrial worlds may thaw and host liquid water on their surfaces. Eventually these outer worlds again become uninhabitable due to receiving too much incident light and their water inventory evaporating. Solar-mass stars experience a sudden decrease in luminosity entering the horizontal branch, which could result in a secondary habitable phase for their outer worlds. The outer worlds' time with habitable surface climates is key in evaluating the possibility of extraterrestrial life arising. The times inside the habitable zone (TIHZ) are calculated for outer worlds orbiting between 5 and 45 au around a Sun-like star. By comparing the TIHZ to time estimates for life to arise on Earth, we evaluate whether such outer worlds are promising candidates in the search for extraterrestrial life. We use two different solar evolution models (PARSEC and Dartmouth) and both optimistic and conservative habitable zone (HZ) definitions. Multiple habitable phases are found for each outer world. Outer worlds with orbits as large as Saturn are found to have a secondary habitable phase which exceeds the first in duration. Generally, the time inside the HZ is found to decrease almost monotonically with orbiting distance. Water loss is calculated after the first habitable phase to determine whether a secondary habitable phase is possible. For all orbiting distances the water loss is insufficient to deplete a water inventory equivalent to that of many moons in the outer solar system.

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  • Yildirim, Yeserin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Kristensson, D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Outomuro, D.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Dept Biol Sci, Pittsburgh, PA USA..
    Mikolajewski, D.
    Free Univ Berlin, Inst Biol, Berlin, Germany..
    Rödin Mörch, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Sniegula, S.
    Inst Nat Conservat, Polish Acad Sci, Dept Ecosyst Conservat, Krakow, Poland..
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Phylogeography and phenotypic wing shape variation in a damselfly across populations in Europe2024In: BMC Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2730-7182, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Describing geographical variation in morphology of organisms in combination with data on genetic differentiation and biogeography can provide important information on how natural selection shapes such variation. Here we study genetic structure using ddRAD seq and wing shape variation using geometric morphometrics in 14 populations of the damselfly Lestes sponsa along its latitudinal range in Europe.

    Results

    The genetic analysis showed a significant, yet relatively weak population structure with high genetic heterozygosity and low inbreeding coefficients, indicating that neutral processes contributed very little to the observed wing shape differences. The genetic analysis also showed that some regions of the genome (about 10%) are putatively shaped by selection. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the Spanish and French populations were the ancestral ones with northern Swedish and Finnish populations being the most derived ones.

    We found that wing shape differed significantly among populations and showed a significant quadratic (but weak) relationship with latitude. This latitudinal relationship was largely attributed to allometric effects of wing size, but non-allometric variation also explained a portion of this relationship.

    However, wing shape showed no phylogenetic signal suggesting that lineage-specific variation did not contribute to the variation along the latitudinal gradient. In contrast, wing size, which is correlated with body size in L. sponsa, had a strong negative correlation with latitude.

    Conclusion

    Our results suggest a relatively weak population structure among the sampled populations across Europe, but a clear differentiation between south and north populations. The observed geographic phenotypic variation in wing shape may have been affected by different local selection pressures or environmental effects.

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  • Benedusi, Pietro
    et al.
    Simula Res Lab, Oslo, Norway.;Univ Svizzera Italiana, Euler Inst, Lugano, Switzerland..
    Ferrari, Paola
    Univ Wuppertal, Sch Math & Nat Sci, Wuppertal, Germany..
    Rognes, Marie E.
    Simula Res Lab, Oslo, Norway..
    Serra-Capizzano, Stefano
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Scientific Computing. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Numerical Analysis. Insubria Univ, Como, Italy.
    Modeling Excitable Cells with the EMI Equations: Spectral Analysis and Iterative Solution Strategy2024In: Journal of Scientific Computing, ISSN 0885-7474, E-ISSN 1573-7691, Vol. 98, no 3, article id 58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, we are interested in solving large linear systems stemming from the extra-membrane-intra model, which is employed for simulating excitable tissues at a cellular scale. After setting the related systems of partial differential equations equipped with proper boundary conditions, we provide its finite element discretization and focus on the resulting large linear systems. We first give a relatively complete spectral analysis using tools from the theory of Generalized Locally Toeplitz matrix sequences. The obtained spectral information is used for designing appropriate preconditioned Krylov solvers. Through numerical experiments, we show that the presented solution strategy is robust w.r.t. problem and discretization parameters, efficient and scalable.

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  • Aaij, R.
    et al.
    Univ Groningen, Van Swinderen Inst, Groningen, Netherlands;Univ Maastricht, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Alexander, M.
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Phys & Astron, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland;Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bobulska, D.
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Phys & Astron, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland;Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Douglas, L.
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Phys & Astron, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland;Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Eklund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics. Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Friday, D. A.
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Phys & Astron, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland;Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Grillo, L.
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Phys & Astron, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland;Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kupsc, Andrzej
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics. Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Longstaff, I.
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Phys & Astron, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland;Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    McHugh, N. T.
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Phys & Astron, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland;Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Petric, M.
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Phys & Astron, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland;Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Schiller, M.
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Phys & Astron, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland;Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Soler, F. J. P.
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Phys & Astron, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland;Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Spradlin, P.
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Phys & Astron, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland;Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Whitehead, M.
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Phys & Astron, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland;Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zunica, G.
    Univ Manchester, Dept Phys & Astron, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Model-independent measurement of charm mixing parameters in B → D0(→ K0Sπ+π- )ÎŒ-ΜΌX decays2023In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 108, no 5, article id 052005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A measurement of charm mixing and CP-violating parameters is reported, using B over bar -> D0(-> K0S pi+pi-)x mu- nu over bar mu X decays reconstructed in proton-proton collisions collected by the LHCb experiment during the years 2016 to 2018, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1. The measured mixing and CP-violating parameters are xCP = [4.29 1 1.48(stat) 1 0.26(syst)] x 10-3, yCP = [12.61 1 3.12(stat) 1 0.83(syst)] x 10-3, Ax = [-0.77 1 0.93(stat) 1 0.28(syst)] x 10-3, Ay = [3.01 1 1.92(stat) 1 0.26(syst)] x 10-3. The results are complementary to and consistent with previous measurements. A combination with the recent LHCb analysis of D*+ -> D0(-> K0S pi+ pi-)pi+ decays is reported.

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  • Clark, M. S.
    et al.
    UKRI NERC, British Antarctic Survey, Madingley Rd, Cambridge CB3 0ET, England..
    Hoffman, J. I.
    UKRI NERC, British Antarctic Survey, Madingley Rd, Cambridge CB3 0ET, England.;Univ Bielefeld, VHF, Konsequenz 45, D-33615 Bielefeld, Germany..
    Peck, L. S.
    UKRI NERC, British Antarctic Survey, Madingley Rd, Cambridge CB3 0ET, England..
    Bargelloni, L.
    Univ Padua, Dept Comparat Biomed & Food Sci, Viale Univ 16, I-35020 Legnaro, Italy..
    Gande, D.
    Univ Bremen, Fac Biol Chem, Microbial Ecophysiol Grp, Leobener Str 3, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, MARUM, Leobener Str 3, D-28359 Bremen, Germany..
    Havermans, C.
    Helmholtz Zent Polar & Meeresforsch, Alfred Wegener Inst, Handelshafen 12, D-27570 Bremerhaven, Germany..
    Meyer, B.
    Helmholtz Zent Polar & Meeresforsch, Alfred Wegener Inst, Handelshafen 12, D-27570 Bremerhaven, Germany.;Carl von Ossietzky Univ Oldenburg, Inst Chem & Biol Marine Environm, Oldenburg, Germany.;Univ Oldenburg HIFMB, Helmholtz Inst Funct Marine Biodivers, D-23129 Oldenburg, Germany..
    Patarnello, T.
    Univ Padua, Dept Comparat Biomed & Food Sci, Viale Univ 16, I-35020 Legnaro, Italy..
    Phillips, T.
    UKRI NERC, British Antarctic Survey, Madingley Rd, Cambridge CB3 0ET, England..
    Stoof-Leichsenring, K. R.
    Alfred Wegener Inst, Helmholtz Ctr Polar & Marine Res, D-14473 Potsdam, Germany..
    Vendrami, D. L. J.
    Univ Bielefeld, VHF, Konsequenz 45, D-33615 Bielefeld, Germany..
    Beck, A.
    Bot Staatssammlung Munchen SNSB BSM, Staatliche Nat Wissensch Sammlungen Bayerns, Menzinger Str 67, D-80638 Munich, Germany..
    Collins, G.
    Senckenberg Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr, Senckenberganlage 25, D-60325 Frankfurt, Germany.;Loewe Ctr Translat Biodivers Genom, Senckenberganlage 25, D-60325 Frankfurt, Germany.;Manaaki Whenua Landcare Res, 231 Morrin Rd St Johns, Auckland 1072, New Zealand..
    Friedrich, M. W.
    Univ Bremen, Fac Biol Chem, Microbial Ecophysiol Grp, Leobener Str 3, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, MARUM, Leobener Str 3, D-28359 Bremen, Germany..
    Halanych, K. M.
    Univ N Carolina, Ctr Marine Sci, 5600 Marvin K Moss Lane, Wilmington, NC 28409 USA..
    Masello, J. F.
    Univ Bielefeld, VHF, Konsequenz 45, D-33615 Bielefeld, Germany.;Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Giessen, Germany..
    Nagel, R.
    Univ Bielefeld, VHF, Konsequenz 45, D-33615 Bielefeld, Germany.;Univ St Andrews, Sch Biol, St Andrews KY16 9TH, Fife, Scotland..
    Noren, K.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Printzen, C.
    Senckenberg Biodivers & Climate Res Ctr, Senckenberganlage 25, D-60325 Frankfurt, Germany.;Loewe Ctr Translat Biodivers Genom, Senckenberganlage 25, D-60325 Frankfurt, Germany.;Nat Hist Museum Frankfurt, Senckenberganlage 25, D-60325 Frankfurt, Germany..
    Ruiz, M. B.
    Helmholtz Zent Polar & Meeresforsch, Alfred Wegener Inst, Handelshafen 12, D-27570 Bremerhaven, Germany.;Univ Duisburg Essen, Univ Str 5, D-45151 Essen, Germany..
    Wohlrab, S.
    Helmholtz Zent Polar & Meeresforsch, Alfred Wegener Inst, Handelshafen 12, D-27570 Bremerhaven, Germany.;Univ Oldenburg HIFMB, Helmholtz Inst Funct Marine Biodivers, D-23129 Oldenburg, Germany..
    Becker, B.
    Univ Cologne, Inst Pflanzenwissensch, Zulpicher Str 47b, D-60674 Cologne, Germany..
    Dumack, K.
    Univ Cologne, Terr Okol, Zulpicher Str 47b, D-60674 Cologne, Germany..
    Ghaderiardakani, F.
    Friedrich Schiller Univ Jena, Inst Inorgan & Analyt Chem, Lessingstr 8, D-07743 Jena, Germany..
    Glaser, K.
    Univ Rostock, Inst Biol Sci Appl Ecol & Phycol, Albert Einstein Str 3, D-18059 Rostock, Germany..
    Heesch, S.
    Univ Rostock, Inst Biol Sci Appl Ecol & Phycol, Albert Einstein Str 3, D-18059 Rostock, Germany..
    Held, C.
    Helmholtz Zent Polar & Meeresforsch, Alfred Wegener Inst, Handelshafen 12, D-27570 Bremerhaven, Germany..
    John, U.
    Helmholtz Zent Polar & Meeresforsch, Alfred Wegener Inst, Handelshafen 12, D-27570 Bremerhaven, Germany..
    Karsten, U.
    Univ Rostock, Inst Biol Sci Appl Ecol & Phycol, Albert Einstein Str 3, D-18059 Rostock, Germany..
    Kempf, S.
    Helmholtz Zent Polar & Meeresforsch, Alfred Wegener Inst, Handelshafen 12, D-27570 Bremerhaven, Germany..
    Lucassen, M.
    Helmholtz Zent Polar & Meeresforsch, Alfred Wegener Inst, Handelshafen 12, D-27570 Bremerhaven, Germany..
    Paijmans, A.
    Univ Bielefeld, VHF, Konsequenz 45, D-33615 Bielefeld, Germany..
    Schimani, K.
    Free Univ Berlin, Bot Garten & Bot Museum Berlin, Konigin Luise Str 6-8, D-14195 Berlin, Germany..
    Wallberg, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Biochem & Microbiol, Husargatan 3, S-75123 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wunder, L. C.
    Univ Bremen, Fac Biol Chem, Microbial Ecophysiol Grp, Leobener Str 3, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, MARUM, Leobener Str 3, D-28359 Bremen, Germany..
    Mock, T.
    Univ East Anglia, Sch Environm Sci, Norwich Res Pk, Norwich NR4 7TJ, England..
    Multi-omics for studying and understanding polar life2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 7451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polar ecosystems are experiencing amongst the most rapid rates of regional warming on Earth. Here, we discuss 'omics' approaches to investigate polar biodiversity, including the current state of the art, future perspectives and recommendations. We propose a community road map to generate and more fully exploit multi-omics data from polar organisms. These data are needed for the comprehensive evaluation of polar biodiversity and to reveal how life evolved and adapted to permanently cold environments with extreme seasonality. We argue that concerted action is required to mitigate the impact of warming on polar ecosystems via conservation efforts, to sustainably manage these unique habitats and their ecosystem services, and for the sustainable bioprospecting of novel genes and compounds for societal gain. Endangered polar ecosystems play critical roles in the Earth's climate system and comprise many different habitats with unique organisms. Here, the authors propose a community road map to use multi-omics data from polar organisms for conservation, ecosystem services and societal gain.

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  • Høyvik Hilde, Christoffer
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute of Nature Research (NINA).
    Dehnhard, Nina
    Norwegian Institute of Nature Research (NINA).
    Birkeland Nilsen, Erlend
    Norwegian Institute of Nature Research (NINA).
    Translocation of capercaillie and black grouse from Sweden to central Europe: An evaluation of ongoing translocation projects2024Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last couple of decades there has been an increasing effort to reinforce and increase the populations of black grouse and capercaillie in several areas in Poland, Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands using translocated Swedish birds. Beginning in 2010, a total of 616 black grouse and 519 capercaillie have been captured in different parts of Sweden and translocated to populations in central Europe. 

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the translocation projects in Sweden, investigate the potential effects on the source populations and lastly to evaluate how the progress of ongoing projects could be evaluated. To summarise, we have found that the current translocation projects of capercaillie and black grouse from Sweden are, in most respects, in accordance with the IUCN guidelines of translocation in conservation. However, we have identified three areas which we propose should be improved upon to better assess the success of a translocation project: better monitoring of the source population, analyse population viability of the recipient population from the start and lastly to improve the communica­tion between the translocation projects and the interested parties at the capture locations in Sweden. 

    We believe that improving upon these three areas will provide a solid foundation for assessing the success of the ongoing translocation projects from the perspectives of both the source and recipient populations of capercaillie and black grouse, as well as the local human interests.

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  • Public defence: 2024-03-15 13:00 Kollegiesalen, Stockholm
    Lidström, Christian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Automated Deductive Verification of Safety-Critical Embedded Software2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Embedded systems are everywhere in society, and in many industries, such as the automotive industry, embedded systems are safety-critical. Embedded systems are today also increasingly controlled by software, with advances in, for example, autonomous driving. Because of this, there is naturally a need for methods that can ensure the correctness of such software, and for processes and frameworks to deal with the ever-increasing size and complexity of the software. Contract-based design is a well-established design methodology within embedded system design, where the complexity of an embedded system is managed through the use of contracts, for dividing the responsibilities to the different components of a system. 

    This thesis presents a formal contract framework, or theory, following the principles of contract-based design. The theory is developed for procedural software, and is defined at the semantic level, allowing it to be instantiated with different languages for defining the contracts and components, depending on what is appropriate for different uses. The theory is parametric on the semantic domain, allowing different types of behaviours to be reasoned about. The thesis also presents different instantiations of the theory, showing both how low-level properties can be specified using Hoare logic or ACSL, as well as high-level temporal properties using temporal logics such as TLA+. The theory also allows different semantic domains to be combined. Within the theory, low-level components can be verified against their contracts in such a way that more abstract, high-level properties can be ensured, when the components are composed.

    A common method for verifying the correctness of low-level software is deductive verification, and Frama-C is a well-known framework in which deductive verification of C code can be performed. This thesis also presents work in the area of contract inference, in the form of a tool in which intermediary contracts to be used in verification can be automatically generated. The method uses the C model checker TriCera as a back-end and infers contracts for use in Frama-C. Finally, the thesis also presents a framework for program instrumentation, which makes certain properties easier to verify. Here, programs with assertions over properties that are typically hard to verify are transformed into new programs with assertions not containing those properties, in such a way that if the new program is correct, then the original program is also correct. The thesis presents concrete instrumentations for so-called extended quantifiers, which are a type of aggregation over arrays, such as finding the sum of all values, or the maximum value, in an array.

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  • Public defence: 2024-03-16 10:15 Geijersalen, sal 6-1023, Uppsala
    Ekholm, Therese
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Animals and Humans: Human-animal interaction in northern Sweden during the late glacial and postglacial time2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When the last remnant of the Weichsel glacier melted in northern Sweden, around 7000 BC, pioneer settlers entered virgin land, following their prey, which in turn followed the vegetation dispersion. Some of the settlers derived from the east and the northeast and spread from the Russian taiga, through Finland and into northern Sweden, the study area for this thesis. Some of the settlers derived from southwest Europe and spread through Denmark, into south Sweden and northwards. These two main flows of people moved in small groups over large areas, close to the ice margin and shared a lithic technology, but with some differences. These differences can be traced in the debris at archaeological sites, along with calcined animal bones. This thesis focuses on the calcined bones and the seemingly most important prey for the southern and eastern settlers respectively, and the changes that occurred during the time frame of 9000-4000 BC. This has been done by identifying Mesolithic sites with calcined bones, selecting bone samples from the assemblages, determining species and radiocarbon dating the samples. The species in focus are reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), elk (Alces alces), beaver (Castor fiber) and seal (Phoca sp.), mainly ringed seal (Phoca hispida), which are the largest and most common species found at the sites. To support the results, previously radiocarbon-dated calcined-bone samples and charcoal samples, found in connection with species-determined bones, are included. This study shows that the people moving in from the Russian taiga in the east hunted terrestrial mammals (reindeers and elks) in the beginning. They continued doing so, even when they reached the coast of the Baltic Sea, where the ringed seal lived at the time. Not until several thousands of years later were the first seal bones left at Mesolithic sites in northernmost Norrland. The people moving in from the south, on the other hand, hunted both terrestrial mammals and seal. Using an additional set of dates from an expanded area in Sweden, together with southern Norway, it is shown that around the 8.2 k BP cold event (6200 BC), the inland settlers changed their prey from a high-ranked prey to a low-ranked prey owing to population growth and climate change. 

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  • Vernqvist, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Communication, Literature and Swedish. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Subversive Bodies and the Sense of the Senses: Lavinia Fontana, Tullia d’Aragona and Gaspara Stampa2024In: Body, Gender, Senses: Subversive Expressions in Early Modern Art and Literature / [ed] Carin Franzén, Johanna Vernqvist, Boston: Walter de Gruyter, 2024, 1, p. 31-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores Epicurean traces in the works of early modern artists, writ-ers and poets Tullia d’Aragona (c. 1501–1556), Gaspara Stampa (c. 1523–1554) andLavinia Fontana (1552–1614). Reintroduced mainly through Poggio Bracciolini’sdiscovery of Lucretius’De rerum natura(On the Nature of Things), Epicureanismstands in contrast to early modern hegemonic ideas striving to separate body andmind. In this chapter, I argue that the writings and paintings of Fontana, d’Ara-gona and Stampa embody views on how“knowledge cannot be separated fromthe bodily world of feeling and sensation”(Ahmed 2004, 171), and that their suc-cessful representations of the (female) body and the senses show awareness ofthe“bodily habits and feelings that express [. . .] domination, so that they, alongwith oppressive social conditions that generate them, can be overcome”(Shuster-man 2006, 6). Thus, in line with Sara Ahmed’s assessment of the relation betweenknowledge and sensations, and Richard Shusterman’s theory of the essentialunion of body-mind summed up as the concept of“somaesthetic,”the analysis ex-plores how early modern literary and artistic expressions of philosophical ideaswere challenged through subversive expressions in women’s art.

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  • Abdi, Saida
    et al.
    Univ Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55414 USA..
    Akinsulure-Smith, Adeyinka M.
    CUNY City Coll, New York, NY USA.;CUNY, New York, NY USA..
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Fazel, Mina
    Univ Oxford, Oxford, England..
    Ellis, B. Heidi
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA..
    Gillespie, Sarah
    Univ Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55414 USA..
    Juang, Linda P.
    Univ Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany..
    Betancourt, Theresa S.
    Boston Coll, Sch Social Work, Chestnut Hill, MA USA..
    Promoting positive development among refugee adolescents2023In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 1064-1084Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Of the estimated 35.3 million refugees around the world (UNHCR, Figures at a Glance, 2022), approximately 50% are children under the age of 18. Refugee adolescents represent a unique group as they navigate developmental tasks in an unstable and often threatening environment or in resettlement contexts in which they often face marginalization. In addition to physiological, social, and psychological changes that mark adolescence, refugee youth often face traumatic experiences, acculturative stress, discrimination, and a lack of basic resources. In this consensus statement, we examine research on refugee adolescents' developmental tasks, acculturative tasks, and psychological adjustment using Suarez-Orozco and colleague's integrative risk and resilience model for immigrant-origin children and youth proposed by Suarez-Orozco et al. Finally, we discuss recommendations-moving from proximal to more distal contexts.

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  • Franzén, Carin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Sweden.
    Vernqvist, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Communication, Literature and Swedish. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Introduction2024In: Body, Gender, Senses: Subversive Expressions in Early Modern Art and Literature / [ed] Carin Franzén, Johanna Vernqvist, Boston: Walter de Gruyter, 2024, 1, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • Franzén, Carin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Sweden.
    Vernqvist, JohannaLinköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Communication, Literature and Swedish. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Body, Gender, Senses: Subversive Expressions in Early Modern Art and Literature2024Collection (editor) (Refereed)
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  • Lidström, Isak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Slut på drömmen om det perfekta glidet?2024In: Svenska dagbladet, p. 30-31, article id 10 februariArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Skidvallans historia framstår som en spegelbild av samhällets utveckling, där svensk ingenjörskonst länge ledde jakten på en universalvalla. När fluorvallan nu av ekologiska skäl förbjudits kanske vi åter börjar söka fästet i tjärdalen och glidet i talg?

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  • Lidström, Isak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Bollspelen i Johannes Schefferus Lappland: Fragment av nordiskt tidigmodernt idrottsliv med utblickar mot Island och de brittiska öarna2024In: Idrott, historia & samhälle, ISSN 0280-2775, p. 70-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sports historians have argued that the type of ball games common in the British Isles, which were practiced by two teams and in which the ball was driven with sticks towards predetermined goals – i.e., hurling, shinty, bandy and hockey – were never played in early modern Sweden. By highlighting descriptions of ballgames in Johannes Schefferus’s The History of Lapland (1674), a source previously ignored by sports historians, this article challenges such a claim. One of the games described by Schefferus has some similarities with the violent stick-and-ball game known in Icelandic sagas as knattleikr. Even greater similarities (such as the start of the game with a face-off and the goals consisting of lines on the short edges) emerge when the game is compared with the Scottish game of shinty. Thus, pre-modern Scandinavia does not appear to have been as isolated in terms of sports and games as has been suggested by Swedish sports historians.

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  • Panel, Nicolas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics.
    Vo, Duc Duy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kahlous, Nour Aldin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics.
    Hübner, Harald
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Dept Chem & Pharm Med Chem, Nikolaus Fiebiger Str 10, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany..
    Tiedt, Stephanie
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Dept Chem & Pharm Med Chem, Nikolaus Fiebiger Str 10, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany..
    Matricon, Pierre
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pacalon, Jody
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fleetwood, Oliver
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Appl Phys, Sci Life Lab, S-12121 Solna, Sweden..
    Kampen, Stefanie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Luttens, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Delemotte, Lucie
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Appl Phys, Sci Life Lab, S-12121 Solna, Sweden..
    Kihlberg, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Organic Chemistry.
    Gmeiner, Peter
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Dept Chem & Pharm Med Chem, Nikolaus Fiebiger Str 10, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany..
    Carlsson, Jens
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics.
    Design of Drug Efficacy Guided by Free Energy Simulations of the β2-Adrenoceptor2023In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 62, no 22, article id e202218959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important roles in physiological processes and are modulated by drugs that either activate or block signaling. Rational design of the pharmacological efficacy profiles of GPCR ligands could enable the development of more efficient drugs, but is challenging even if high-resolution receptor structures are available. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of the β2 adrenergic receptor in active and inactive conformations to assess if binding free energy calculations can predict differences in ligand efficacy for closely related compounds. Previously identified ligands were successfully classified into groups with comparable efficacy profiles based on the calculated shift in ligand affinity upon activation. A series of ligands were then predicted and synthesized, leading to the discovery of partial agonists with nanomolar potencies and novel scaffolds. Our results demonstrate that free energy simulations enable design of ligand efficacy and the same approach can be applied to other GPCR drug targets.

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  • Ciralli, Barbara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics and Neurobiology. Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Brain Inst, Natal, RN, Brazil.
    Malfatti, Thawann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics and Neurobiology. Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Brain Inst, Natal, RN, Brazil; Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Expt Audiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hilscher, Markus M.
    Vienna Univ Technol, Inst Anal & Sci Comp, Vienna, Austria..
    Leao, Richardson N.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics and Neurobiology. Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Brain Inst, Natal, RN, Brazil.
    Cederroth, Christopher R.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Expt Audiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Leao, Katarina E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics and Neurobiology. Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Brain Inst, Natal, RN, Brazil.
    Kullander, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics and Neurobiology.
    Unraveling the role of Slc10a4 in auditory processing and sensory motor gating: Implications for neuropsychiatric disorders?2024In: Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0278-5846, E-ISSN 1878-4216, Vol. 131, article id 110930Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, are complex and challenging to study, partly due to the lack of suitable animal models. However, the absence of the Slc10a4 gene, which codes for a monoaminergic and cholinergic associated vesicular transporter protein, in knockout mice (Slc10a4−/−), leads to the accumulation of extracellular dopamine. A major challenge for studying schizophrenia is the lack of suitable animal models that accurately represent the disorder. We sought to overcome this challenge by using Slc10a4−/− mice as a potential model, considering their altered dopamine levels. This makes them a potential animal model for schizophrenia, a disorder known to be associated with altered dopamine signaling in the brain.

    Methods

    The locomotion, auditory sensory filtering and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of Slc10a4−/− mice were quantified and compared to wildtype (WT) littermates. Intrahippocampal electrodes were used to record auditory event-related potentials (aERPs) for quantifying sensory filtering in response to paired-clicks. The channel above aERPs phase reversal was chosen for reliably comparing results between animals, and aERPs amplitude and latency of click responses were quantified. WT and Slc10a4−/− mice were also administered subanesthetic doses of ketamine to provoke psychomimetic behavior.

    Results

    Baseline locomotion during auditory stimulation was similar between Slc10a4−/− mice and WT littermates. In WT animals, normal auditory processing was observed after i.p saline injections, and it was maintained under the influence of 5 mg/kg ketamine, but disrupted by 20 mg/kg ketamine. On the other hand, Slc10a4−/− mice did not show significant differences between N40 S1 and S2 amplitude responses in saline or low dose ketamine treatment. Auditory gating was considered preserved since the second N40 peak was consistently suppressed, but with increased latency. The P80 component showed higher amplitude, with shorter S2 latency under saline and 5 mg/kg ketamine treatment in Slc10a4−/− mice, which was not observed in WT littermates. Prepulse inhibition was also decreased in Slc10a4−/− mice when the longer interstimulus interval of 100 ms was applied, compared to WT littermates.

    Conclusion

    The Slc10a4−/− mice responses indicate that cholinergic and monoaminergic systems participate in the PPI magnitude, in the temporal coding (response latency) of the auditory sensory gating component N40, and in the amplitude of aERPs P80 component. These results suggest that Slc10a4−/− mice can be considered as potential models for neuropsychiatric conditions.

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  • Pyddoke, Roger
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Transport economics.
    Konkurrens på marknaderna för upphandlad kollektivtrafik2024Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of competition in the procured Swedish public transport have been few. The purpose of this report is to investigate what regional public transport authorities (PTAs), advisory authorities such as the Swedish Transport Administration, and the government can do to increase goal fulfilment and by increasing the use of competition in the procurement of traffic. The report constitutes a compilation and discussion of recommendations for how the procurement of public transport should be done based on existing research and investingation literature.

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  • Brighi, Giada
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Interdisciplinarity in translation studies: a didactic model for research positioning2024In: Perspectives: Studies in Translation Theory and Practice, ISSN 0907-676X, E-ISSN 1747-6623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The seminal role of the Holmes/Toury map within translation studies has led to its use as a didactic tool although neither scholar envisaged this purpose originally. This paper proposes a complementary didactic model to reveal the interdisciplinary layers of research projects after positioning them on the Holmes/Toury map. A critical overview of how maps have evolved from descriptions of the field to having didactic purposes is given, and criticism of the Holmes/Toury map is reviewed to demonstrate its importance for the first positioning of a work. An investigation of eight sample theses indicates the current interdisciplinary research trends and suggests the need for a more refined didactic tool. The proposed model is introduced as a way to fill an evident gap. Its aim is to help students and researchers position their own and other academic work within translation studies to gain deeper awareness in this regard. By presenting a general model for researchers' use, its concrete application to two cases – a book-long and a shorter publication – and a discussion of its strengths and weaknesses, I argue that it is a useful didactic tool for obtaining a clearer overview of the interdisciplinarity typical for research in translation studies.

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  • Public defence: 2024-03-15 09:15 A1:107a, Biomedicinskt centrum, Uppsala
    Norman, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Physiological Studies of Native and Stem Cell-Derived Islets2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the β-cells of the islets of Langerhans are either destroyed by the immune system or stressed due to peripheral insulin resistance. To improve the life of patients with these diseases, new treatments are needed. This thesis examined the role of irisin and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) in islets of Langerhans and their potential pharmaceutical role in type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, β-cell replacement with stem cell-derived islets of Langerhans (SC-islets) for type 1 diabetes was evaluated for optimal implantation site.

    In paper I, the physiological role of CART in rat islets was examined. CART was shown to specifically lower islet blood flow, which could be a protective effect in type 2 diabetes. No effect from CART on glucose tolerance or insulin release was seen in rat islets, which highlights species differences.

    In paper II, the expression of irisin and its effect on hormone secretion and pancreatic blood flow was examined. Irisin was expressed in human islets and was secreted glucose dependently. It also lowered islet blood flow but did not affect glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in isolated human or rat islets. Thus, local secretion of irisin could serve as a protective function by lowering islet blood flow in a high glucose state.

    In paper III, the expression of irisin in SC-islets and its potential beneficial effects in transplantation was examined. SC-islets were found to express higher levels of irisin than human islets. Irisin treatment had no effects on viability and proliferation in SC-islets, in contrast to previous studies in other species. Thus, irisin signaling likely differs between SC-islets and murine and native human islets.

    In paper IV, SC-islets were transplanted to multiple sites in mice to find the optimal implantation site in terms of graft maturity, function and composition. The liver proved to be the most favorable site due to its higher expression of islet maturity genes and a higher β-cell function and fraction. This poses a dilemma, as the liver site is the most challenging to biopsy and monitor for safety.

    In summary, this thesis uncovered new physiological functions of irisin and CART, potentially offering insights relevant to the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Meanwhile, the role of irisin in transplantation of SC-islets seems limited.

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  • Stub Nybelius, Marit
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sport and Health Science.
    Medie- och informationskunnighet är mer än bara källkritik och tekniskt kunnande. Vilka behov är det som behöver mötas och hur?2024In: Utbildning och Lärande / Education and Learning, ISSN 2001-4554, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 77-89Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The same day as the invasion of Ukraine started, the two biggest TVnews channels in Sweden and the prime minister pointed out the problem with source criticism of media and that it is difficult to know what a reliable source is and why it is very important to be critical (SVT, 2022; TV4, 2022). This article dwells on source criticism in mainly digital media within the school subject of civics, both as a problematizing text and as a discussion. The discussion has its basis in two studies. One is a study from the Swedish Schools Inspectorate that originates from an audit of the teaching of source criticism within civics classes, mainly in regards to digital media and where there is a criticism towards the content and teaching of the subject. The other study is a study from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) that was published in May 2021. It is a PISA study where it was noted that 15 year old pupils all over the world had difficulties in sorting facts from opinions in digital media. The Nordic Countries were ranked high, despite only around 50 percent of the pupils managing to differ between fact and opinion. The two studies are then brought up in conjunction with previous research, which mainly focuses on the teaching of source criticism within civic classes and the mediatization process that is ongoing in society, and which forms the basis for the discussion. Based on the problematization it is evident that there is a strong need to increase the knowledge of media and information among pupils, if they are to be brought up as citizens in a democracy. The three main questions are therefore, what kind of MIL do the pupils have and do the teachers in the schools have the opportunity to further their education to a required level and is it reasonable that student teachers in the subjects they are training for should also have time to educate themselves sufficiently in Media and information literacy to be able to strengthen the pupils MIK? 

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  • Fors Connolly, Filip
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Olofsson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Josefsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Do reductions of daily activities mediate the relationship between COVID-19 restrictions and mental ill-health among older persons in Europe?2024In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Previous research has shown that daily activities are crucial for mental health among older people, and that such activities declined during the COVID-19 pandemic. While previous studies have confirmed a link between stringent restrictions and an increase in mental ill-health, the role of daily activities as a mediator in this relationship remains underexplored. We analyzed whether reductions in daily activities mediated the impact of these COVID-19 restrictions on mental ill-health during the pandemic’s initial phase.

    Methods: We used data from Wave 8 SHARE Corona Survey covering 41,409 respondents from 25 European countries and Israel as well as data on COVID-19 restrictions from the Oxford Government Response  Tracker  (OxCGRT).  Multilevel  regression  and  multilevel-mediation  analysis  were  used  to  examine the relationships between restrictions, daily activities and mental ill-health.

    Results: Reductions in walking and shopping showed a notably stronger association with increases in mental ill-health compared to social activities. Furthermore, declines in walking could account for about  a  quarter  of  the  relationship  between  restrictions  and  increased  mental  ill-health,  but  the  mediating effects of the other activates were negligible.

    Conclusions: The study highlights the essential role of maintaining daily activities, particularly walking, to  mitigate  the  negative  psychological  effects  of  pandemic-related  restrictions  among  older  populations in Europe.

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  • Meili, Kaspar Walter
    et al.
    Umeå Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Global Hlth, Umeå, Sweden..
    Mulhern, Brendan
    Univ Technol Sidney, Ctr Hlth Econ Res & Evaluat, Ultimo, Australia..
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Norström, Fredrik
    Umeå Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Global Hlth, Umeå, Sweden..
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP. Umeå Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Global Hlth, Umeå, Sweden.
    Månsdotter, Anna
    Umeå Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Global Hlth, Umeå, Sweden..
    Hjelte, Jan
    Umeå Univ, Dept Social Work, Umeå, Sweden..
    Lindholm, Lars
    Umeå Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Global Hlth, Umeå, Sweden..
    Eliciting a value set for the Swedish Capability-Adjusted Life Years instrument (CALY-SWE)2024In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 59-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Our aim was to elicit a value set for Capability-Adjusted Life Years Sweden (CALY-SWE); a capability-grounded quality of life instrument intended for use in economic evaluations of social interventions with broad consequences beyond health.

    Methods

    Building on methods commonly used in the quality-adjusted life years EQ-5D context, we collected time-trade off (TTO) and discrete choice experiment (DCE) data through an online survey from a general population sample of 1697 Swedish participants. We assessed data quality using a score based on the severity of inconsistencies. For generating the value set, we compared different model features, including hybrid modeling of DCE and TTO versus TTO data only, censoring of TTO answers, varying intercept, and accommodating for heteroskedasticity. We also assessed the models’ DCE logit fidelity to measure agreement with potentially less-biased DCE data. To anchor the best capability state to 1 on the 0 to 1 scale, we included a multiplicative scaling factor.

    Results

    We excluded 20% of the TTO answers of participants with the largest inconsistencies to improve data quality. A hybrid model with an anchor scale and censoring was chosen to generate the value set; models with heteroskedasticity considerations or individually varying intercepts did not offer substantial improvement. The lowest capability weight was 0.114. Health, social relations, and finance and housing attributes contributed the largest capability gains, followed by occupation, security, and political and civil rights.

    Conclusion

    We elicited a value set for CALY-SWE for use in economic evaluations of interventions with broad social consequences.

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  • Public defence: 2024-03-22 09:00 Berzeliussalen, building 463, Linköping
    Karlsson, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Abdominal Aortic Wall Mechanics - Stress, Strain and Stiffness in A Medical Perspective: An Experimental Study in Man2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:  

    The stiffness of the abdominal aorta is considered a significant factor affecting the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease. Estimating vascular stiffness is an integral part in cardiovascular risk assessment. Wall stress of the abdominal aorta appears to be a crucial factor in the remodeling of the arterial wall and the growth of aneurysms. Consequently, arterial mechanics plays a vital role in the function of the cardiovascular system. Therefore, there is a need for comprehensive studies of mechanical forces in the vessel wall to better understand the mechanisms behind normal and pathological changes that are significant for hypertension, atherosclerosis, and the development of arterial aneurysms. The aim of this study was to explore the blood pressure-induced forces in the aortic wall using a computational mechanical model, with particular attention to the effects of age, sex, and blood pressure on the remodeling process of the vessel wall.  

    Methods:  

    A computational model, comprising a solid mechanical model and a parameter identification process known as the Parameter Identification Method for Mechanical Parameters (PIMMP), was used to investigate the mechanical properties of the abdominal aortic vessel wall. Data for the model were obtained from the human abdominal aorta of volunteers: 30 healthy individuals, females (n=15) and males, divided into three age groups with an equal number of females and males (n=5 in each age group). Invasive blood pressure, measured via catheter, and diameter variation in the abdominal aorta, measured via ultrasound, were acquired to be used as input data for PIMMP. This dataset was utilized in Papers I, III, and IV. In Paper II, 24 datasets were generated, based on model parameters presented in the scientific literature.   

    Results:  

    Paper I reveals that elderly males exhibit both higher aortic wall stress and higher isotropic stress component, than females. With age, males show an increase in isotropic load-bearing fraction and a decrease in anisotropic load-bearing fraction, a trend not observed in females.  

    Paper II validates an in silico aortic model against a computerized membrane model of an abdominal aorta. The membrane model accurately predicts stress states as well as the load-bearing fraction of anisotropic material across all blood pressure levels, independent of the transmural stress gradient. However, the model’s accuracy is limited due to insufficient in vivo axial loading information.  

    Paper III demonstrates that changes in circumferential stretch have a more pronounced effect on longitudinal stress than the other way around. Both circumferential and longitudinal stiffnesses increase with age, irrespective of sex. However, sex-based differences in stiffness are observed when comparing younger and older groups.  

    Paper IV investigates pulse wave velocity (PWV) calculations using the Moens-Korteweg equation and the Bramwell-Hill equation. PWV shows a positive association with both isotropic and anisotropic material properties, with a transition zone observed between diastolic and systolic blood pressures, to a positive association with anisotropic properties at systolic blood pressure. Furthermore, an increase in PWV with age, with no significant difference between sexes, is observed.  

    The Extra Material suggests a deficiency in age-related wall stress regulation in males, potentially due to insufficient stiffness of anisotropic materials such as collagen. In contrast, females show an age-related increase in abdominal aortic wall thickness and anisotropic material stiffness, indicating adequate wall stress regulation.  

    Conclusions:  

    This doctoral dissertation focused on the effects of age and sex on the abdominal aortic wall. Overall, the findings suggest potential alterations in the collagen and elastin content during the remodeling of the abdominal aorta, which may differ between sexes. These alterations could be induced chemically or mechanically. The model has shown potential in identifying healthy individuals within a population. These insights may contribute to the understanding of cardiovascular health and disease progression. 

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  • Sitohy, Mahmoud
    et al.
    Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    Enan, Gamal
    Botany and Microbiology Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    Abdel-Shafi, Seham
    Botany and Microbiology Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    El-Wafa, Neveen Abou
    Botany and Microbiology Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    El-Gazzar, Nashwa
    Botany and Microbiology Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    Osman, Ali
    Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    Sitohy, Basel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Diagnostics and Intervention.
    Mapping pathogenic bacteria resistance against common antibiotics and their potential susceptibility to methylated white kidney bean protein2024In: BMC Microbiology, E-ISSN 1471-2180, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As antibiotics cannot inhibit multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR), continuous research is mandatory to find other antibacterials from natural resources. Native legume proteins and their modified forms exhibited broad spectra of high antimicrobial activities. Sixteen bacterial isolates were mapped for antibiotic resistance, showing resistance in the range of (58-92%) and (42-92%) in the case of the Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. White native Phaseolus vulgaris protein (NPP) was isolated from the seeds and methylated (MPP). The MIC range of MPP against 7 MDR bacteria was 10-25 times lower than NPP and could (1 MIC) considerably inhibit their 24 h liquid growth. MPP showed higher antibacterial effectiveness than Gentamycin, the most effective antibiotic against Gram-positive bacteria and the second most effective against Gram-negative bacteria. However, MPP recorded MICs against the seven studied MDR bacteria in the 1-20 µg/mL range, the same for Gentamycin. The combination of Gentamycin and MPP produced synergistic effects against the seven bacteria studied, as confirmed by the Transmission Electron Microscopic images. The antimicrobial activity of MPP against the seven MDR bacteria remained stable after two years of cold storage at 8-10 °C as contrasted to Gentamycin, which lost 20-72% of its antimicrobial effectiveness.

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  • Pöldma, Margus
    Swedish Transport Administration.
    Åtgärdsförslag för säkerställandet av tågfärjeförbindelsen mellan Trelleborg och Tyskland: Redovisning av regeringsuppdrag2024Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Tågfärjorna mellan Trelleborg och Rostock är sedan 2020 Sveriges enda kvarvarande tågfärjeförbindelse. Över tid har tågfärjorna haft en minskande beläggning av järnvägsgods och riskerar att på sikt upphöra med anledning av svag lönsamhet. Trafikverket har fått i uppdrag att redovisa åtgärdsförslag för att säkerställa upprätthållandet av förbindelsen i syfte att tillgodose godstransportnyttan och den svenska försörjningsberedskapens behov av transporter mellan Sverige och kontinenten.  

    Uppdraget anger att de föreslagna åtgärderna ska avse färjeoperatören och hamnen i Trelleborg. I ett längre perspektiv finns ett scenario där tågfärjeförbindelsen inte existerar och i uppdraget har därför också övriga långsiktiga redundansalternativ, med och utan tågfärjor beaktats. 

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    Åtgärdsförslag för säkerställandet av tågfärjeförbindelsen mellan Trelleborg och Tyskland
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  • Public defence: 2024-03-28 13:00 room Clas Ohlson
    Saeed, Nausheen
    Dalarna University, School of Information and Engineering, Microdata Analysis.
    Objective Assessment of Loose Gravel Condition using Machine Learning with Audio-visual Observation2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A well-maintained road network is essential for sustainable economic development, providing vital transportation routes for goods and services while connecting communities. Sweden's public road network includes a significant portion of gravel roads, particularly cost-effective for less populated areas with lower traffic volumes. However, gravel roads deteriorate quickly, leading to accidents, environmental pollution, and vehicle tire wear when not adequately maintained. The Swedish Road Administration Authority (Trafikverket) assesses gravel road conditions using subjective methods, analysing images taken during snow-free periods. Due to cost constraints, this labour-intensive process is prone to errors and lacks advanced techniques like road profilometers.

    This thesis explores the field of assessing gravel road conditions. It commences with a comprehensive review of manual gravel road assessment methods employed globally and existing data-driven smart methods. Subsequently, it harnesses machine hearing and machine vision techniques, primarily focusing on enhancing road condition classification by integrating sound and image data.

    The research examines sound data collected from gravel roads, exploring machine learning algorithms for loose gravel conditions classification with potential road maintenance and monitoring implications. Another crucial aspect involves applying machine vision to categorise image data from gravel roads. The study introduces an innovative approach using publicly available resources like Google Street View for image data collection, demonstrating machine vision's adaptability in assessing road conditions.

    The research also compares machine learning methods with manual human classification, specifically regarding sound data. Automated approaches consistently outperform manual methods, providing more reliable results. Furthermore, the thesis investigates combining audio and image data to classify road conditions, particularly loose gravel scenarios. Early feature fusion using pre-trained models significantly improves classifier accuracy.

    The research proposes using cost-effective devices like mobile phones with AI applications attached to car windshields to collect audio and visual data on gravel road conditions. This approach can provide more accurate and efficient data collection, resulting in real-time mapping of road conditions over considerable distances. Such information can benefit drivers, travellers, and road maintenance agencies by identifying problematic areas with loose gravel, enabling targeted and efficient maintenance efforts, and minimising disruptions to traffic flow during maintenance operations.

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  • Ramsjö, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Filling Legal Gaps, or not?: On Occupational Safety and Health for Platform Workers2023In: Revue de droit comparé du travail et de la sécurité sociale, E-ISSN 2262-9815, no 4, p. 268-271Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article focuses on occupational health and safety (OHS) for platform workers in Sweden. Recent case law in Sweden suggests that platform companies may not classify as employers, which could leave platform workers without the protection of OHS law. However, a recent government inquiry (SOU 2022:45) has proposed a new legal category of responsibility that could apply to platform companies. The article highlights that this government inquiry could potentially bridge legal gaps for platform workers in Sweden.

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  • Brivio, Ilaria
    et al.
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Theoret Phys, Heidelberg, Germany.;Univ Zurich, Phys Inst, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Bruggisser, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics. Heidelberg Univ, Inst Theoret Phys, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Elmer, Nina
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Theoret Phys, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Geoffray, Emma
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Theoret Phys, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Luchmann, Michel
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Theoret Phys, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Plehn, Tilman
    Heidelberg Univ, Inst Theoret Phys, Heidelberg, Germany..
    To profile or to marginalize: A SMEFT case study2024In: SciPost Physics, E-ISSN 2542-4653, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global SMEFT analyses have become a key interpretation framework for LHC physics, quantifying how well a large set of kinematic measurements agrees with the Standard Model. This agreement is encoded in measured Wilson coefficients and their uncertainties. A technical challenge of global analyses are correlations. We compare, for the first time, results from a profile likelihood and a Bayesian marginalization for a given data set with a comprehensive uncertainty treatment. Using the validated Bayesian framework we analyse a series of new kinematic measurements. For the updated dataset we find and explain differences between the marginalization and profile likelihood treatments.

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  • Public defence: 2024-03-19 13:00 sal FB42, AlbaNova universitetscentrum, Stockholm
    Florin, Naemi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Cosmic Molecules and Clusters: Knockout Driven Reactions2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fullerenes and PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) are two families of carbon based molecules. These are both present in the interstellar medium, and are there believed to play important roles in various processes, including the formation of stars in the case of PAHs. This thesis presents studies on the structures and dynamics of fullerenes and PAHs and their weakly bound clusters, that all have relevance in an astrophysical context. Here, the focus is on knockout driven reactions in which a single atom is knocked out of a molecule or a molecular cluster as a result of Rutherford-like scattering processes. These are modelled by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations.

    The first study investigates knockout processes where a C60 molecule is collided with helium atoms at 166 eV in the centre-of-mass-frame, similar to the velocities in interstellar shocks. Using a combination of experimental measurements and molecular dynamics simulations we find that highly reactive C59 fragments can be created sufficiently cold to stabilise and survive indefinitely inisolation.

    Following the first study, we model the structures and stabilities of mixed clusters of C60 and C24H12 (coronene) molecules. We find that the two molecular species do not mix very well, but that they like to be in compact formations. For larger pure coronene clusters, we find that the most stable clusters contain two interacting stacks, forming a shape that looks similar to a “handshake”. These results are consistent with earlier modelling studies. Here, we show that such stacks also show up as subclusters in large mixed clusters.

    Finally, we use the most stable clusters from the second study as targets in collisions with 3 keV argon atoms. We find that the simulated mass spectra strongly resemble the corresponding experimental ones. These show that many various forms of new molecular structures, both fragments and large new molecules, are being formed, as a result of the collisions. Here, the simulations give information on the reaction pathways and on the structures of these new species. There are also examples of hydrogenated, but otherwise intact, fullerene and coronene molecules being formed.

    The mechanisms we have studied mimic inter- and circumstellar conditions where shockwaves and stellar winds drive particles (atoms and ions) at velocities similar to those studied here. The reactions covered in this work are thus likely to take place in such environments when carbon-based molecules and grains are energetically processed.

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  • Hüttnerová, Tereza
    et al.
    Czech Univ Life Sci Prague, Fac Forestry & Wood Sci, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Muscarella, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Surový, Peter
    Czech Univ Life Sci Prague, Fac Forestry & Wood Sci, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Drone microrelief analysis to predict the presence of naturally regenerated seedlings2024In: Frontiers in Forests and Global Change, E-ISSN 2624-893X, Vol. 6, article id 1329675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three-dimensional (3D) mapping and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are essential components of the future development of forestry technology. Regeneration of forest stands must be ensured according to the law in the required quality and species composition. Forest management focuses on the optimization of economic costs and quality-assured seedlings. Predicting the suitability of the plots' environment for natural forest regeneration can contribute to better strategic planning and save time and money by reducing manual work. Although the savings may be considered negligible on small forested plots, they are significant for large cleared areas, such as those harvested after large beetle infestations or strong windstorms, which are increasingly common in European forests. We present a methodology based on spatial analysis and 3D mapping to study the microrelief and surrounding of recently cleared areas. We collected data on four plots in the spring and autumn of a single year after the harvest of four Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] stands near Radlice, Czechia using a multirotor Phantom 4 Pro UAV with a red, green, blue (RGB) camera. We used RGB imagery to compute microrelief data at a very high spatial resolution and the surrounding forest stands after harvesting. We used the microrelief data to estimate the amount of water accumulation and incoming solar radiation across the sites. Based on presence data of newly-established seedlings, we used linear mixed effects models to create a suitability map for each site. Model variables included topographic wetness index, solar area radiation, fencing, type of soil preparation, and distance to the nearest mature forest edge. The topographic wetness index and fencing had strong positive influence on seedling establishment, while solar radiation had a negative influence. Our proposed methodology could be used to predict spontaneous regeneration on cleared harvest areas, or it can estimate how much area is suitable for regeneration, which can lead to important investment decisions.

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  • Diarbakerli, Elias
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Reconstructive Orthopaedics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thoreson, Olof
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björklund, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy. Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational Health Sciences and Psychology, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Dahlberg, Leif E.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Orthopaedics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Englund, Martin
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Orthopedics, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gerdhem, Paul
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Hand Surgery and Orthopaedics, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Unit of Physiotherapy, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine & Surgery, Stockholm Sports Trauma Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mohaddes, Maziar
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Unit of Physiotherapy, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center, Unit of Clinical Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rolfson, Ola
    Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Unit of Physiotherapy, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Abbott, Allan
    Unit of Physiotherapy, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Orthopaedics, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Swedish musculoskeletal researchers view on a collaborative network and future research priorities in Swedish healthcare2024In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 22, no 1, article id e1865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders (MSK) are a global burden causing significant suffering and economic impact. Systematic identification and targeting of research questions of highest interest for stakeholders can aid in improving MSK disorder knowledge and management.

    Objective: To obtain Swedish MSK researchers' opinions and views on a collaborative Swedish MSK network (SweMSK) and identify future research areas of importance for Swedish MSK research.

    Methods: A web-based survey was conducted July to September 2021 to collect data from 354 Swedish MSK researchers. The survey focused on the need, objectives, and structure of a SweMSK network and identified prioritised areas for future MSK research.

    Results: The study included 141 respondents, of which 82 were associate professors or professors. The majority (68%) supported the creation of a new musculoskeletal network. The most supported element was increased collaboration regarding nationwide and multicenter studies. Respondents recommended the creation of a homepage and the establishment of national work groups with different specific interests as the primary elements of a new network.

    Conclusion: The results demonstrated a need and desire for increased national research collaboration and the creation of a new musculoskeletal network. The high academic experience and active research participation of the respondents suggest the need for MSK disorder knowledge and management improvement in Sweden. Therefore, the SweMSK network may help facilitate effective collaboration and research efforts that can contribute to the advancement of MSK disorder management and care. This study may provide valuable insights for policymakers, clinicians, and researchers to improve MSK disorder care and management in Sweden.

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  • Kreisz, Philipp
    et al.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Faculty of Biology, Biocenter, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany.
    Hellens, Alicia M.
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Plant Success in Nature and Agriculture, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Fröschel, Christian
    Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Faculty of Biology, Biocenter, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany.
    Krischke, Markus
    Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Faculty of Biology, Biocenter, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany.
    Maag, Daniel
    Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Faculty of Biology, Biocenter, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany.
    Feil, Regina
    Group System Regulation, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Germany.
    Wildenhain, Theresa
    Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Faculty of Biology, Biocenter, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany.
    Draken, Jan
    Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Faculty of Biology, Biocenter, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany.
    Braune, Gabriel
    Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Faculty of Biology, Biocenter, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany.
    Erdelitsch, Leon
    Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Faculty of Biology, Biocenter, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany.
    Cecchino, Laura
    Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Faculty of Biology, Biocenter, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany.
    Wagner, Tobias C.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Faculty of Biology, Biocenter, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany.
    Ache, Peter
    Department of Molecular Plant Physiology and Biophysics, Faculty of Biology, Biocenter, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany.
    Mueller, Martin J.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Faculty of Biology, Biocenter, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany.
    Becker, Dirk
    Department of Molecular Plant Physiology and Biophysics, Faculty of Biology, Biocenter, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany.
    Lunn, John E.
    Group System Regulation, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Germany.
    Hanson, Johannes
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Beveridge, Christine A.
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Plant Success in Nature and Agriculture, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Fichtner, Franziska
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Plant Success in Nature and Agriculture, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Plant Biochemistry, Institute for Plant Biochemistry, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Barbier, Francois F.
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Plant Success in Nature and Agriculture, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Institute for Plant Sciences of Montpellier, University of Montpellier, CNRS, Montpellier, France.
    Weiste, Christoph
    Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Faculty of Biology, Biocenter, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany.
    S1 basic leucine zipper transcription factors shape plant architecture by controlling C/N partitioning to apical and lateral organs2024In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 121, no 7, article id e2313343121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plants tightly control growth of their lateral organs, which led to the concept of apical dominance. However, outgrowth of the dormant lateral primordia is sensitive to the plant's nutritional status, resulting in an immense plasticity in plant architecture. While the impact of hormonal regulation on apical dominance is well characterized, the prime importance of sugar signaling to unleash lateral organ formation has just recently emerged. Here, we aimed to identify transcriptional regulators, which control the trade-off between growth of apical versus lateral organs. Making use of locally inducible gain-of-function as well as single and higher-order loss-of-function approaches of the sugar-responsive S1-basic-leucine-zipper (S1-bZIP) transcription factors, we disclosed their largely redundant function in establishing apical growth dominance. Consistently, comprehensive phenotypical and analytical studies of S1-bZIP mutants show a clear shift of sugar and organic nitrogen (N) allocation from apical to lateral organs, coinciding with strong lateral organ outgrowth. Tissue-specific transcriptomics reveal specific clade III SWEET sugar transporters, crucial for long-distance sugar transport to apical sinks and the glutaminase GLUTAMINE AMIDO-TRANSFERASE 1_2.1, involved in N homeostasis, as direct S1-bZIP targets, linking the architectural and metabolic mutant phenotypes to downstream gene regulation. Based on these results, we propose that S1-bZIPs control carbohydrate (C) partitioning from source leaves to apical organs and tune systemic N supply to restrict lateral organ formation by C/N depletion. Knowledge of the underlying mechanisms controlling plant C/N partitioning is of pivotal importance for breeding strategies to generate plants with desired architectural and nutritional characteristics.

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  • Wänman, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Åkerstedt, Josefin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Banitalebi, Hasan
    Myklebust, Tor Åge
    Weber, Clemens
    Storheim, Kjersti
    Austevoll, Ivar Magne
    Hellum, Christian
    Indrekvam, Kari
    Brisby, Helena
    Hermansen, Erland
    The association between lumbar lordosis preoperatively and changes in PROMs for lumbar spinal stenosis patients 2 years after spinal surgery: radiological and clinical results from the NORDSTEN-spinal stenosis trial2024In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) sometimes have lower lumbar lordosis (LL), and the incidence of LSS correlates closely with the loss of LL. The few studies that have evaluated the association between LL and clinical outcomes after non-instrumented surgery for LSS show conflicting results. This study investigates the association between preoperative LL and changes in PROMs 2 years after decompressive surgery.

    METHOD: This prospective cohort study obtained preoperative and postoperative data for 401 patients from the multicenter randomized controlled spinal stenosis trial as part of the NORwegian degenerative spondylolisthesis and spinal STENosis (NORDSTEN) study. Before surgery, the radiological sagittal alignment parameter LL was measured using standing X-rays. The association between LL and 2-year postoperative changes was analyzed using the oswestry disability index (ODI), a numeric rating scale (NRS) for low back and leg pain, the Zurich claudication questionnaire (ZCQ), and the global perceived effect (GPE) score. The changes in PROMs 2 years after surgery for quintiles of lumbar lordosis were adjusted for the respective baseline PROMs: age, sex, smoking, and BMI. The Schizas index and the Pfirrmann index were used to analyze multiple regressions for changes in PROMs.

    RESULTS: There were no associations in the adjusted and unadjusted analyses between preoperative LL and changes in ODI, ZCQ, GPE, and NRS for back and leg pain 2 years after surgery.

    CONCLUSION: LL before surgery was not associated with changes in PROMs 2 years after surgery. Lumbar lordosis should not be a factor when considering decompressive surgery for LSS.

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  • Public defence: 2024-03-18 13:00 C203, Borås
    Gunnarsson, Emanuel
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    On the elements of E-textiles: Fabrication and characterisation of textile routing and electrodes2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    “Smart textile” as a notion was demarcated approximately 25 years ago, leading to an enthusiastic hype around the research. Both academic efforts and members of the maker community developed prototypes and artistic creations that incorporated smart features into textiles. From the start of this research era, numerous authors suggested that smart textiles had the potential to revolutionise the healthcare sector. At around the same time, the European Commission had started raising concerns about the demographic trends in Europe, with an ageing population and decreasing birth rates. The need for long-term solutions to address the predicted increase in healthcare demands became evident. Despite 25 years of research with many papers suggesting a soon-to-come commercial breakthrough for smart textiles, such a breakthrough has yet to be seen. There is only a handful of smart textile products on the market currently, and the much-anticipated improvement in the healthcare sector promised by smart textile research is still absent. At the time of writing this thesis, the European Standardisation Committee (CEN) expresses the view that part of the reason for the lack of a commercial breakthrough for smart textiles is the absence of regulations and standards. Technical reports and testing standards regarding smart textiles are being issued continuously by both the International Electrotechnical Committee (IEC), the CEN and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). These organisations also strive to harmonise the issued guidelines. It is crucial that these regulatory documents describe metrics that are relevant to the applications. Moreover, if easily adopted textile-friendly methods for producing smart textile elements were available to potential producers, in addition to these regulations, the preconditions for a less financially risky market with better functioning smart textile products could be established. This, in turn, might stimulate an increase in the production of smart textile products intended for personalised health. This thesis summarises several aspects of smart textile intended for personalised health (P-health). It provides both suggestions on how to test elements of the textiles properly (their interface with the human body) and how to manufacture components of a smart textile system, such as electrodes and electrical routing. The main objectives of the work behind this thesis include: 1) investigating how functional building blocks for smart textile garments intended for p-health can be manufactured in a textile-friendly way and 2) investigating how to characterise these building blocks in the most appropriate way. It is concluded that such building blocks can be produced and used for smart textile garments in both daily life activities and therapeutic situations. The thesis demonstrates the production of electrically insulated routing integrated into a textile fabric, all done in a single textile production step. For the measurement methods, it is argued that skin-electrode impedance between human subjects and textile electrodes should be measured in-vivo using a three-electrode setup. Additionally, the thesis proposes that instead of measuring sheet resistance, it is better to measure the resistance of the specific smart textile element, as it is shown that sheet resistance is not always applicable to conductive fabrics made from interlaced conductive yarns.

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  • Kopsida, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Liu, Na
    Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, China.
    Kotti, Angeliki
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wang, Jing
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Lasse D
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Jothimani, Ganesan
    Chettinad Academy of Research and Education, Kelambakkam, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Hildesjö, Camilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Regional Cancer Center.
    Haapaniemi, Staffan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Zhong, Wen
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pathak, Surajit
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Chettinad Academy of Research and Education, Kelambakkam, Tamil Nadu, India .
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    RhoB expression associated with chemotherapy response and prognosis in colorectal cancer2024In: Cancer Cell International, E-ISSN 1475-2867, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To examine the role of RhoB expression in relation to chemotherapy response, clinical outcomes and associated signaling pathways in colorectal cancer patients.

    Materials and methods: The study included 5 colon cancer cell lines, zebrafish embryos and 260 colorectal cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin (OXL). The methods consisted of CRISPR/Cas9, reactive oxygen species (ROS), caspase-3 activity, autophagy flux, in-silico RNA sequencing and immunohistochemistry. Gene expression analysis and pathway analysis were conducted using RNA-seq data.

    Results: All cancer lines tested, including SW480, SW480-KO13 (RhoB knockout), SW480-KO55 (RhoB knockout), HCT116 and HCT116-OE (RhoB overexpressed), exhibited cytotoxicity to 5-FU and OXL. RhoB knockout cell lines demonstrated significantly reduced migration compared to the control cell lines. Furthermore, RhoB played a role in caspase-3-dependent apoptosis, regulation of ROS production and autophagic flux. The mRNA sequencing data indicated lower expression levels of oncogenes in RhoB knockout cell lines. The zebrafish model bearing SW480-KO showed a light trend toward tumor regression. RhoB expression by immunohistochemistry in patients was increased from normal mucosa to tumor samples. In patients who received chemotherapy, high RhoB expression was related to worse survival compared to low RhoB expression. Furthermore, the molecular docking analysis revealed that OXL had a higher binding affinity for RhoB than 5-FU, with a binding affinity of -7.8 kcal/mol and HADDOCK predicted molecular interactions between RhoB and caspase 3 protein. Gene-set enrichment analysis supported these findings, showing that enrichment of DNA damage response pathway and p53 signaling in RhoB overexpression treatment group, while the RhoB knockout treatment group exhibited enrichment in the negative regulation pathway of cell migration.

    Conclusion: RhoB was negatively associated with chemotherapy response and survival in colorectal cancers. Therefore, RhoB inhibition may enhance chemotherapeutic responses and patient survival.

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  • Trost, Thomas
    Packforsk, Sweden.
    Electrostatic Discharge (ESD)-Facts and Faults - A Review1995In: PACKAGING TECHNOLOGY AND SCIENCE, p. 303-313Article, review/survey (Refereed)
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  • Trost, Thomas
    Packforsk, Sweden.
    Electrostatic Discharge (ESD)-Facts and Faults - A Review1995In: PACKAGING TECHNOLOGY AND SCIENCE, Vol. 8, p. 231-247Article, review/survey (Refereed)
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  • Benison, K. C.
    et al.
    West Virginia University, USA.
    Siljeström, Sandra
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Yanchilina, A.
    California Institute of Technology, USA.
    Depositional and Diagenetic Sulfates of Hogwallow Flats and Yori Pass, Jezero Crater: Evaluating Preservation Potential of Environmental Indicators and Possible Biosignatures From Past Martian Surface Waters and Groundwaters2024In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets, ISSN 2169-9097, E-ISSN 2169-9100, Vol. 129, no 2, article id e2023JE008155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mars 2020 Perseverance rover has examined and sampled sulfate-rich clastic rocks from the Hogwallow Flats member at Hawksbill Gap and the Yori Pass member at Cape Nukshak. Both strata are located on the Jezero crater western fan front, are lithologically and stratigraphically similar, and have been assigned to the Shenandoah formation. In situ analyses demonstrate that these are fine-grained sandstones composed of phyllosilicates, hematite, Ca-sulfates, Fe-Mg-sulfates, ferric sulfates, and possibly chloride salts. Sulfate minerals are found both as depositional grains and diagenetic features, including intergranular cement and vein- and vug-cements. Here, we describe the possibility of various sulfate phases to preserve potential biosignatures and the record of paleoenvironmental conditions in fluid and solid inclusions, based on findings from analog sulfate-rich rocks on Earth. The samples collected from these outcrops, Hazeltop and Bearwallow from Hogwallow Flats, and Kukaklek from Yori Pass, should be examined for such potential biosignatures and environmental indicators upon return to Earth. 

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  • Thandiackal, Kevin
    et al.
    Computer-assisted Applications in Medicine, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Piccinelli, Luigi
    Gupta, Rajarsi
    Department of Biomedical Informatics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA.
    Pati, Pushpak
    IBM Research Europe, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Göksel, Orcun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division Vi3. Computer-assisted Applications in Medicine, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Multi-scale Feature Alignment for Continual Learning of Unlabeled Domains2024In: IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, ISSN 0278-0062, E-ISSN 1558-254XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods for unsupervised domain adaptation (UDA) help to improve the performance of deep neural networks on unseen domains without any labeled data. Especially in medical disciplines such as histopathology, this is crucial since large datasets with detailed annotations are scarce. While the majority of existing UDA methods focus on the adaptation from a labeled source to a single unlabeled target domain, many real-world applications with a long life cycle involve more than one target domain. Thus, the ability to sequentially adapt to multiple target domains becomes essential. In settings where the data from previously seen domains cannot be stored, e.g., due to data protection regulations, the above becomes a challenging continual learning problem. To this end, we propose to use generative feature-driven image replay in conjunction with a dual-purpose discriminator that not only enables the generation of images with realistic features for replay, but also promotes feature alignment during domain adaptation. We evaluate our approach extensively on a sequence of three histopathological datasets for tissue-type classification, achieving state-of-the-art results. We present detailed ablation experiments studying our proposed method components and demonstrate a possible use-case of our continual UDA method for an unsupervised patch-based segmentation task given high-resolution tissue images. Our code is available at: https://github.com/histocartography/multi-scale-feature-alignment.

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  • Zhang, X.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ràfols-Ribé, J.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Mindemark, J.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Tang, S.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lindh, E Mattias
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Gracia-Espino, E.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Larsen, C.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Edman, L.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Efficiency Roll-Off in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells2024In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding “efficiency roll-off” (i.e., the drop in emission efficiency with increasing current) is critical if efficient and bright emissive technologies are to be rationally designed. Emerging light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) can be cost- and energy-efficiently fabricated by ambient-air printing by virtue of the in situ formation of a p-n junction doping structure. However, this in situ doping transformation renders a meaningful efficiency analysis challenging. Herein, a method for separation and quantification of major LEC loss factors, notably the outcoupling efficiency and exciton quenching, is presented. Specifically, the position of the emissive p-n junction in common singlet-exciton emitting LECs is measured to shift markedly with increasing current, and the influence of this shift on the outcoupling efficiency is quantified. It is further verified that the LEC-characteristic high electrochemical-doping concentration renders singlet-polaron quenching (SPQ) significant already at low drive current density, but also that SPQ increases super-linearly with increasing current, because of increasing polaron density in the p-n junction region. This results in that SPQ dominates singlet-singlet quenching for relevant current densities, and significantly contributes to the efficiency roll-off. This method for deciphering the LEC efficiency roll-off can contribute to a rational realization of all-printed LEC devices that are efficient at highluminance.

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  • Siljeström, Sandra
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Zorzano, MP
    CAB Centro de Astrobiología, Spain.
    Evidence of Sulfate-Rich Fluid Alteration in Jezero Crater Floor, Mars2024In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets, ISSN 2169-9097, E-ISSN 2169-9100, Vol. 129, no 1, article id e2023JE007989Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sulfur plays a major role in martian geochemistry and sulfate minerals are important repositories of water. However, their hydration states on Mars are poorly constrained. Therefore, understanding the hydration and distribution of sulfate minerals on Mars is important for understanding its geologic, hydrologic, and atmospheric evolution as well as its habitability potential. NASA's Perseverance rover is currently exploring the Noachian-age Jezero crater, which hosts a fan-delta system associated with a paleolake. The crater floor includes two igneous units (the Séítah and Máaz formations), both of which contain evidence of later alteration by fluids including sulfate minerals. Results from the rover instruments Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman and Luminescence for Organics and Chemistry and Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry reveal the presence of a mix of crystalline and amorphous hydrated Mg-sulfate minerals (both MgSO4·[3–5]H2O and possible MgSO4·H2O), and anhydrous Ca-sulfate minerals. The sulfate phases within each outcrop may have formed from single or multiple episodes of water activity, although several depositional events seem likely for the different units in the crater floor. Textural and chemical evidence suggest that the sulfate minerals most likely precipitated from a low temperature sulfate-rich fluid of moderate pH. The identification of approximately four waters puts a lower constraint on the hydration state of sulfate minerals in the shallow subsurface, which has implications for the martian hydrological budget. These sulfate minerals are key samples for future Mars sample return.

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  • Li, Yuyang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Saladino, Giovanni
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Shaker, Kian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Svenda, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Vogt, Carmen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Brodin, Bertha
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Hertz, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Synthesis, Physicochemical Characterization, and Cytotoxicity Assessment of Rh Nanoparticles with Different Morphologies-as Potential XFCT Nanoprobes2020In: Nanomaterials, E-ISSN 2079-4991, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 2129-2129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Morphologically controllable synthesis of Rh nanoparticles (NPs) was achieved by the use of additives during polyol synthesis. The effect of salts and surfactant additives including PVP, sodium acetate, sodiumcitrate, CTAB,CTAC,andpotassiumbromideonRhNPsmorphologywasinvestigated. When PVP was used as the only additive, trigonal NPs were obtained. Additives containing Br− ions (CTAB and KBr) resulted in NPs with a cubic morphology, while those with carboxyl groups (sodium citrate and acetate) formed spheroid NPs. The use of Cl− ions (CTAC) resulted in a mixture of polygon morphologies. Cytotoxicity of these NPs was evaluated on macrophages and ovarian cancer cell lines. Membrane integrity and cellular activity are both influenced to a similar extent, for both the cell lines, with respect to the morphology of Rh NPs. The cells exposed to trigonal Rh NPs showed the highest viability, among the NP series. Particles with a mixed polygon morphology had the highest cytotoxic impact, followed by cubic and spherical NPs. The Rh NPs were further demonstrated as contrast agents for X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) in a small-animal imaging setting. This work provides a detailed route for the synthesis, morphology control, and characterization of Rh NPs as viable contrast agents for XFCT bio-imaging. 

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  • Chaguaceda, Fernando
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Institutionen för vatten och miljö, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Lau, Danny
    Goedkoop, Willem
    Fadhlaoui, Mariem
    Lavoie, Isabelle
    Vrede, Tobias
    Zooplankton fatty acids across large environmental gradients in Sweden: Raw data for Chaguaceda et al (2024) Limnology & Oceanography2024Data set
    Abstract [en]

    Zooplankton fatty-fatty acid data from Swedish lakes along a temperature (summer temperatures 6.8–15.9°C), water color (< 0.005–0.51 Abs420), and eutrophication ( mean TP < 1.0–42.3 μg P L−1) gradient encompassing 2002–2010 and 2020–2021 periods (n=100, N=32 lakes). The dataset is divided into two sheets: one with the fatty acid data ("Zooplankton fatty acid data"), and another with the mean lake data ("Lake data"). A third sheet ("metadata") explains the metadata and the abbreviations used in the other two sheets.

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  • af Klintberg, Tord
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Björk, Folke
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Finlands åtgärder mot arbetslivskriminalitet, människohandel och grå ekonomi2024Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • Macassa, Gloria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work, Criminology and Public Health Sciences, Public Health Science. Högskolan i Skövde; Universidade do Porto, Portugal.
    McGrath, Cormac
    Stockholms universitet.
    Common Problems! and Common Solutions? — Teaching at the Intersection Between Public Health and Criminology: A Public Health Perspective2024In: Annals of Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-9996, Vol. 90, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public health and criminology share similar current and future challenges, mostly related to crime and health causation, prevention, and sustainable development. Interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches to education at the intersection of public health and criminology can be an integral part of future training in areas of mutual interest. Based on reflections on teaching criminology students, this viewpoint discusses the main interconnections between public health and criminology teaching through the public health lens. The paper discusses potential challenges associated with interdisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity. Among these challenges is communication across the different fields and their perspectives to be able to achieve the desired complementarity at the intersection of the two disciplines.

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